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Florida Police Shoot and Kill Black Mental Health Patient

A Broward Circuit judge designated Jarvis Randall as a "violent offender of special concern" in February but noted he "DOES NOT pose a danger."

Broward Sheriff's Office deputies shot and killed, Jarvis Randall, a Black psychiatric patient after he allegedly charged at the officers with broken glass.

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Update: Four Years or More in Prison for White Man Who Shot at Black Teen

"This will affect my son forever," said Brennan Walker's mother.

FOX NEWS

After a jury convicted Jeffrey Ziegler last month of assault with intent to do bodily harm and a felony firearm count for shooting at a Black teen in Rochester Hills, Mich., he was sentenced to four to 10 years in prison.

On Tuesday, Ziegler appeared in front of a judge at the Oakland County court, who sentenced him to a minimum of two years for each charge. The original charge, assault with intent to murder, would've carried a life sentence. Now he'll be eligible for parole after four years.

Related Story: UPDATE: Man Found Guilty of a Lesser Charge for Shooting at Black Teen

Meanwhile, Lisa Wright, mother of Brennan Walker, the victim, said her son is in therapy indefinitely.

"This will affect my son forever," she said.

"He almost took the life of another human being," assistant prosecutor Kelly Collins said. "That will forever stay with Brennan — forever. His perception of strangers, his perception of other people, his perception of the world."

Jeffrey Zeigler apologized before he was sentenced Tuesday in Oakland County court, and apologized to Wright, saying, "I have full remorse and regret and I wish I could change something, but we can't go back in time."

She doesn't believe him. She told the judge she thinks Ziegler is sad because of the media attention.

As he was escorted out of the courtroom, Zeigler smiled and waved at his wife, and friends and relatives shouted, "We love you, Jeff."

Ziegler and his wife clearly reacted to the teen's race in the April 12 shooting. Ziegler referred to Walker in an interview with a sheriff's deputy after the shooting as "that colored kid" at his front door; and his wife's report to the police was, "A Black male was trying to break into her house and her husband chased after him into the yard."

Related Story: White Man Who Shot at Lost Black Teen and Called Him 'Colored' Stands Trial

Ziegler lied and said he tripped and that's what caused his gun to fire, when his own home security system video showed him pausing, taking aim and firing at the fleeing teen.

Walker, then age 14, had missed his bus to school that morning and came to the Zeigler's door for help. After his wife screamed, Zeigler fired a shotgun at the teen, but missed him.

"I was scared," Walker had testified in October. "I was trying to tell them that I was trying to get to high school, but they weren't listening."

Walker had literally run for his life. "I turned back and I saw him aiming at me... I was trying to run away faster and I heard a gunshot," he said on the stand.

Zeigler's attorney Robert Morad, who said his client suffers from PTSD and injuries from being a Detroit firefighter for 23 years, said outside the courtroom,"We will be discussing a possible appeal."

Meanwhile, Walker and his family don't leave the house much anymore. "We moved to Rochester Hills to live in a better place, a safe place," Wright said. "But, when a safer place doesn't want you there, I don't know how to process that."

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Jeffersontown police have released the names of both victims in Wednesday's shooting: Maurice E. Stallard, 69, and Vicki Lee Jones, 67 were identified by the coroner's office.

Stallard was the father of Louisville's Chief Racial Equity Officer, and Jones was a woman on her way from her home, just blocks away, to pick up some groceries.

Gregory Bush, the shooter in custody, has a criminal past, as well as one wrought with mental illness and racial hostility.

His ex-wife, who filed for protection against Bush, was reportedly called a "ni**er bit**" by him, according to court records.

Bush's social media pages say that he once was married to a Black woman, and had a Black son. He once posted: "All lives matter, not just Black lives."

In addition, posts were found criticizing Colin Kaepernick and other NFL players for kneeling protests, and the media for allegedly not covering a mass shooting committed by a Sudanese immigrant. Bush also shared a petition urging the governor to prevent confederate statues from being removed.

Bush has been charged with assault numerous times, and also with menacing a 15-year-old girl in a movie theater bathroom and said, he "thought we were family."

He posted about his diagnosis and how it had impacted his life as well saying, " [ I ] worked most of my life and battled mental illness throughout my life…I'm lucky I made it this far with all the trouble I've caused myself when I get off my medicine."

His wife wrote that in 2003 Bush had been diagnosed "paranoid and was put on medication," according to court records. "He stopped taking his medication."

