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Trump Hate Reigns Supreme Over America

The hater-in-chief, elected by a minority of Americans, eliminates any cover for his supporters. Fair warning: after last week, you're either a hater, or you're not.

Trump rally immediately following Pittsburgh massacre.

Three hate-filled, weak-minded white men, whipped up by Republican racism and bigotry terrorized our nation last week.


In the wake of last week's pipe bomb terrorist, a racist attempting mass murder at a Black church and the worst mass killing of Jewish people by an American since FDR turned away refugee ships before Word War II, Trump went immediately back to his bund-style rallies.

But not before he recommended, "tightening up" the death penalty, as he did when he took out a full-page ad in the New York Times advocating the death penalty for the Central Park Five who were subsequently found innocent. Trump is a person who knows where the wellspring of his support comes from — bigots, women-haters, ignoramuses, frustrated low-education white people — and he truly doesn't care how the rest of us feel.

His other dopey recommendation, armed guards in Jewish temples, is because he has no intentions of stopping his anti-Semitic Nazi-loving comments and re-tweets from Pepe the Frog to "globalists" (a euphemism for Jews). We can expect more violence.

The stunning absence of effective leadership from the Democrats has made the Republican dope-baiting all the more effective. The midterm elections are too close to call, with momentum favoring the bigots, racists and sexists who will tell you penniless families fleeing drug cartel violence (instigated by the apparently bottomless demand for meth from white addicts) are more of a threat than Republican-inspired white men with high-capacity magazines and military-style weapons.

We are treated to almost nonsensical word jumble from Senator Ben Sassa and suddenly-had-to-be-retracted anti-Semitic tweets from House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy. But this hate is more effective than the tiny-minded don't-want-to-offend-any-swing-voter statements coming from the potential speaker, Nancy Pelosi.

The script is flipped on corporate America, however. Amplifying the fact that Trump lost by three million popular votes in an election where 10 percent fewer Democrats voted than 2012. Steve Phillips discusses in his book "Brown is the New White" the changing demographics of America, which makes Trump support a true detriment to recruitment and retention.

If you haven't heard about ESG (Environment, Social, Governance), you should read up. In the words of a senior Wall Street banker I spoke with last week, "it's part of every deal we touch."

What can we do? Vote. Support companies that reflect your values. And someone please get the entire senior leadership of the Democratic Party to retire. We deserve better.

The Conversation (1)
votetocorrect30 Oct, 2018
Saturday, a Anti-Semite Shooter that's a Trump supporter kills 11. Friday the FBI caught the extreme Trump supporter, the MAGA Bomber after 14 bombs mailed! Last week, 2 Blacks shot dead at a Kroger by a white supremist Trump supporter! Trump leads this hate?

Update: Student Wearing MAGA Hat Standing Face-to-Face With Native American Veteran Releases Statement

"I was not intentionally making faces at the [protester]," said Nick Sandmann.

Screen shot of Instagram video by Kaya Taitano

UPDATE: Monday, Jan. 21, 2019 at 7 a.m.

Nick Sandmann, the Covington Catholic High School Junior who stands in front of Nathan Phillips, an elder with the Omaha tribe and a veteran, in a viral video that has sparked outrage, made a statement through a lawyer and spokesman on Sunday night.

Sandmann said the students decided to raise their voices to drown out the comments against them by four Black protesters who identify themselves as Hebrew Israelites. A video has been released of the incident.

"A student in our group asked one of our teacher chaperones for permission to begin our school spirit chants to counter the hateful things that were being shouted at our group," Sandmann said in his statement. "The chants are commonly used at sporting events. They are all positive in nature and sound like what you would hear at any high school," he said.

Phillips walked up to the students and said he started drumming and singing a song to encourage unity trying to quell the argument.

"There was that moment when I realized I've put myself between beast and prey,'' Phillips told the Detroit Free Press. "These young men were beastly and these old Black individuals was their prey, and I stood in between them and so they needed their pounds of flesh and they were looking at me for that.''

But said at one point, he claims the teenagers started saying "Go back to the reservation'' and broke into chants of "Build that wall.'' He also questioned why chaperones did not get involved.

"I was scared," Phillips told CNN. "I don't like the word 'hate.' I don't like even saying it, but it was hate unbridled. It was like a storm."

Sandmann claims he was "not intentionally making faces at the [protester]. I did smile at one point because I wanted him to know that I was not going to become angry, intimidated or be provoked into a larger confrontation."

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington in Kentucky is currently investigating the incident.

ORIGINAL STORY Published Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019

Students wearing "Make America Great Again" hats, who attend Covington Catholic High School in Park Hills, K.Y., were in Washington, D.C. on Friday for the anti-abortion March for Life rally. In a video, it appears that Nathan Phillips, an elder with the Omaha tribe and a veteran, was being mocked by the students at the Lincoln Memorial.

The incident occurred as the Indigenous Peoples March was ending. Videos showing their behavior went viral on social media on Saturday.

One of the students, standing less than a foot away, appears to be trying to intimidate Phillips by staring him down with a mocking smirk on his face. Phillips was in the midst of drumming and singing a song of unity:

Kaya Taitano, who shot the video, told CNN that MAGA hat-wearing-students and four Black teens, who'd been preaching about the Bible nearby, started yelling and calling each other names. That's why Phillips started drumming and singing a song to encourage unity trying to quell the argument.

President Trump, whom the students apparently idolize, posted a tweet last week to mock Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who plans to run for president in the 2020 election.

Trump made fun of the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre in response to a video Warren posted on Instagram.

