Wells Fargo’s Le Nette Rutledge Talks Transferrable Veteran Skills and Why it’s Important to ‘Show Up’

Rutledge, a Senior Learning & Development Consultant at Wells Fargo, talks about her journey transitioning from the U.S. Navy and why it’s important to allow your authentic self to show up whether in the military or Corporate America.

Le Nette is a Learning & Development Sr. Consultant within Talent Development & Organization Effectiveness (TDOE) at Wells Fargo. She facilitates courses and programs providing leadership coaching that reinforces the vision and values of the Company for team members across all levels of the organization. Le Nette’s ‘why’ in life is “…to courageously and compassionately impart excellence in every life, place and situation” presented to her.

Le Nette joined Wells Fargo in 2009. Prior to that, she served as a leader of learning teams for Fortune 100/500 companies to include QVC, Inc.; Lowe’s Companies, Inc. and Family Dollar Stores, Inc. She retired from the United States Navy after ten (10) years of service. During that time, the fields in which she focused included Leadership Development, Facilitation/Instructional Design, Career Counseling (specifically recruiting) and Anti-submarine Warfare.

Le Nette holds a B.A. in political science from Norfolk State University in Norfolk VA and has begun work on a M.A. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. She holds Lean Six-Sigma green belt, Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and various coaching certifications.

DI: Tell us a little bit about what it was like transitioning from the military to Corporate America.

Overall, it was fair. I had served in the US Navy for close to ten years. Prior to that time, I had held (what I refer to as ) my first ‘real’ job as a Bank Teller. The thought of re-entering corporate America and now having a son for whom I needed to provide was a bit intimidating. Thankfully I had a really good Transition Assistance Program experience that equipped me with information and resources to begin seeking employment. I was unemployed for approximately one year before finding continuous employment.

DI: Were there any skills you developed while in the military that have been useful in your current role?

While my primary area of expertise (rating) in the Navy was not directly applicable to most occupations in the corporate sector, the opportunities to direct teams and hone my leadership skills proved to be a great asset. Additionally, collateral assignments provided exposure to and experience in various HR disciplines. For example, since I was a Naval Instructor I learned about facilitation techniques, principles of instructional design and evaluation program effectiveness. As a result, I was able to easily transition into Learning & Development as a civilian occupation. The time I spent as a Naval Recruiter exposed me to recruiting practices, policies and experiences that were helpful when coordinating/supporting mass recruiting efforts (i.e. job fairs, seasonal hiring, conferences, etc…) in the corporate arena.

DI: Were there any ERG’s, programs, or even some personal methods used to help with the initial transition of getting acclimated to a new workplace?

Great question! This is where for me there was a most noticeable void. Prior to Wells Fargo, employers with whom I worked offered nothing to assist Veterans with the initial transition. If I found an external resource that could help in my transition, my employers were typically supportive. But again, they offered/developed nothing. It would not be until several years later when joining Wells Fargo that I would (for the first time since I exited the military in 1998) have an employer who offered internal resources/programs to assist members of the military community within the organization.

DI: Also, did you always have an idea of what career or industry you wanted to pursue post-military life?

This question makes me smile. Actually, I credit the Navy with helping me realize that creating consistent and compelling learning experiences was my sweet spot; the point at which what I can do, what others need me to do and what I love to do converge. Since exiting the military, no matter the position or employer, some component of Learning & Development has been a critical component of my job responsibilities. So, a huge ‘shout out’ and “thank you” to the Navy for helping me discover my passion.

DI: Lastly, there are stereotypes that women can’t handle the mental strain of combat or aren’t strong enough. In what ways have you personally opposed these gender stereotypes in the military and continue to do so in your new role?

People will think what they think until they are willing to be open to new and different perspectives. For me, it’s not so much about challenging stereotypes but rather ushering in a paradigm shift. Reality is, yes. For some women the mental strain of being in combat is more than they can bear. AND, the same is true for some men. Whether I failed or succeeded at points in my military career, it wasn’t because I am a woman. It was because I am human and imperfect. This is not to say that others have not had experiences tied to gender stereotypes. It is to say that adversity due to gender was not my reality.

That being said, it is no secret that (generally) women disproportionately face certain dynamics in corporate settings than our male counterparts do (e.g., glass ceiling, equal pay, etc…). How do I usher in a paradigm shift/challenge stereotypes? I simply show up. As my best, authentic, unrelenting self – I show up. I do my best. I challenge the status quo if there is viable challenge to be made. And, I focus on helping others realize and walk their full potential. I’m a woman. When people see me, they know that. So, just in my showing up in this authentic yet results-oriented way, I offer the opportunity for others to reconsider gender stereotypes and shift their paradigm. As my mom would say at times, “Sometimes you have to show ’em rather than tell ’em.”

I heard one Wells Fargo leader share this, “The military is a microcosm of society.” This is so true. The same stereotypes that abound in society exist in the military…because those who serve in the military bring with them the life experiences, assumptions and beliefs of the societies of which they were previously a part.

editsharetrending_up

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Latest News

indicted, baltimore, correctional officers

Judge Releasing Most of 25 Baltimore Correctional Officers Indicted, Accused of Excessive Force and Corruption

Twenty-five Baltimore correctional officers were indicted Tuesday with allegations of assaulting and threatening detainees in a state-run jail, tampering with evidence and falsifying correctional documents. Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Jennifer Friedman released most of them Wednesday, pending their trial. Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby’s office secured these 25…

impeachment, Nancy Pelosi, Donald Trump

Nancy Pelosi Says U.S. House of Representatives Will Proceed With Articles of Impeachment Against President Trump

Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Thursday the U.S. House of Representatives will proceed with articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.  In an announcement on Capitol Hill, Pelosi said “the president leaves us no choice” in pursuing the impeachment. “In the course of today’s events it becomes necessary for…

Kaiser Permanente Takes Workforce Health to Heart

Originally Published by Kaiser Permanente The American Heart Association recognizes Kaiser Permanente’s actions to support employee health and well-being. When Don Nishita, a Kaiser Permanente employee and a Total Health Champion in the IT department decided to foster a healthier work environment for himself and his team, he turned to…

Hilton Opens 700 New Work-From-Home Positions

Post Courtesy of Hilton New openings with the #1 company to work for in the U.S. offer remote work opportunities across the country Hilton has announced the creation of 700 new full-time work-from-home positions, significantly expanding its remote career program and flexible work opportunities across the United States. As part…