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Rep. Steve King's Racism is Finally Making Republicans Uncomfortable

King has been stripped of his committee assignments, but is it too little, too late?

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U.S. Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) was stripped of his committee assignments in Congress by House Republicans on Monday evening. It seems the backlash from King's recent remarks on white supremacy and white nationalism finally caused the Republican Party to take action. But why are Republicans now outraged when King has been sharing his racist beliefs for years?

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Rep. Steve King's White Supremacy Remark Just Shows His True Colors

King's remarks are "abhorrent and racist and should have no place in our national discourse," tweeted Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney.

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) wants to know why white nationalists and white supremacists are getting a bad rep.

"White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?" King asked in an interview with The New York Times published on Thursday. "Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?"

The far-right lawmaker is at the forefront of supporting the Trump administration's anti-immigration policies and the push to end birthright citizenship. As a matter of fact, King credits himself with getting Trump onboard.

"Donald Trump came to Iowa as a real non-ideological candidate," King said, in the Times interview. He said he told Trump, "I market-tested your immigration policy for 14 years, and that ought to be worth something."

King has previously, on the House floor, shown a model of a 12-foot border wall he had designed.

Thursday afternoon he released a statement on Twitter "clarify" his comments on white supremacy and white nationalism.

"I want to make one thing abundantly clear; I reject those labels and the evil ideology" represented by those terms. "I am simply a Nationalist," he wrote.

"I condemn anyone that supports this evil and bigoted ideology which saw in its ultimate expression the systematic murder of 6 million innocent Jewish lives." Like the Founding Fathers, he wrote, "I am an advocate for Western Civilization's values."

But let's look at King's track record.

In the wake of the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre, consumers and employees pushed back against companies donating to King's campaign in November. He is known for his association with white nationalists, even retweeting a Nazi sympathizer.

(But residents of Iowa still re-elected him for another term.)

King endorsed, Faith Goldy, an openly white supremacist candidate for mayor of Toronto. He often praises far-right politicians and groups in other countries.

In September, during a European trip financed by From the Depths — a Holocaust memorial group — King actually met with members of a far-right Austrian party with historical ties to Nazis for an interview on their anti-Semitic propaganda website. The meeting was just a day after ending a five-day trip to Jewish and Holocaust historical sites in Poland, including the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp.

"In an interview with a website associated with the party, King declared that 'Western civilization is on the decline,' spoke of the replacement of white Europeans by immigrants and criticized Hungarian American financier George Soros, who has backed liberal groups around the world," according to The Washington Post.

In December 2017, King shared a story on Twitter written by the Voice of Europe and quoted Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán, who said, "Mixing cultures will not lead to a higher quality of life but a lower one."

King added to the tweet: "Diversity is not our strength."

Members of Congress are condemning his recent comments.

"Everything about white supremacy and white nationalism goes against who we are as a nation," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, (R-Calif.), said, in a statement. "Steve's language is reckless, wrong, and has no place in our society. The Declaration of Independence states that 'all men are created equal.' That is a fact. It is self-evident."

Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney tweeted that King's remarks are "abhorrent and racist and should have no place in our national discourse."

"Dear Steve King (@SteveKingIA): FYI this is one reason you get bad search results when people type your name in Google," Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.), tweeted.

Trump Tells Black Reporter Her Question on White Nationalism is 'Racist'

In another dog whistle to his base, Trump tried to belittle Yamiche Alcindor's valid question.

Yamiche Alcindor, a correspondent for PBS Newshour, was just trying to do her job on Wednesday during an afternoon press conference when President Trump attempted to scold her. Trump and his administration have a history of disrespecting Black women, and him calling Alcindor's question racist is an outrageous way to pander to his base.

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Purina Ends Donations to Rep. Steve King Over Recent Comments

Major corporations are pulling support over King's divisive rhetoric about race, ethnicity and immigrants.

REUTERS

Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa's campaign is losing support from companies. In the wake of the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre, consumers and employees are pushing back against companies donating to King as they are fed up with his years of racist comments and association with white nationalists, even retweeting a Nazi sympathizer.

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Republicans Try Redistricting Tactics to Gain Even More Power

GOP wants to trade valuable information for seats in Congress.

Republicans are at it yet again, trying to play with numbers to gain even more power. There is a push led by none other than Iowa Rep. Steve King to disregard undocumented immigrants in the 2020 census. According to King, "The current policy under which illegal aliens are counted in the census allows areas with many illegal aliens to elect more federal and state representatives than areas with higher populations of citizens."

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Funding for Food Stamps, Planned Parenthood Should Pay for Border Wall, Republican Rep. Says

Rep. Steve King also linked increased use of food stamps to rising obesity rates.

SCREENGRAB VIA CNN

Money to build a wall along the United States-Mexico border should be taken from funds that help poor Americans, a congressman suggested on Wednesday.

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Fox Replaces O'Reilly With a Misogynist Racist

Beloved by David Duke and the DailyStormer.com, Tucker Carlson will take O'Reilly's spot.

REUTERS/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

After numerous women came forward alleging sexual harassment at the hands of Bill O'Reilly, Fox News' parent company, 21st Century Fox, on Wednesday announced the former host would not be returning to the network.

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Lawmaker Warns Americans: 'We Can't Restore Our Civilization with Somebody Else's Babies'

Rep. Steve King's latest comments follow his statement last summer that white people contributed more to civilization than any other "sub-group of people."

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) / REUTERS

U.S. Congressman Steve King of Iowa, who doesn't shy away from openly sharing his racist views, on Sunday took to Twitter to promote the white nationalist position on immigrants, saying, "We can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies."

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