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Serena Williams Breaks Her Silence on US Open Controversy

Meanwhile, Williams' husband slams a New York Times study, which tries to discredit her claim about the treatment of women in professional tennis.

Serena Williams continues to dispute comments that she received coaching during her matchup with Naomi Osaka at the US Open final on Sept. 8.

In an interview with an Australian talk show, The Project, scheduled to air next Sunday, Williams refutes the remark her coach Patrick Mouratoglou made about gesturing to her from the stands. She denies cheating.

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Tennis Umpires Reportedly Discuss Boycotting Serena Williams' Matches

Williams standing up to sexism is creating a fear of culture change.

REUTERS

As a Black woman, and tennis superstar, Serena Williams has experienced racism and sexism in her profession, repeatedly. And now, umpires may collectively come against her for calling out sexism and boycott her matches.

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Jesse Jackson Calls Racist Serena Williams Cartoon 'Despicable'

The Herald Sun editor Damon Johnston stands by the cartoon, meanwhile the National Association of Black Journalists slams it.

Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka / YOUTUBE

UPDATE: Sept. 11, 2018 at 6:12 a.m. ET

In response to massive criticism from across the globe regarding the cartoon, Herald Sun editor Damon Johnston is backing editorial cartoonist Mark Knight.

Johnston said in a statement on Tuesday: "A champion tennis player had a mega tantrum on the world stage, and Mark's cartoon depicted that. It had nothing to do with gender or race."

But the U.S.-based National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) disagrees with the Herald Sun, and calls the cartoon "Sambo-like."

"The Sept. 10 cartoon not only exudes racist, sexist caricatures of both women, but Williams' depiction is unnecessarily Sambo-like." NABJ said in a statement. "The art of editorial cartooning is a visual dialogue on the issues of the day, yet this cartoon grossly and inaccurately depicts two women of color at the US Open, one of the grandest stages of professional sports."

ORIGINAL STORY

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. is firing back at a newspaper cartoonist for a racist depiction of Serena Williams, which perpetuates stereotypes about Black women.

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UPDATE: Serena Williams Fined $17,000 by US Open, Male Tennis Pros Have Said Worse to Umpires Without Penalty

Williams' "thief" comment to Carlos Ramos amounted to $10,000 of the imposed fines. James Blake and Andy Roddick comment on Twitter.

The US Open tournament referee's office fined Serena Williams a total of $17,000 for three code violations — $10,000 for "verbal abuse" of chair umpire Carlos Ramos, $4,000 for being warned for coaching and $3,000 for breaking her racket, according to The Associated Press. The funds will come out of her prize money of $1.85 million as the runner-up.

The $10,000 fine for "verbal abuse" is the largest fine of the U.S. Open so far.

Williams called Ramos a "thief" and demanded an apology for his accusation that she was cheating. However, James Blake tweeted that he's said worse to umpires:

Andy Roddick admits to saying worse as well.

Meanwhile, Williams continues to be subjected to both sexism and racism:

Meanwhile, Williams continues to be subjected to both sexism and racism:

UPDATE: Serena Williams to US Open Official: 'Because I'm a Woman, You're Gonna Take This Away From Me?'

Williams' "thief" comment to Carlos Ramos amounted to $10,000 of the imposed fines. James Blake and Andy Roddick comment on Twitter.

REUTERS

UPDATE: Sept. 10, 2018

The US Open tournament referee's office fined Serena Williams a total of $17,000 for three code violations — $10,000 for "verbal abuse" of chair umpire Carlos Ramos, $4,000 for being warned for coaching and $3,000 for breaking her racket, according to The Associated Press. The funds will come out of her prize money of $1.85 million as the runner-up.

The $10,000 fine for "verbal abuse" is the largest fine of the U.S. Open so far.

Williams called Ramos a "thief" and demanded an apology for his accusation that she was cheating. However, James Blake tweeted that he's said worse to umpires:

Andy Roddick admits to saying worse as well.

ORIGINAL STORY

Naomi Osaka defeated Serena Williams, 6-2, 6-4, on Saturday at the US Open women's final. But #Serena was trending on Twitter as fans reacted to a double standard in tennis.