Phillips, a Vietnam veteran who said he served between 1972 and 1976, is in tears as he explains in a video how the incident on Friday made him feel:

"I heard them saying, 'Build that wall, build that wall.' This in indigenous land. You know, we're not supposed to have walls here. We never did …"

He continued, "Before anybody else came here, we never had walls. We never had a prison. We always took care of our elders. We took care of our children. We always provided for them. We taught them right from wrong."

He said he wishes the young men who taunted him would use "that energy to make this country really great."

Robert "Bob" Rowe is the principal of Covington Catholic High School (email: browe@covcath.org).

An investigation is now taking place, and the MAGA teens could be expelled. The Diocese of Covington and the high school issued the following statement on Saturday:

"We condemn the actions of the Covington Catholic High School students towards Nathan Phillips specifically, and Native Americans in general, Jan. 18, after the March for Life, in Washington, D.C. We extend our deepest apologies to Mr. Phillips. This behavior is opposed to the Church's teachings on the dignity and respect of the human person.

"The matter is being investigated and we will take appropriate action, up to and including expulsion.

"We know this incident also has tainted the entire witness of the March for Life and express our most sincere apologies to all those who attended the March and all those who support the pro-life movement."

More than 10,000 people have signed a petition on Change.org demanding changes at the high school.

Many are saying on social media that the actions of the Covington Catholic High School students mimics how whites tried to intimidate Blacks during the civil rights movement:

Ask the CEO: Is Criticism of Schumer and Pelosi Ageism?

Or is a tyranny of old people and a lack of leadership skills, most importantly mentoring and sponsoring the next generation, open for criticism?

I received a comment from a reader on my last column.

Here's the gist of it:

"I did not tweet or post (your last column) because of the ageist comment/s made about Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer. I have no problem with them being criticized as lackluster, but not because of their age."

Here's my response:

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Ignorance is Driving Trump Support

Most Americans don't know that the overwhelming majority of U.S. immigrants are legal. A Pew report explains immigration.

As the partial shutdown of the federal government continues, it has now become the longest funding lapse in U.S. history. President Trump is demanding that Congress approve $5.7 billion in funds to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Meanwhile, on Friday, at least 800,000 federal workers did not receive paychecks.

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Rep. Steve King's White Supremacy Remark Just Shows His True Colors

King's remarks are "abhorrent and racist and should have no place in our national discourse," tweeted Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney.

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) wants to know why white nationalists and white supremacists are getting a bad rep.

"White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?" King asked in an interview with The New York Times published on Thursday. "Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?"

The far-right lawmaker is at the forefront of supporting the Trump administration's anti-immigration policies and the push to end birthright citizenship. As a matter of fact, King credits himself with getting Trump onboard.

"Donald Trump came to Iowa as a real non-ideological candidate," King said, in the Times interview. He said he told Trump, "I market-tested your immigration policy for 14 years, and that ought to be worth something."

King has previously, on the House floor, shown a model of a 12-foot border wall he had designed.

Thursday afternoon he released a statement on Twitter "clarify" his comments on white supremacy and white nationalism.

"I want to make one thing abundantly clear; I reject those labels and the evil ideology" represented by those terms. "I am simply a Nationalist," he wrote.

"I condemn anyone that supports this evil and bigoted ideology which saw in its ultimate expression the systematic murder of 6 million innocent Jewish lives." Like the Founding Fathers, he wrote, "I am an advocate for Western Civilization's values."

But let's look at King's track record.

In the wake of the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre, consumers and employees pushed back against companies donating to King's campaign in November. He is known for his association with white nationalists, even retweeting a Nazi sympathizer.

(But residents of Iowa still re-elected him for another term.)

King endorsed, Faith Goldy, an openly white supremacist candidate for mayor of Toronto. He often praises far-right politicians and groups in other countries.

In September, during a European trip financed by From the Depths — a Holocaust memorial group — King actually met with members of a far-right Austrian party with historical ties to Nazis for an interview on their anti-Semitic propaganda website. The meeting was just a day after ending a five-day trip to Jewish and Holocaust historical sites in Poland, including the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp.

"In an interview with a website associated with the party, King declared that 'Western civilization is on the decline,' spoke of the replacement of white Europeans by immigrants and criticized Hungarian American financier George Soros, who has backed liberal groups around the world," according to The Washington Post.

In December 2017, King shared a story on Twitter written by the Voice of Europe and quoted Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, who said, "Mixing cultures will not lead to a higher quality of life but a lower one."

King added to the tweet: "Diversity is not our strength."

Members of Congress are condemning his recent comments.

"Everything about white supremacy and white nationalism goes against who we are as a nation," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, (R-Calif.), said, in a statement. "Steve's language is reckless, wrong, and has no place in our society. The Declaration of Independence states that 'all men are created equal.' That is a fact. It is self-evident."

Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney tweeted that King's remarks are "abhorrent and racist and should have no place in our national discourse."

"Dear Steve King (@SteveKingIA): FYI this is one reason you get bad search results when people type your name in Google," Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.), tweeted.

Ask the CEO: Crisis at the Border

"Here's the real crisis at the border: children are dying," writes DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti.

A photo of Jakelin Amei Rosmery Caal Maquin who died while in the custody of the United States Border Patrol in December 2018. / REUTERS

After watching the president conclusively prove he can read off a teleprompter, I struggled to stay awake as the 146-year-old couple (Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi) robotically read through an uninspired response.

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Trump is a Racist

In a "60 Minutes" interview, the new Democratic congresswoman said the president's words are "historic dog whistles of white supremacy."

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) is starting her term in Congress telling it like it is.

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