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NYPD Discovery Hearing Set for Cop Who Killed Eric Garner

Thursday's hearing could result in Daniel Pantaleo being terminated from the force.

Officer Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer who put Eric Garner in a chokehold which killed him, is scheduled for a disciplinary conference on Thursday that could result in the termination of his job.

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Feds Take Years to File Civil Rights Charges Against Cops ​

"They don't care how long it takes because there is no one telling them they need to get it done sooner," said a former DOJ official.

The Washington Post examined over 50 civil rights cases against officers and found that charges were filed, on average, more than three years after the event.

For example, Eric Garner, who had asthma, was killed in 2014 by NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who along with others tackled him to the ground and put him in a chokehold until Garner couldn't breathe. When the officer wasn't indicted, a civil rights case was opened. There are still no charges filed, four years later.

In 2016, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review studied over 13,000 misconduct cases submitted to the Justice Department over 20 years, and found that 96 percent of cases had no charges filed.

African Americans are only about 13 percent of the population, but make up over 30 percent of people fatally shot by police.

The list of people include Walter Scott, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, Tamir Rice and more.

Brittany Packett, activist and former appointed member of the Ferguson Commission and President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing has said, historically, less than one percent of the officers who shoot Black people are ever convicted of that crime.

Walter Scott, driving with a broken tail light, was shot while running away from North Charleston police officer, Michael Slager. Two years later, the officer plead guilty to violation of civil rights by acting under the color of law.

Alton Sterling was killed by Baton Rouge officers who had pinned him down and shot him in July 2016. In May 2017, federal prosecutors said they wouldn't file civil rights charges against the officers. In March 2018, Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry announced no charges would be filed either.

"The bottom line is there's no pressure," said Roy L. Austin Jr., formerly a top official in the Civil Rights Division at the Justice Department (and attorney for the family of Bijan Ghaisar, who was shot and killed by park police last November).

"They don't care how long it takes because there is no one telling them they need to get it done sooner. So they aren't concerned about the impact it may have on the community or the impact it may have on the family. That's just their way, because they are answerable to no one except their immediate bosses."

Federal investigator agencies don't have confrontations at community meetings, politicians holding them accountable with real consequences, or overwhelming angry emails.

The DOJ's statement: "It is important to understand that 'color of law' cases in particular have an extremely high burden of proof and it takes time to put together an airtight prosecution. Every single color of law case is unique and length depends on a plethora of factors, including: available evidence, the number of witnesses and subjects, local procedures, and grand jury availability."

A cumbersome process noted by approvals of witnesses and scheduling is part of the issue, but there's also an avoidance of controversy.

"There's first of all the general reluctance on the part of prosecutors to go after people in law enforcement because they consider themselves all working on the same team," said Tim Lynch, director of the Project on Criminal Justice at Cato Institute, a think-tank in Washington that advocates for smaller government.

Ronald T. Hosko, a former FBI agent and president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, which helps officers who need financial or legal assistance in such cases said of the DOJ, "They take their time. There's no rush, and I think some of that is tactical. They're trying to be thorough. But as time goes by, some of the heat is taken out of the community and then they give you the result nine months later."

NYPD Tells Justice Department to Move Forward with Eric Garner Case, Family Calls BS

"We don't want politics to play a part, we just want justice," said Gwen Carr, Garner's mother.

REUTERS

The New York Police Department told the Department of Justice it has until the end of August to move forward with taking action in the death of Eric Garner, or else it will take matters into its own hands. Meanwhile, on the fourth anniversary of his death, Garner's family asks why they can't just take action now.

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No Middle Ground for Human Rights at DiversityInc

Trump's statements yesterday drew a line that divides good from evil. There is no moral equivalence. You have a right to know where leadership stands.

REUTERS

I saw the president's press conference live yesterday because I had a premonition that he was going to snap back from what he was apparently forced to read from a teleprompter on Monday.

And he did, to a degree that I didn't anticipate. President Trump said it plain and clear: The neo-Nazis are ethically equal to the people protesting neo-Nazis.

My publication has a response: No. They are not equal.

On one side there is a group that espouses that white people are superior and all others are inferior. This side fetishizes Hitler and the Nazi regime killing millions of non-"Aryans," Jews, people with congenital disabilities and gay people. On the other side there are people opposed to killing people and who believe that people are equal.