Details about his history include court-ordered mental health treatment, being reported as a "suicide risk" by police, and being ordered to not own any weapons.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said of the shooting: "Our city and our future have no room for anyone who looks at their fellow human beings with hate or discrimination."

He also took the opportunity to call on state and federal officials to address the gun violence "epidemic" in this country and the need for improved mental health care.

"The hard fact is that most violent crimes are committed with guns, and guns fall under the jurisdiction of the state and federal governments," Fischer said.

"Every time someone takes a gun and creates a tragedy, what's the response?" asked Fischer. "From too many of our leaders, the ones who have the power to make our country safer, our city safer, our schools and churches and groceries safer, they act as if nothing can be done. That doesn't sound like the United States of America to me — the most powerful, most resourceful country in the world. Why do we pretend that we're helpless?"

Of the loss of his colleague's father: "This one is especially painful because, as has been reported, one of the victims was the father of a member of my team," Fischer said.

A Kroger employee has started a fundraiser to help both families. Jones' family started a GoFundMe page to help long-distance relatives travel to Louisville for her funeral. Her brother just died two weeks ago.

Related Story: Father of Chief Racial Equity Officer in Louisville Murdered by White Man

Black Men Get Candid About Mental Health

Celebrities are seeking out ways to fight the mental health stigma within the Black community.

YOUTUBE

Studies show Black men are particularly concerned about the stigma of mental illness, and apprehensive about seeking help.

Wizdom Powell, PhD, MPH, director of the Health Disparities Institute at University of Connecticut Health and associate professor of psychiatry, said that men of color are generally discouraged from seeking any kind of help, including help with mental health issues.

But some brave men in the very public eye, have decided to tackle the issue hoping to change the way the Black community views getting help.

Earlier this month, Chance the Rapper donated $1 million to help improve mental health services in Chicago. Six mental health providers in Cook County will each get $100,000 grants, and SocialWorks is starting an initiative called "My State of Mind" to help connect people with treatment.

NFL player Brandon Marshall, who struggles with Borderline Personality Disorder, started a nonprofit Project 375.org to help eradicate stigma, increase awareness and improve training and care for youth. He wrote a powerful essay called "The Stigma," last year, where he was candid with his own battles and some of his coping mechanisms that included meditation and journaling.

The conversations around health are happening in other ways, in interviews, on albums, online and on screen.

Jay-Z has come out in interviews to talk about how the experience of therapy helped him grow as a man, overcoming situations, which he describes in his lyrics.

Related Story: Black Men Defy the Racist Stigma That Says Their Trauma is Their Own Fault

On his album "4:44," he released a mini documentary "Footnotes for MaNyfaCedGod," where he gathered a group of Black men to talk candidly about therapy, self-care, and mental health awareness.

He also advocated for therapy at younger ages and in schools.

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson posted about his mother's suicide attempt on social media and went on "Oprah's Master Class" on OWN to discuss his own depression and how important it is to know that you are not alone in your struggles.

Related Story: Taraji P Henson on Mental Health: We're Demonized for Expressing Rage for Traumas We've Been Through

Rapper Kid Cudi, in posting about and seeking help for his anxiety struggles back in 2016, inspired users on social media to start the #YouGoodMan hashtag, which became a place for Black men to share knowledge and their stories with support.

Primetime TV shows are breaking the silence in the Black community as well.

Sterling K. Brown star of "This Is Us," Romany Malco Jr. of "A Million Little Things," and Kendrick Sampson and Issa Rae of "Insecure" all struggle on screen with issues and survive.

These actors are tackling conversations around getting help for depression, suicide ideation, panic attacks, and trauma — many issues that plague the Black community based on everyday living experiences.

And talking about it helps.

Marcus and Markeiff Morris, twin brothers and NBA players talked to ESPN about their struggles with depression and trauma from growing up in a violent neighborhood. Marcus Morris, who shared their story, encouraged others, "If you have depression, you should be trying to get rid of it instead of bottling it up and letting it weigh on you and weigh on you and weigh on you."

Markeiff, initially agreed to speak about his illness, but bowed out, possibly a sign that he's not quite ready. There are many men like him.

Hopefully, the more men that come forward to advocate and share, the more others will feel empowered to do the same.

Reader Question: Why do you think Black men struggle to speak openly about their how stress impacts their mental health?

Taraji P. Henson on Mental Health: We're Demonized for Expressing Rage for Traumas We've Been Through

Henson opens a foundation to erase the stigma within the Black community regarding mental health.

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"I'm here to tell you that when they [say] cut and the cameras go away, I go home to real problems just like everybody else," Taraji P. Henson said in an interview with Variety.

