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Sen. Kamala Harris Pays Homage to Shirley Chisholm

"Like Shirley, I believe that to restore confidence and trust in our institutions and leaders, we need to speak truth," Harris said of Chisholm.

TWITTER

Kamala Harris' announcement on "Good Morning America" on Martin Luther King Jr. Day was a stark reminder of what happened 47 years ago this week in a race for the presidency.

Harris is standing on the shoulders of Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman to run for president, and 10 other Black women.

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Sen. Kamala Harris: 'I am running for president of the United States'

"Let's do this together," said the Howard University alum and member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

TWITTER

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) announced on Martin Luther King Jr. Day that she will be running for president in 2020.

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Black Former NFL Player Defends His Daughter Against White Predator​

"I caught him at the apartment over there and we just had a good conversation," ex-NFL player Tony Beckham said.

Screenshot from WPLG ABC 10

Former NFL player for the Tennessee Titans and Detroit Lions, Tony Beckham, caught a white man fondling himself outside of his daughter's window at 6:40 a.m. Monday (she had just exited the shower to get dressed), and runs outside, tackles him, his wife calls the police, and the man is arrested.

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Louisville to Rename Airport After Muhammad Ali

Though air travel once terrified Ali, he faced his fears to win a gold medal at the Olympics.

The Louisville Regional Airport Authority Board voted unanimously on Wednesday to rename the city's airport after "The Greatest" — Muhammad Ali. The new name is Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport.

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Honorary Titles Revoked From DNA Pioneer James Watson Over Racist Views

Nobel Prize recipient, James Watson, still maintained debunked notions of Blacks and inferiority.

Dr. James Watson at the CSHL.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York State has revoked every title and honor given to 90-year-old DNA pioneer, James Watson.

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Chief Meteorologist Fired After Using Racial Slur in Reference to MLK

Jeremy Kappell claims it was a mistake. "Unfortunately, I spoke a little too fast when I was referencing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.," he said.

During a Friday night broadcast, meteorologist Jeremy Kappell referred to a park in downtown Rochester, N.Y., named after slain civil rights hero Martin Luther King as "Martin Luther Coon Park."

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Black Parents on Obama Cradling Their Newborn: 'The Most Pivotal Moment' of Our Lives

In the midst of separation and hate in the current administration, the 44th president shows that the people of this country are what presidents should stay connected to.

Twitter

A newborn baby started out her new year with an expected greeting from former President Barack Obama.

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Muslim Youth Groups Clean Up National Parks Amid Government Shutdown

"Service to our nation and cleanliness are important parts of Islam," said Dr. Madeel Abdullah, president of The Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association.

Twitter @MKA_DC/ Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association

A group of teen boys and young Muslim men in multiple cities are cleaning up the nation's parks and memorials because Trump's government shutdown over his border wall has debilitated the National Park Service.

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Tennessee Governor Grants Full Clemency to Cyntoia Brown

"Imposing a life sentence on a juvenile that would require her to serve at least 51 years before even being eligible for parole consideration is too harsh," said Gov. Bill Haslam.

Cyntoia Brown, a sex trafficking victim who was sentenced to life in prison for killing a man who picked her up for sex when she was 16 years old, was granted executive clemency by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

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Rutgers University Makes History With New Law School Dean

Kimberly Mutcherson has broken through the glass ceiling in every way at Rutgers University.

Kimberly Mutcherson, a brilliant bioethicist and health law scholar, has made history by becoming the first woman, first African-American and first LGBTQ person to be named co-dean of Rutgers Law School in Camden, N.J.

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Texas County Swears In Record Number of Black Women Judges

17 new Black female judges were sworn in and they're planning to change the system that has disproportionately criminalized people of color.

Twitter

Black women made history in Harris County, Texas as they were elected as judges with aspirations to change the face (and reach) of justice.

"The people said it was time for a change," said Germaine Tanner, one of the women elected.

"We can lead here in Harris County. We can lead in the state of Texas," LaShawn Williams said.

"For black women particularly, we take a seat at the table and things change. For us in this situation it will change in terms of criminal justice reform, health care, these are the kinds of cases that will come before us and really impact our community."

Harris County now has a total of 19 Black women serving as judges — 17 are first timers and two ran for re-election.

On Jan. 1, Black Girl Magic happened and they were sworn in:

Who the judges are: Sandra Peake, Judge Ramona Franklin, Germaine Tanner, Angela Graves-Harrington, Cassandra Hollerman, Tonya Jones, Dedra Davis, LaShawn A. Williams, Latosha Lewis Payne, Linda M. Dunson, Toria J. Finch, Erica Hughes, Lucia G. Bates, Ronnisha Bowman, Michelle Moore, Sharon Burney, Shannon Baldwin and Lori Chambers Gray.

Harris County, Houston's home and the largest county in Texas, which has a 63 percent Black and Latino population, had the largest turn-out at the polls for midterms in the county's history.

There were some voting issues, as also recorded in states like Georgia and Florida, where technology issues resulted in a suit by Texas Civil Rights Project and Texas Organizing Project to keep polls open later, avoiding disenfranchisement.

Additionally, there were outright attempts to suppress the Black vote, including a Harris County poll worker who told a Black voter, "Maybe if I'd worn my blackface makeup today you could comprehend what I'm saying to you."

When the voter said she was going to call the police, the poll worker responded: "If you call the police, they're going to take you to jail and do something to you, because I'm white."

She was subsequently fired, and voters made their voices heard in an election that featured more Black women on Harris County's ballot than any other.

The newly elected judges will make decisions in the county, where 80 percent of the inmates are people of color.

Although judges are not the only ones at fault for racial disparities in sentencing, they can change the status quo. They set the tone in the courtroom and can make sure everyone gets a fair hearing.

"We talked about coming in and being more compassionate," Ms. Latosha Lewis Payne said of her newly elected colleagues.

"Being more understanding of the poor and disadvantaged that come into the judicial system."She added, "I hope that our election will usher in courts that ensure an equal opportunity for justice for all."

Reader Question: What issues do you think these women can tackle as a collective?


Barbers Help Black Men to Improve Heart Health: Study

Over the course of a year, barbers in Los Angeles County promoted health services that greatly benefitted customers.

Barber Eric Mohammad and customer Mark Sims. Photo Credit: Cedars-Sinai's Smidt Heart Institute.

The barbershop is not only a place for a fresh haircut and conversation, but also a place where heart health can become a priority.

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