On one side there is a group who honors the Confederacy, a rebellion that existed simply and solely to maintain slavery. On the other side are people who believe in human rights and that the enslavement of Black people was wrong.

On one side there is a group that cloaks its hate in words like "honoring our heritage." On the other side are people who know that 55 percent of Black Americans live in the South and that their heritage matters, that Black Lives Matter.

You are on one side or the other. Period. There is no middle ground.

People who draw an equivalence between the violence of Nazis and the violence of people protesting Nazis — or talk of "state rights" — are Nazis themselves. In poker, that's called a "tell." There's no such thing as being "sympathetic" to evil without being evil.

Now we know without a doubt that Trump's claiming that Barack Obama was not born in the United States — and all of the other vile things he's said about Mexicans, Muslims, women, Black Americans, people with disabilities, POWs and others — are a pattern that describes exactly how he feels. He is not qualified to be president, and the entire Republican Party needs to take responsibility for this disaster and DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.

You have the right to ask the people who sought and attained positions of power and authority where they stand, from your town council person to your CEO. Do it anonymously if you feel threatened, but make your voice heard. Let's make America great.

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Justice Department Replaces Team Investigating Eric Garner Death

Federal charges could still be a long time away in the Garner case.

Left: Attorney General Loretta Lynch (REUTERS); Right: 2014 arrest of Eric Garner.

In an unusual move, Attorney General Loretta Lynch has taken New York-based lawyers and investigators off the team tasked to Eric Garner's case, meaning the federal criminal investigation into Eric Garner's death may finally be moving forward — two years after his death.

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Trayvon Martin's Mother Endorses Clinton: 'Vote … Your life depends on it'

Martin's mother, along with other Mothers of the Movement, said it is absolutely vital to vote on Election Day.

Five Mothers of the Movement endorsed Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton this weekend, with Trayvon Martin's mother encouraging citizens to vote for her because "Your life depends on it."

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Terence Crutcher: Unarmed Black Man with Hands Up Shot by Police

Video shows Crutcher had his hands up moments before he was shot by a Tulsa, Oklahoma, police officer. He did not survive.

UPDATE: 5:15 p.m. ET Sept. 22, 2016

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Mothers of Black Victims of Violence Lead Movement for Change

The deaths of their children sparked a national debate about police reform and race relations, and they say the conversation must continue for change to occur.

When Trayvon Martin was killed four years ago, his mother became part of a cause she had no intention of joining: a movement to bring attention to the senseless deaths of Black Americans in suspiciously racial circumstances.

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Alton Sterling Killing Witness Bullied by Police; Video Poster Also Intimidated

Harassment, unlawful detention, paperwork flimflammery, humiliation alleged in retaliation against video witnesses to Alton's senseless death.

The convenience store owner in Baton Rouge who witnessed and filmed the killing of Alton Sterling at the hands of police last week has sued the police department and five officers alleging they acted improperly and violated his rights.

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Police Shoot Black Man Point Blank While Restrained on Ground

Protests erupt in Baton Rouge following release of cellphone video; Alton Sterling's family, NAACP call for police chief to resign.

UPDATE: 1 p.m. ET July 6, 2016

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NYPD Finally Finds Someone to Hold Accountable for Eric Garner's Murder — A Black Woman

Sgt. Kizzy Adonis is the first person to be charged with any kind of misconduct in Garner's death.

NYPD Sergeant Kizzy Adonis has received internal disciplinary charges for her involvement with Eric Garner's death. Adonis, who is Black, is the first person to face charges in the case. She faces four counts of "failure to supervise" charges.

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Double Standard: Treatment of Blacks vs. Whites by Police

Nearly half of all people killed by police in 2015 were minorities, and more than a quarter of the victims were Black — despite Blacks only making up 13.2 percent of the nation's population.

Left: Dylann Roof's arrest; right: Eric Garner's arrest

Data released from The Guardian estimates that 1,136 people were killed by police in the U.S. in 2015. According to the statistics (which are difficult to collect because it is not currently required for police stations to report it), 50.9 percent of these people were white. The remaining fatalities were either minorities or unknown. Specifically, the victims were 26.9 percent of the victims were Black, 16.8 percent Hispanic, 2.4 percent unknown, 2 percent Asian and 1 percent Native American.

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