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97-Year-Old Black Woman Has Been an Election Day Poll Worker for 79 Years

Laura Mitnaul Wooten, honored during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's annual conference, urged Black people to vote in midterm elections.

Left to right: Chair of NNPA Dorothy R. Leavell; Laura Mitnaul Wooten; and NNPA President and CEO Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. / DIVERSITYINC

Laura Mitnaul Wooten plans to head to the polls on Nov. 6 to vote in the midterm elections, and to work, as she's done every Election Day for the past 79 years, consecutively. Wooten said that the right to vote, which so many suffered and even died for, is currently being taken for granted.

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Voting Rights Protections for Minorities in Danger: Report

Citizens "continue to suffer significant, and profoundly unequal, limitations on their ability to vote," said Catherine E. Lhamon, chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

REUTERS

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights warns that voting rights for minorities around the country are in danger. The federal government isn't doing anything to counteract it, especially since Republicans have most to lose in key midterm elections.

A report, released on Wednesday, cited strict voter ID laws; closing polling places; cutting early voting; and voting roll purges and challenges to eligibility are all impacting minority-voting rights.

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Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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White Male Candidate in Georgia Suppressing Black Votes for Black Woman Challenger by (Ab)using People with Disabilities

Stacey Abrams' opponent is afraid to compete fairly, so his buddy is orchestrating a move so offensive it's hard to believe, even for a red state.

Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp

UPDATE: Aug. 24, 2018 at 10:15 p.m. ET

On Friday, a Georgia elections board blocked a bid to close most polling places in Randolph County, a predominantly Black county, after critics called it a blatant attempt to undercut Stacey Abrams, who could become the country's first Black woman governor.

The ruling was a win for Abrams' campaign, which aims to turn out more rural Black voters.

Abrams released the following statement:

"Today is a triumph, not just for the people of Randolph County, but for every Georgian. In a predominantly Black, rural community, where public transportation is severely lacking, asking voters to travel up to 30 miles to access the ballot box would have been antithetical to our democratic values.

"I applaud Randolph County on its decision keep all nine of its polling locations open—and I recommit to ensuring that all eligible Georgians in every region of our state have access the ballot box, to cast their votes and make their voices heard."

ORIGINAL STORY

In less than 12 weeks, a historic midterm election will take place in Georgia. Black people may be kept from voting by Republicans who fear that a Black governor will be elected.

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Pro-Trump Radio Host's Rumor Blacks Bused to Alabama to Vote Slammed on Twitter

"I rode in a multicolor WV Bus and voted 34 times (30 for Jones, 3 Michelle Obama, 1 for myself of course)," a Twitter user mocked.

The 30 percent Black-voter turnout in Alabama's special senate election resulting in Democratic candidate Doug Jones' victory is unfathomable to some, like Republican candidate Roy Moore, who lost but refuses to concede, and pro-Donald Trump online radio host Bill Mitchell who has decided to spread rumors.

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Loretta Lynch: DOJ 'Stands ready' to Stop Unlawful Intimidation, Discrimination at Voting Polls

Though a Supreme Court decision will limit the amount of DOJ poll observers, the U.S. attorney general says the DOJ will "protect every eligible citizen's right to vote."

Though a Supreme Court decision will limit the amount of DOJ poll observers, the U.S. attorney general says the DOJ will "protect every eligible citizen's right to vote."

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Civil Rights Group Calls on Congress to Restore Voting Rights Act

"We have to use every possible means to ensure the integrity of this election isn't compromised by racial discrimination and intimidation."

The Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe (OSCE) recently announced it will be sending 500 observers to monitor the 2016 election. The announcement garnered praise from Wade Henderson, president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and The Leadership Conference Education Fund. Henderson also took the opportunity to call on the Supreme Court of the United States on its 2013 decision to invalidate a section of the Voting Rights Act:

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Brennan Center for Justice Fights Voter ID Laws, Voter Intimidation

The nonpartisan institute participates in court cases and fights divisive rhetoric with facts in the fight for equal voting rights for disenfranchised groups.

With Election Day drawing nearer, issues such as strict voter ID laws and the alleged case for voter fraud have been a very public debate. But some organizations focus on this battle all year round. The Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law is actively fighting to provide equal voting rights for all Americans.

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Democratic Platform Touts Diversity, Inclusion

Positions are stark contrast to GOP policy. Meanwhile, undocumented immigrants to work and speak at DNC convention.

Congressman Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md.

The final version of the Democratic Party platform released Friday includes a strong embrace of minority rights, with sections focusing on ending systemic racism, reforming the criminal justice system and supporting historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority-serving institutions.

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Supreme Court Rules Against Conservatives in Voting Rights Case

The Supreme Court rejected an interpretation of the law that would negatively impact areas with large populations of minority and young residents.

Protesters on Dec. 8, 2015, in Washington, D.C., during oral arguments for Evenwel v. Abbott | Getty Images

The Supreme Court unanimously voted Monday that states may continue to uphold the long-held "one person, one vote" rule when drawing state legislative districts.

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Dr. King, Donald Trump and The Drum Major Instinct

Dr. Martin Luther King's "The Drum Major Instinct" speech has profound lessons for today.

As we celebrate this year's Dr. Martin Luther King holiday, I'm reflecting on one of his most famous speeches: "The Drum Major Instinct."

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Federal Judges Block N.C.'s Discriminatory Voting-Rights Laws

Federal judges make it clear that North Carolina's voting-rights laws disproportionally hurt Blacks and Latinos, "whether the number is thirty or thirty-thousand."

By Daryl Hannah

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