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​​Kavanaugh Supporter Compares Attempted Rape Claims to 'Rough Horseplay'

The former law clerk for Clarence Thomas joins in the belittling and discrediting of Christine Blasey Ford as she tries to tell her story of sexual assault.

Carrie Severino, spokesperson for the Judicial Crisis Network, questioned Christine Blasey Ford's accusations of Brett Kavanaugh's behavior in high school saying 35-year-old memories could be of just "rough horseplay" instead of attempted rape.

When a CNN anchor challenged Severino's description of Ford's account as a range of behaviors from boorish rough horseplay to attempted rape, Severino backtracked saying it was attempted rape that Ford had alleged.

Severino additionally said that Ford's "perception is one story," seemingly that can be refuted, while the "[Kavanaugh] says it didn't happen at all, so under any interpretation… he says he was not at a party and it didn't happen period."

Judicial Crisis Network has spent at least $4.5 million in ad buys to confirm Kavanaugh, with plans to spend more, and Severino is the former law clerk for Clarence Thomas. Other Kavanaugh allies publicized letters from two former girlfriends to attest to his character.

The discrediting of Ford's story started with Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley's statement about the allegations being part of "Democrats' tactics" concerning Kavanaugh's confirmation process.

President Trump recently called Kavanaugh a "great gentleman," and said: "I feel so badly for him that he's going through this," Trump said. "This is not a man that deserves this."

He also called the process of investigating the allegation of sexual assault a "little delay," and said it was "ridiculous" to think that Kavanaugh might withdraw his nomination.

Some Republican senators such as Orrin Hatch of Utah and John Cornyn of Texas questioned the credibility of the woman who claims to have undergone sexual assault and subsequent trauma, proven by therapist notes.

Cornyn said he was concerned by "gaps" in the account: "The problem is, Dr. Ford can't remember when it was, where it was or how it came to be."

Hatch said he saw "lots of reasons" not to believe Ford's accusation.

"He is a person of immense integrity," the senator said of Kavanaugh. "I have known him for a long time. He has always been straightforward, honest, truthful and a very, very decent man."

"They just don't get it" became a popular way to describe senators' reaction to sexual violence, wrote Anita Hill, in a recent op-ed in the New York Times.

Hill, who famously was publicly discredited when coming forward about Clarence Thomas, said, "With years of hindsight, mounds of evidence of the prevalence and harm that sexual violence causes individuals and our institutions, as well as a Senate with more women than ever, 'not getting it' isn't an option for our elected representatives. In 2018, our senators must get it right."

Woman Accusing Brett Kavanaugh of Sexual Assault Willing to Testify Before Senate Panel

Lawyer said of her client: "She believes, that but for his inebriation and his inability to take her clothes off, he would have raped her."

REUTERS TV

Christine Blasey Ford will relive trauma from more than 30 years ago as her alleged attacker, Brett Kavanaugh, sits through confirmation hearings, which could place him in a seat of power over law for a generation.

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UPDATE: Time's Up Wants CBS to Pay Up Using Moonves' $120 Million Severance

It's time for CBS to put it's money where it's mouth is.

Time's Up, the organization founded in early 2018, urged CBS to change current practices and donate the entirety of ex-CEO Leslie Moonves' severance package to "organizations that address sexual harassment and workplace safety."

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UPDATE: CBS CEO, Finally,  Resigns From Network After Allegations of Sexual Misconduct Are Exposed

Given the fact the network was slow to move in the first place, is it enough?

UPDATE: September 12, 2018

Time's Up, the organization founded in early 2018, urged CBS to change current practices and donate the entirety of ex-CEO Leslie Moonves' severance package to "organizations that address sexual harassment and workplace safety."

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This story continues to unfold. Argento initially denied accusations outright, saying "I have never had any sexual relationship with Bennett," but since text messages surfaced of her telling a friend "the horny kid jumped me … I had sex with him it felt weird," Argento has changed her response. Now, she's reporting that she was violated by Bennett.

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UPDATE: Sept. 6, 2018

This story continues to unfold. Argento initially denied accusations outright, saying "I have never had any sexual relationship with Bennett," but since text messages surfaced of her telling a friend "the horny kid jumped me … I had sex with him it felt weird," Argento has changed her response. Now, she's reporting that she was violated by Bennett.

