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Viral Video Sparks Debate on Racial Disparities in How Police Use Force

A video of a white man yelling at a white cop, without physical consequences, has more than 1 million views.

Botham Jean, Jemel Roberson and Emantic Bradford Jr. were all minding their own business, not mouthing off, and they were shot dead by police. Sandra Bland questioned an officer and wound up dead in a jail cell.

So when a video of an unidentified white man spewing expletives at an officer, throwing his license at the officer, and threatening to kill the officer, without any physical consequences, started circulating on Twitter, it went viral with more than 1 million views this week.

People of color on Twitter commented that had it been them in the video, they would've had bullets in the chest by the time the truck passed:

There are studies that well document how Blacks have been treated differently by police. In the case traffic stops, whites were 57 percent more likely to be spoken to with respectful language, whereas Black drivers were 61 percent more likely to experience an exchange that was the least respectful. Officers language with the least respect included calling people, "dude, bro, boss, man, brotha, sista or chief".

FBI data found that U.S. police kill Black people at disproportionate rates: Black people accounted for 31 percent of police killing victims in 2012, even though they made up just 13 percent of the U.S. population. And 62.7 percent of unarmed people killed by police are Black.

Yet racists, and some conservatives believe the treatment is deserved because Blacks did something wrong.

For example, in Orlando's International Airport in August, a white male Trump supporter tackled to the ground by police for being a disruptive passenger knew his privilege, when he said, "You're being rough with me. You're f***ing treating me like a Black person."

Reader Question: How does the video of the white man berating the white officer make you feel?

Trial Begins for Cops Charged With Covering Up Laquan McDonald's Death

They are the first Chicago officers to face criminal "code of silence" charges.

Screenshot from ABC 7 Chicago

The trial of former Detective David March and former Officers Joseph Walsh and Thomas Gaffney of the Chicago Police Department begins today. The men are charged with conspiracy, obstruction of justice and misconduct in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

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Opinion: There's More to Lasou Kuyateh's Story Than Meets The Eye

The New York Times released a video on the bogus arrest of Lasou Kuyateh. Someone should always call out corruption and discrimination by the police, but we shouldn't be painting the devil as a choir boy to do it.

I watched the New York Times video on the bogus arrest of Lasou Kuyateh.

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Jemel Roberson's killer, a Midloathian officer, has not been named for over two weeks, and the civil rights attorney for the family says it's hiding evidence.

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Update: Illinois Task Force Rushes to Release Details That Contradict 'Security' Hat Claim

Jemel Roberson family's attorney says the task force has a habit of not disciplining, firing, or criminally charging officers in police shootings.

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The Illinois State Police Public Integrity Task Force released a preliminary report less than three days after the shooting of Jemel Roberson, Black security guard in Robbins, Ill, which contradicted what witnesses and Roberson's family attorney have said.

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Feds Take Years to File Civil Rights Charges Against Cops ​

"They don't care how long it takes because there is no one telling them they need to get it done sooner," said a former DOJ official.

The Washington Post examined over 50 civil rights cases against officers and found that charges were filed, on average, more than three years after the event.

For example, Eric Garner, who had asthma, was killed in 2014 by NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who along with others tackled him to the ground and put him in a chokehold until Garner couldn't breathe. When the officer wasn't indicted, a civil rights case was opened. There are still no charges filed, four years later.

In 2016, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review studied over 13,000 misconduct cases submitted to the Justice Department over 20 years, and found that 96 percent of cases had no charges filed.

African Americans are only about 13 percent of the population, but make up over 30 percent of people fatally shot by police.

The list of people include Walter Scott, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Tamir Rice and more.

Brittany Packett, activist and former appointed member of the Ferguson Commission and President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing has said, historically, less than one percent of the officers who shoot Black people are ever convicted of that crime.

Walter Scott, driving with a broken tail light, was shot while running away from North Charleston police officer, Michael Slager. Two years later, the officer plead guilty to violation of civil rights by acting under the color of law.

Alton Sterling was killed by Baton Rouge officers who had pinned him down and shot him in July 2016. In May 2017, federal prosecutors said they wouldn't file civil rights charges against the officers. In March 2018, Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry announced no charges would be filed either.

"The bottom line is there's no pressure," said Roy L. Austin Jr., formerly a top official in the Civil Rights Division at the Justice Department (and attorney for the family of Bijan Ghaisar, who was shot and killed by park police last November).

