What Disease Hits Black Men Most

A new study by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that in almost every state men of color continue to fare worse than white men on a variety of measures of health, healthcare access and other social determinants of health.


The report, Putting Men’s Health Care Disparities On The Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level, documents the persistence of disparities between white men and men of color—and among different groups within men of color—on 22 indicators of health and well-being, including rates of diseases such as AIDS, cancer, heart disease and diabetes, as well as insurance coverage and health screenings. It also documents disparities in factors that influence health and access to care such as income and education.

This new analysis provides state-level data for men of many racial and ethnic populations that have not been available before. Among the findings:

  • American Indian and Alaska native men had higher rates of health and access problems than men in other racial and ethnic groups on nearly all health indicators. They also had the highest poverty rate and second worst educational attainment, unemployment rate and incarceration rate.
  • More than four in 10 Latino men lacked insurance (46 percent) and a personal health care provider (49 percent), and more than a fifth (22 percent) had no doctor visit in the previous year due to cost. Latino men also had the lowest median household income, the largest wage gap compared to white men and the lowest educational status.
  • Black men had much higher rates of poverty and incarceration and lower rates of high school graduation than whites. The most striking health disparity was that nationally Black men were more than seven times as likely as white men to be newly diagnosed with AIDS, with a rate of 101.5 new AIDS cases per 100,000 Blacks ages 13 and older compared with 13.5 new cases per 100,000 whites. The disparity was even larger in some states, such as Nebraska,Pennsylvania, and Maryland, where the rate of new AIDS cases was more than 10 times as high among black men compared to whites.
  • Nationally, Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander men had the lowest rate of health problems and the fewest barriers to access of all subgroups of men, even white men.
  • While white men fared better than minority men on most access and social indicators, they had higher rates of some health problems than men of color, such as higher rates of smoking and binge drinking. For example, inWisconsin35 percent of white men reported binge drinking compared with 20 percent of minority men.
  • Some of the states with the greatest access disparities between white and minority men included Connecticut, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Washington, D.C., all of which also exhibited some of the greatest disparities in income between white and minority men. Several states with relatively large Native American populations—Arizona,North Dakota and South Dakota—also had large disparities in access between white and minority men.

The full report, including detailed state-by-state data tables and related fact sheets, is available online.

A companion report released in 2009 examines similar racial and ethnic disparities among women, and includes state fact sheets and interactive data tables, also is available.

For closed captioning, press the “CC” icon in the YouTube player.

Also read:

Eliminating Healthcare Disparities: How Kaiser Permanente & Trinity Health Close Racial Gaps

The Business Case for Diversity in Healthcare

Can Culturally Competent Healthcare Close Disparities Gaps

Latest News

Wells Fargo Launches ‘Many hearts. One community.’ Holiday Campaign

Originally published on newsroom.wf.com. Beneficiaries include the American Red Cross, Feeding America and small businesses in appreciation for being the “heart” of communities SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)– The perseverance of communities continues to be a shining light during these trying times, and Wells Fargo is celebrating the optimism and determination of…

Pascal Desroches

AT&T Chief Financial Officer John Stephens to Retire in March 2021. WarnerMedia’s Pascal Desroches to Succeed Stephens

Originally published on att.com. AT&T [DiversityInc Hall of Fame company] Chief Financial Officer John Stephens has announced his plans to retire next March after 28 years with the company. WarnerMedia CFO Pascal Desroches has been named to succeed Stephens, effective April 1, 2021. During the transition period, Desroches will serve as…

Southern Company: Georgia Natural Gas Opens 10th Annual TrueBlue Community Awards Call for Entries

Originally published on southerncompany.com. Honor recognizes nonprofits supporting Georgia during COVID-19 and distributes grants to sustain continued efforts Georgia Natural Gas (GNG), Georgia’s leading natural gas provider, announces the call for entries for the 10th Annual TrueBlue Community Awards. This year, the awards will recognize hardworking Georgia nonprofits for their service providing COVID-19 relief…

Roger Ferguson to Retire as President and CEO of TIAA

Originally published on tiaa.org. TIAA, a leading provider of secure retirements and outcome-focused investment solutions to millions of people and thousands of institutions, said Roger W. Ferguson, Jr., intends to retire as President and CEO on March 31, 2021. The company’s Board and Mr. Ferguson believe it is an appropriate…

Justice Samuel Alito

Justice Samuel Alito Delivers Series of Highly Alarming Partisan Remarks; Racism Impairs Brain Performance, and More

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito delivers an alarming series of homophobic, partisan remarks. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito rarely makes public appearances, but when he does he apparently wants to make them count, being as irksome and controversial as possible — and completely disregarding the usual ethics required of judges…

Hershey: Leading With Empathy and Connection

Originally published on thehersheycompany.com by Katrina J. Briddell Manager, Global Sustainability & Social Impact There’s no denying: it’s been a tough year for everyone around the world. Here in the U.S., we’ve faced an unrelenting pandemic, mass movements for racial justice, raging wildfires, devastating hurricanes, and an election cycle that…