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In a statement distributed by her Italian lawyer, Asia Argento claims she and her then boyfriend Anthony Bourdain decided to answer Bennett's plea for financial help on the condition that Bennett would no longer intrude on their lives. She said that she and Bennett were only friends.

"I am deeply shocked and hurt by having read news that is absolutely false. I have never had any sexual relationship with Bennett," Argento said.

She included that it was an "exorbitant request of money" (reportedly $3.5 million) to her following her exposure following the Weinstein accusations.

Bennett's attorney Gordon K. Sattro said asked for the media to "give our client some time and space. Jimmy is going to take the next 24 hours, or longer, to prepare his response. We ask that you respect our client's privacy during this time."

The Times reported they received the documents "through encrypted email by an unidentified party," and that they included "a selfie dated May 9, 2013, of the two lying in bed."

A spokesperson for The New York Times told Reuters: "We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting, which was based on verified documents and multiple sources."

#MeToo Leader's Scandal Exposed: Asia Argento Paid Her Own Accuser

Movement advocates say don't let it discredit the cause.

UPDATE: Aug. 21, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. ET

Argento Says She Never Had a Sexual Relationship with Bennett

The New York Times stands by its report.

In a statement distributed by her Italian lawyer, Asia Argento claims she and her then boyfriend Anthony Bourdain decided to answer Jimmy Bennett's plea for financial help on the condition that Bennett would no longer intrude on their lives. She said that she and Bennett were only friends.

"I am deeply shocked and hurt by having read news that is absolutely false. I have never had any sexual relationship with Bennett," Argento said.

She included that it was an "exorbitant request of money" (reportedly $3.5 million) to her following her exposure following the Weinstein accusations.

Bennett's attorney Gordon K. Sattro said asked for the media to "our client some time and space. Jimmy is going to take the next 24 hours, or longer, to prepare his response. We ask that you respect our client's privacy during this time."

The Times reported they received the documents "through encrypted email by an unidentified party," and that they included "a selfie dated May 9, 2013, of the two lying in bed."

A spokesperson for The New York Times told Reuters: "We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting, which was based on verified documents and multiple sources."

ORIGINAL STORY

Asia Argento, a prominent #MeToo movement figure that assisted in the take down of Harvey Weinstein, has come under fire for her own past alleged sex scandal, with a male actor who was 17-years-old at the time (Argento was 37).

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The Board That Les Moonves is Chair of Decides to Do Nothing Much About Six Women’s Allegations Against Les Moonves. Who Coulda Guessed?

#MeToo? Not in the 21 percent women (including the founder's daughter) board and 100 percent male executive team. CBS, patriarchy and nepotism much?

REUTERS TV

CBS Corp.'s board of directors is allowing CEO Leslie Moonves to remain at the helm of the company amid allegations of sexual misconduct.

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R Kelly's Song 'I Admit' Still Leaves the Question for Fans, For Society: Do Black Women Matter?

Black women discarded by lyrics, touts of Kelly's artistry and victimization and industry silence.

REUTERS

R. Kelly's release of a song that "confesses" relationships with underage women, sexual abuse, dyslexia and more has sparked debate on social media between those who love him and those who think he should be in jail.

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Waitress Who Body-slammed Male Groper Says, 'We Deal With a Lot'

"Despite the #Metoo movement forcing industries to re-examine their sexual-predatory behavior towards women, the service industry is lagging behind."

YouTube

The last thing any woman wants to deal with is the uninvited attention of a man's hand mysteriously finding its way onto her hind parts — especially if you're a waitress just trying to finish your shift in the middle of the night. Ask a Savannah, Ga., waitress, weighing in at 115 pounds, who slammed her male fondler to the ground inside of a pizzeria after he unjustifiably grabbed her backside while on the job.

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Men Who Fear Being Viewed as Incompetent More Likely to Sexually Harass Subordinates: Study

"These findings suggest that sexual harassment may not only come from a place of entitlement, but also from a place of insecurity," according to the authors.

REUTERS

Men who feel their "social status is threatened" are more likely to sexually harass their female subordinates, according to newly published research. However, the same cannot be said for women, note the authors of "Feeling Powerful but Incompetent: Fear of Negative Evaluation Predicts Men's Sexual Harassment of Subordinates."

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