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White Nationalists and Republicans Feel Dissed by Taylor Swift

Swift's alignment with human rights, LGBTQ rights, and the fight against systemic racism brings backlash.

REUTERS

UPDATE: Swift Sways an Uptick in Voter Registration That Has Never Been Seen

Taylor Swift's post did more than tick-off alt-righters. It motivated newer voters to register in a big way.

Typically, there is an uptick in voting registration that occurs right before elections, but according to Vote.org Chief Operating Officer Raven Brooks, "…this absolutely has been a massive 48-hour period for us and I would attribute it in large part to her. We would've had elevated traffic from normal because of registration deadlines happening this week, but this is an order of magnitude greater than anything we've seen to date."

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Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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Angela Rye Questions What it Would be Like Working in Trump's White House

"Should I go work for the KKK and try to help them not be so racist? Probably not," Rye stated.

The absence of diversity in the President Trump's administration has been a subject of ongoing debate.

In an interview on Thursday with "The Breakfast Club," a radio show based in New York City, Angela Rye, an attorney, political commentator and a leader of the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, implied that the predominantly white, White House is intentional.

"This is the least diverse White House in decades," Rye said. "They are definitely trying to bring it back to the real white house."

According to an analysis from The New York Times, Trump's cabinet contains more white men than that of the last six presidents. Trump's 24-member advisory body has four women and four minorities.

The radio show hosts asked Rye if Black people should aspire to work in the White House to try and bring about change.

Rye responded: "Should I go work for the KKK and try to help them not be so racist? Probably not."

Trump's racism has been well documented, from calling immigrants "animals," "criminals," and "rapists," to his "sh**hole countries" comment about African countries, to saying Maxine Waters has a "low IQ," and calling Black athletes "sons of bitches."

Related Story: If You Support Trump, You Hate Who I Am

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has said she "can't guarantee" that Trump has never used a racial epithet, yet also said the White House values diversity, and is trying to increase it.

After being pressed by reporters to give numbers of Black staffers in the West Wing, Sanders said, "I'm not going to do a count — the same way I'm not going to do a sit-down and count up the [number of Black] staffers that are in your news organizations."

In April, the White House drew backlash for its lack of diversity after releasing a photo of spring interns who appeared to be all white.

Obama's White House had seven women and 10 minorities in his first 22-member Cabinet, including Valerie Jarrett, a senior advisor who sat in the West Wing, in many meetings including the situation room.

That's 32% female and 45% minorities for Obama, and 17% female and minorities for Trump.

Of Trump's White House: "There's not a single Black person shaping policy, sitting in the White House," said Rye. "Steven Miller, a bigot, is shaping immigration policy."

Federal Judge Rejects Trump's Plea to Detain Children Longer

Children's counsel said Trump made up the family separation requirement.

RETUERS

U.S. District Court Judge Dolly Gee of California said in her decision Monday not to amend Flores v. Reno and that "absolutely nothing" prevents President Trump from reconsidering their current blanket policy of family detention. And, Tuesday is the deadline for the administration to reunite children under five with families — but only half will have that opportunity.

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​Study Confirms What we all Know: Trump Is a Racist

Americans across the aisle and across the nation are united in that truth.

A lot has been said around about what President Trump is or isn't, and Blacks, immigrants and women especially have had strong opinions about his agenda toward anyone who isn't a rich, white male. But a Quinnipiac University study released numbers to back it up.

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Trump to Reverse Obama-Era Guidelines on Considering Race in College Admissions

Trump's efforts to rescind the affirmative action guidelines just add to the trend to erase landmark accomplishments of the Obama legacy.

The Trump administration plans to toss an Obama-era guideline that encourages colleges and universities to consider race as a way of promoting diversity.

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REUTERS

On Friday, the Trump administration eliminated the Obama administration's protections over transgender inmates, putting a vulnerable population back at risk for sexual abuse/assault. Housing and bathroom assignments were originally to match up with gender identity, but now will be appropriated by biological sex.

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Chicago Torturers 'Could have been Obama's children,' Tweets Teacher

The West Virginia high school teacher has been suspended for her racist Twitter rants.

Mary Durstein (l) / Obama photo via REUTERS

A high school teacher in West Virginia has been suspended after her personal Twitter account was found filled with racially charged tweets. Mary Durstein was suspended, with pay, on Monday, according to the Herald-Dispatch.

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President Obama Explains How He Navigates Racial Topics

Says people "sometimes have blind spots … but that doesn't mean that they're not open to learning and caring about equality and justice … there's goodness in the majority of people."

President Barack Obama on Monday night said racism today is "rarely the overt Klansman-style racism and typically has more to do" with discrimination based on race, including unconscious biases.

