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REUTERS

Steve Bannon, former White House chief strategist, said that slain civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would be "proud" of what President Donald Trump has done for Blacks and Latinos in the U.S.

Bannon was the CEO of Trump's presidential campaign. Trump gained supporters by calling Mexicans rapists, committing to building a wall between Mexico and the U.S., allowing Black people to be physically assaulted at his rallies and lightly disavowing the support of white supremacists.

"Martin Luther King ... he would be proud of what Donald Trump has done for [the] Black and Hispanic working class, okay?" Bannon said on "This Week" Sunday.

On Sunday, King's daughter, Bernice King, CEO of The King Center, re-tweeted a post from The Washington Post reporter Eugene Scott who referenced a similar claim Bannon had made previously. She included a response, simply stating: “Absolutely not."

In May, King tweeted:

Bannon said in March at an event with far-right French politicians that they should "wear" accusations of racism "as a badge of honor."

Let them call you racist. Let them call you xenophobes," he said. “Let them call you nativists. Wear it as a badge of honor. Because every day, we get stronger and they get weaker."

Bannon said on Sunday that he was “talking specifically about Donald Trump and his policies."

“His economic nationalism doesn't care about your race, your religion, your gender, your sexual preference," he said.

The Trump administration's “zero tolerance" immigration policy is currently separating children of undocumented immigrants from their mothers and fathers.

King tweeted on Sunday:

The King Center Announces Route For March For Humanity And Tribute

Hundreds of people will march from the Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church to the Georgia State Capitol, Liberty Plaza, ending with a tribute led by national and local celebrities.

REUTERS

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (The King Center), announces the route for the March of Humanity commemorating the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination and funeral.

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We White People Need to Own This

Martin Luther King has been dead for 50 years and Donald Trump is our president. Who is responsible?

REUTERS

We will be deluged by Martin Luther King articles and columns today. Some will be excellent, like the one Rev. Jesse Jackson wrote. But most will be saccharine sweet and not say what needs to be said.

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Dodge Blasted for Distastefully Using MLK's Words in Super Bowl Ad

The ad from a company whose leadership includes little diversity featured a portion of Dr. King's sermon though omitted the part in which he also admonished pressure from advertisers.

Dodge received swift rebuke for its Super Bowl ad Sunday night in what many critics said was a distasteful use of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to sell cars and tone-deaf to Dr. King's message.

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Pro-Trump Students Mock MLK with Trump Hat Photo

A student political group at the University of South Florida posted the photo on social media, spurring controversy.

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MLK Monument on Stone Mountain Meets Resistance

Civil rights organizations ask governor to stop plans, while defenders of the Confederacy call monument "disrespectful."

By Sheryl Estrada

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MLK Day Celebrations Turn Into More Protests

Activists all over the country took the opportunity to hold protests on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, pointing out that Dr. King's dream remains far from a reality.

Via Michael Appleton for The New York Times

By Julissa Catalan

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Rodgers Leads MLK Day of Service Initiative

Marty Rodgers, one of the men behind the legislation that made MLK Day a day of service, now directs the participation of more than 2,000 Accenture employees in service projects around Washington, D.C.

By Sheryl Estrada

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SLIDESHOW: Living Through the Words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

With civil rights at the forefront this year, one can only imagine the powerful words Dr. King would deliver to protesters nationwide.

This year, perhaps more than ever, civil rights are at the forefront on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

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Dr. King's Dream Failing? Where Racial Divides Remain

Fifty years after the March on Washington, where have racial gaps widened and where have they narrowed?

By Chris Hoenig

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Race in America: Views on Racial Disparities 50 Years Later

Five decades after Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, why does racial equality remain an elusive goal?

By Chris Hoenig

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Remembering Four Little Girls Killed in Birmingham Church Bombing 50 Years Ago

Siblings, relatives return to the site of the blast to honor the victims.

By Chris Hoenig

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