To address the lack of treatment for mental health issues in the African American community, Henson has launched the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, named after her late father, who suffered from mental health issues as well.

The foundation aims to erase stigma in the Black community, and increase services in schools and prisons, as well as the number of Black providers.


After Henson's son's father was murdered in 2003, she had to find treatment for her son, which she said was difficult because non-Black professionals wouldn't get far because he didn't trust them. He wouldn't open up, and he felt guilty.

"We don't talk about it in our community; it's taboo, it's looked upon as a weakness or we're demonized for expressing rage for traumas we've been through," she said.

Blacks are the least likely to seek mental health treatment, and have less trust due to a history of being misdiagnosed. Less than 6 percent of doctors of psychology are Black.

Henson said, "I have a lot of white friends and … they say, 'You don't talk to anybody? Girl, I'm going to see my shrink every Thursday at 3 o'clock.' So I was like why don't we do that in our community?"

Understanding the influence they have, and recognizing the need, Henson and other celebrities of color have openly discussed mental health.

Jennifer Lewis, star of "Black-ish," who was diagnosed 25 years ago with bipolar disorder and advocates for better mental health, said: "We are as sick as our secrets, and it's time for people to come together, to reach out to those who are hiding in dark rooms, reach out to those who are afraid to take the next step, reach out to those who want to be better and don't know how to."

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, who did not get his football dream off the ground, and also experienced the trauma of watching his mother walk into oncoming traffic and saving her, said those experiences changed him.

Of his depression, Johnson said, "I found that, with depression, one of the most important things you could realize is that you're not alone. I wish I had someone at that time who could just pull me aside and [say], 'Hey, it's gonna be okay.'"

Rapper Wale has said of his health, "I was depressed not being where I wanna be in my career when I've put the work in. I wasn't sleeping. I was drinking all day, and I didn't have anyone to go to. I couldn't fight it. Those are some of the demons I talk about on the album."

Starbucks is Being Sued for Discrimination Against Former Transgender Employee

"A welcoming place for everyone," CEO Kevin Johnson said of the May diversity training. Managers still didn't get the memo.

REUTERS

Two months after the highly publicized, and eventual flop, of Starbucks' diversity training, a transgender employee with the company for nine years has filed a lawsuit because her manager in Fresno, Calif., made her work days intolerable.

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J​udge Asked to Create Mental Health Fund for Migrant Children

The government "must establish a fund to pay for professional mental health counseling, which will be used to treat children who are suffering from severe trauma as a result of their forcible separation from their parents," said the ACLU.

REUTERS

(Reuters) - A civil rights group asked a federal judge last week to order the government to provide mental health counseling for the around 2,000 immigrant children separated from their parents by officials at the U.S.-Mexican border.

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Mexican Man in ICE Custody Dies by Apparent Suicide

Efrain De La Rosa, 40, took his own life, according to a preliminary investigation.

REUTERS

A Mexican man being held in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody has died, seemingly by suicide, ICE announced Thursday. He is the eighth person to die in ICE's custody this year.

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Detention Centers and Separations Equals Trauma for Immigrant Children, Say Experts

Trump's policies are putting children at risk for abnormal development and long-term behavioral health problems

REUTERS

There is no doubt that the immigrant children being put in detention centers and separated from their parents and loved ones will not forget these experiences for the rest of their lives. Dr. Colleen Kraft, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, who last month condemned the practice of separating families as "government-sanctioned child abuse," said these kids are also at risk for abnormal development.

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What do the Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain Suicides Mean in the Workplace?

How many of your employees or colleagues at work are struggling with mental health issues? Do you know? Have you even considered it?

By Carol Glazer, President of the National Organization on Disability (NOD)

The tragic and untimely deaths by suicide of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain should serve as a reminder that even the most talented people, who appear to be holding it all together better than many of us, also can be affected by mental illness, a leading cause of suicide.

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Five Questions with Dr. Ronald Copeland of Kaiser Permanente on Addressing Mental Health in the Workplace

Depression and other mental health conditions are a leading cause of workplace disability in the form of lost productivity because of how common they are–1 out of every 5 people are suffering from a mental health condition at any given time–and because they tend to occur when people are young.

Originally Published by National Organization on Disability.

Kaiser Permanente's focus on reducing mental health stigma for consumers and members also applies to its own employees. The National Organization on Disability caught up with Ron Copeland, MD, to understand how to best create a supportive and inclusive workplace for people who are experiencing a mental health condition.

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