In an exit interview of sorts with The Daily Show's Trevor Noah, Obama was asked a personal question about how he has managed to navigate questions about race, both as an individual of a mixed racial background and as the president.

"In and around race, when you are a person who has a platform, when you are in a space where you are engaging with people, it is often difficult to navigate and skirt that line between speaking your mind and sharing your true opinions on race, whilst at the same time not being seen to alienate some of the people you are talking to — because if you are a white person who's speaking about race, then you are just a person who is interested in race. If you are a person of color who's speaking about it, then it's like, 'Oh, the Black thing's starting again,'" Noah said in the prelude to his question, to which Obama chuckled in agreement. "How did you navigate that through your two terms?"

"My general theory is that, if I was clear in my own mind about who I was, comfortable in my own skin, and had clarity about the way in which race continues to be this powerful factor in so many elements of our lives, but that it is not the only factor in so many aspects of our lives, that we have by no means overcome the legacies of slavery and Jim Crow and colonialism and racism, but that the progress we've made has been real and extraordinary," Obama said. "If I'm communicating my genuine belief that those who are not subject to racism can sometimes have blind spots or lack appreciation of what it feels to be on the receiving end of that — but that doesn't mean that they're not open to learning and caring about equality and justice — and that I can win them over, because there's goodness in the majority of people. I always felt that if I really knew that and I just communicated it as clearly as I could, that I'd be okay."

He added: "Another way of saying this is, there's not been a time in my public life or my presidency where I feel as if I have had to bite my tongue. There have been times in my public life where I've said, 'How do I say this diplomatically, how do I say this … in a way that it's received.' So there have been very few instances where I've said, 'Well, that was racist. You are racist.' There've been times where I've said, 'You know, you might not of taken into account the ongoing legacy of racism in why we have so many Black men incarcerated. And since I know that you believe in the Constitution and believe in justice and believe in liberty, how about if we try this?'

"Now, some might say, 'Well, you're not speaking fully truth to power because of that diplomacy,' but I don't think that trying to appeal to the better angels of our nature, as Lincoln put it, is somehow compromised. There may be times where you just have to call things out and name names. But the challenge we face today when it comes to race is rarely the overt Klansman-style racism and typically has more to do with the fact that, you know, people got other stuff they want to talk about and it's sort of uncomfortable. It's somebody not getting called back for an interview — although it's never explicit — or it's who gets the TV acting job, the actress who doesn't quite look the part, and what does that mean? And in that environment, where you're not talking necessarily about cut-and-dried racist behavior, but rather about the complex ways in which society is working these issues through, trying to reach folks in ways that they can hear I think is important.

"And, I would add, everybody's got a different role to play. If Chris Rock's doing stand-up, then there is a benefit to him doing something that is different from the president of the United States doing something. For one thing, you know, he doesn't have to edit his language quite as carefully because I am still subject to, you know, some restraints," Obama joked.

Related Story: Obama: 'Absolutely' Faced Racism in White House

The president added that while he looks forward to spending some quality time with his wife after he leaves the White House next month, he intends to remain engaged and "paying attention" to what transpires during the next administration and will speak up if he feels people's rights are being violated.

"I don't anticipate that I suddenly just vanish, but I think it's important to give the incoming administration the space," he said, adding, "If I think core values of ours are being threatened, if I thought that a Muslim registry was being set up that violates the Constitution and violates who we are … I might have to say something about that. If I saw Dream Act kids, young people who were brought here as children who are for all intents and purposes Americans, suddenly being rounded up contrary to who we are as a nation of laws and a nation if immigrants, I may have to say something about that."

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Republican Rep Nominee Likens Obamas to Monkeys

Fellow Republicans have called on Dan Johnson to drop out of the race after numerous racially charged Facebook posts — but he vowed to "make Kentucky great again."

A Republican candidate for Kentucky's House of Representatives has expressed no remorse for a series of racially charged posts on his Facebook page — including several likening the Obamas to monkeys. Dan Johnson, the man in question, recently said he is in fact the candidate who will "make Kentucky great again."

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Implicit Bias Training for Police Gaining Attention

The subject has come up during the presidential campaign following slew of police-related shootings.

During the first presidential debate late last month, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton was asked whether she felt implicit bias was present among police. Her response: "I think implicit bias is a problem for everyone, not just police."

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Sharp Split in Attitudes Toward #BLM Between Political Parties

Is the BLM movement destined to be as successful as the Civil Rights Movement? Early results say yes.

Photo by Shutterstock

A new poll found a sharp contrast between Democrats and Republicans when it comes to the Black Lives Matter movement.

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