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The man who killed tennis stars Serena and Venus Williams' half-sister only served a 12-year sentence.

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Serena Williams' Iconic Wimbledon Run Makes Her a Champion for Working Mothers

Top executives tell DiversityInc they can relate to the tennis star's return after a difficult childbirth and then missing an important milestone in her daughter's life.

REUTERS

At Wimbledon, Serena Williams, playing only her fourth tournament after returning from childbirth, reached the finals. Though Williams ultimately lost to Angelique Kerber of Germany, she climbed 153 spots in the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) ranking, putting her at no. 28 in the list published Monday.

"To all the moms out there, I was playing for you today. And I tried," Williams, 36, said on Saturday. "Angelique played really well."

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Serena Williams' Wimbledon Victory Highlights Tennis' Archaic Traditions

Serena Williams has accomplished some amazing feats. So why is her marital status still defining who she is?

Getty Images

Serena Williams married Alexis Ohanian almost a year ago, but she hasn't publicly taken his last name. That didn't stop the chair umpires at Wimbledon from addressing her as "Mrs. Williams" to reflect her marital status, even though she told the New York Times she isn't sure what she wants to be called yet.

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Serena Williams Has Every Right To Be Upset About Being Excessively Drug-Tested

She has endured racism and bias throughout her two-decade career. Enough is enough.

Sports Illustrated

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has pretty straightforward rules regarding drug testing for professional tennis players. Athletes are required to let the agency know their whereabouts for a one-hour period of their choosing every day, even if they aren't competing. Test providers also reserve the right to make unannounced visits outside the one-hour window. The player may or not be at home, and if they aren't available, it doesn't count against them.

For Serena Williams, the rules apply. However, it would appear that she is being treated different when it comes to how often she is tested versus other tennis players. On May 21st, the powerhouse tennis star expressed her increasing awareness of her testing situation via Twitter.

And this seems to be a fair assessment. So far this year, Serena has been tested five times. Williams is ranked 183rd in the world. Kelly Bush Novak, Serena's publicist, stated to Deadspin: "Over her 23-year career in tennis, Serena Williams has never tested positive for any illegal substance despite being tested significantly more than other professional tennis players, both male and female – in fact, four times more frequently than her peers..."

The irony of this situation is Williams was tested more than Maria Sharapova, Italian tennis player Sara Erran and Dan Evans, all of whom failed their drug tests and were temporarily banned from playing the sport. And if that wasn't enough, the latest incident described Williams wasn't home and the tester showed up to test her yet again. Upon realizing Williams wasn't there, he demanded to wait for her. Another interesting tidbit is Williams just stopped breastfeeding her eight-month-old daughter. Most of the drugs on the prohibited list aren't recommended for breastfeeding mothers. There is no protocol for the number of times an athlete can be tested but it does raise the question: is Williams being targeted? Given the fact that she will probably test clean, she deserves an answer.

USADA's response didn't center the controversy but instead the organization spoke to the importance of their athlete's privacy and suggested that divulging this information broke confidentiality protocol.

REUTERS

On the heels of Serena Williams' victory against Julia Görges at the French Open on Saturday, her best performance since returning from maternity leave, Inside Tennis reporter Bill Simons asked Williams a sexist question about President Donald Trump's alleged comments on Maria Sharapova's shoulders and "supermodel good looks."

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Serena Williams on Postpartum Depression: 'It's a Part of Pregnancy'

After almost dying when giving birth to her daughter Alexis Olympia, Williams is open about the struggle and triumphs of motherhood.

INSTAGRAM

Serena Williams is currently making her comeback at the French Open after giving birth to her daughter, Alexis Olympia, nine months ago. With motherhood, Williams has become an advocate for women's health by sharing intimate details of her personal life including her struggle with postpartum depression.

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REUTERS

Twenty-one white people (including seven male board members and CEO Steve Simon) of a total of 22 people in the World Tennis Association's (WTA) management made the call to boot Serena Williams from seeding for the French Open for having a baby.

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