"They don't care how long it takes because there is no one telling them they need to get it done sooner. So they aren't concerned about the impact it may have on the community or the impact it may have on the family. That's just their way, because they are answerable to no one except their immediate bosses."

Federal investigator agencies don't have confrontations at community meetings, politicians holding them accountable with real consequences, or overwhelming angry emails.

The DOJ's statement: "It is important to understand that 'color of law' cases in particular have an extremely high burden of proof and it takes time to put together an airtight prosecution. Every single color of law case is unique and length depends on a plethora of factors, including: available evidence, the number of witnesses and subjects, local procedures, and grand jury availability."

A cumbersome process noted by approvals of witnesses and scheduling is part of the issue, but there's also an avoidance of controversy.

"There's first of all the general reluctance on the part of prosecutors to go after people in law enforcement because they consider themselves all working on the same team," said Tim Lynch, director of the Project on Criminal Justice at Cato Institute, a think-tank in Washington that advocates for smaller government.

Ronald T. Hosko, a former FBI agent and president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, which helps officers who need financial or legal assistance in such cases said of the DOJ, "They take their time. There's no rush, and I think some of that is tactical. They're trying to be thorough. But as time goes by, some of the heat is taken out of the community and then they give you the result nine months later."

Charges Dropped Against Black Boy Who Played With a Toy Gun

Zahiem Salahuddin was arrested and faced simple assault, reckless endangerment and possession of an "instrument of crime" charges just for using a toy.

Defender Association of Philadelphia

Zahiem Salahuddin, a 13-year-old 8th grade student, was playing with his friends on the basketball court in Grays Ferry, Pa., this past summer. Salahuddin had a plastic toy gun that shot an orange plastic ball. A white boy was hit with the plastic ball. It was unclear which child shot the ball that hit the other child.

Salahuddin rode his bike home later, but was stopped by men in a black pickup truck who told him he shot at a Philadelphia police officer's son. Police in marked cars then arrived and Salahuddin was arrested, charged, and spent three days in jail.

For an orange plastic ball from a $3.50 toy, he faced simple assault, reckless endangerment and possession of an "instrument of crime."

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner has informed the Defender Association of Philadelphia that his office will withdraw juvenile charges on Thursday, according to Philly.com.

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Bla​ck Girl Gets Repeatedly Punched By Cops: Video

Police use excessive force against a 14-year-old as they held her down during an arrest.

In Coral Springs, Fla., a Black female was recorded being punched by a white male cop.

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Police Get Prison Time for Framing a Black Teen

Judge shuts down requests for more leniency in sentencing: "It would have sent the wrong message to the minority community."

Screenshots of ABC 10 MIAMI broadcast

Biscayne Park Police Chief Raimundo Atesiano claimed a perfect rate of solving burglaries, by charging his subordinates with stopping people of color at the "badlands"— the border of the predominantly white suburban city.

Officers Charlie Dayoub, Raul Fernandez, and Guillermo Ravelo complied with their chief's request, and paid the price. FBI investigations uncovered it, and all officers plead guilty. Dayoub and Fernandez thought that by cooperating, they would get leniency.

But U.S. District Judge K. Michael Moore sentenced them to the maximum: one year in prison for the false arrests.

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Moving While Black: 'They think I'm stealing, I've been hearing this for 40 years,' Says Karle Robinson​

After Robinson filed a complaint, the police chief gave the excuse that they recently had car break-ins and were on high alert.

Karle Robinson, 61, a retired Army vet was finally living his dream — moving to the countryside. He bought a home in Tonganoxie, Kan., and had almost finished a grueling 12-hour move back in August, in the early hours of the morning, when police showed up, shined flashlights, and asked him to prove he lived there and cuffed him.

Welcome to the neighborhood.

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Sheriff in New Jersey Resigns After Recordings of Racist Remarks Surface

"The comments made on that recording are appalling," said Gov. Phil Murphy.

A sheriff in Bergen County, N.J., resigned on Friday after racist comments he made about Black people, and Attorney General Gurbir Grewal, were released to the public.

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Georgia police officers threw a wailing 10-year-old to the ground after he ran after them for arresting his daddy. Athens-Clarke County police were called to the home on domestic violence charges.

As the officers led the father away, the boy shouted, "Why? Why? He didn't shoot nobody."

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