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Non-Whites Make Up Half of Post-Millennial Generation: Study

Latinx post-Millennials represent the future of American voters. Democrats need to pay attention for 2020 and beyond.

REUTERS

A new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data finds that the "post-Millennial" generation, which are those born after 1996, "is already the most racially and ethnically diverse generation, as a bare majority of 6-to 21-year-olds (52%) are non-Hispanic whites."

The only population of youth that has grown substantially since the age of the Baby Boomers in 1968 is Latinx. They were born in the U.S. and go to college before entering the workforce.

In the 2018 midterm elections, millions more Latinx voted than in 2014.

According to Pew, "Latinos made up an estimated 11 percent of all voters nationwide on Election Day, nearly matching their share of the U.S. eligible voter population."

Exit polls for the midterms this year said 67% of youth overall voted for a House Democratic candidate and just 32% for a House Republican candidate, according to The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

Thirty-eight women of color — Black, Latinx, Native American — won seats of real power—including the youngest Congresswoman, Alexandria Oscario-Cortez, 29, a Latina.

However, Democrats lost Texas and Florida because they didn't pay attention to voter decline among Latinx (36.5 percent) across the country.

Pews' analysis on changing demographics correlates with author Steve Phillips' discussion in "Brown Is the New White," which explains that people of color and white progressive voters are America's new majority.

Democratic candidates of color and women (Stacey Abrams, Andrew Gillum, Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama) have outperformed previous candidates in statewide elections in Florida and Georgia over the last 20 years, Phillips wrote in a recent New York Times column. Abrams garnered more votes than any other Democrat in Georgia's history.

Phillips says Obama's playbook is what wins: mobilization over persuasion, along with inspiring people of all races to vote, and being strong in their positions on racism, Medicaid expansion, criminal justice reform and gun control.

"Yes, the strategy of mobilizing voters of color and progressive whites is limited by the demographic composition of particular states. But what Mr. Obama showed twice is that it works in enough places to win the White House. And that is exactly the next electoral challenge."

Phillips said, "These campaigns laid the groundwork for future Democratic success, because the thousands of volunteers, operatives and new voters will pay dividends for the 2020 Democratic nominee."

Reader Question: Do you think the 2020 candidates will tailor their approach to meet the demands of a diverse generation?

On Twitter, President Trump threatened to engage the military to guard the southern border of the Unites States.

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Democrats in Midterm Jeopardy Over Poor Outreach to Latinos

Failure to directly address concerns leads to weak support. Races in Nevada, Arizona, Texas and Florida, states with growing Hispanic populations, are bungled.

REUTERS

Democrats are struggling to secure the Latino vote in the midterm elections because the party did not engage Latino voters strongly enough.

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Indicted Republican Representative is a Bigot, Too

Trump lover Duncan Hunter smears opponent over his name — and gets nothing right.

REUTERS

California Republican Representative Duncan Hunter, who is facing a 48-page federal indictment for campaign fraud, is so afraid of losing his cushy seat in the House of Representatives to Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar that he is resorting to conspiracy theories.

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Kavanaugh Nomination Vote Set for Friday Afternoon, Democrats Walk Out

Republicans place Kavanaugh on the road to confirmation.

REUTERS

UPDATE: 2:15 p.m. ET

Sen. Flake Calls for Delay of Kavanaugh Senate Floor Vote

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who has a deciding vote, said he would not support final confirmation until the F.B.I. investigates accusations of sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh.

"I have been speaking with a number of people on the other side," Flake said to the Senate Judiciary Committee. "We've had conversations ongoing for a while with regard to making sure that we do due diligence here. I think it would be proper to delay the floor vote for up to, but not more than, one week, in order for the FBI to do an investigation limited in time and scope to the current allegations that are there. And limited in time to no more than one week.

"I will vote to advance the bill to the floor with that understanding."

The committee voted to send the Kavanaugh nomination to the floor, 11-10.

But, it's unclear if Republican leaders — or President Trump — will support Flake's call for the investigation.

UPDATE: 1:47 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh scheduled for 1:30 p.m. ET has not yet occurred.

According to CNN, discussions are taking place outside of the hearing room about a potential FBI investigation into Ford's claims, and no more than a week delay for the nomination vote.

ORIGINAL STORY

Despite the explosive testimony of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford against President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Thursday, and the fact there hasn't been an FBI investigation into her claims of sexual assault, Republicans are steps closer to getting him confirmed.

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Kevin Jackson, a Black Fox News contributor, was fired for his Twitter comments during the hearings about the women who accused Kavanaugh of assault and misconduct.

"#ChristineBlaseyFord academic problems came from her PROMISCUITY!" he wrote on Twitter during the Senate appearance. "Dang girl stop opening your legs and OPEN A BOOK!"

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MeToo: Second Kavanaugh Accuser Comes Forward

Democratic Senators call for investigations and increased concern over Kavanaugh being fit to serve; Republicans sat on the story for days and pressured Ford.

Brett Kavanaugh / REUTERS

Deborah Ramirez has come forward detailing an instance of alleged sexual misconduct by Brett Kavanaugh, which dates to the 1983-84 academic year, when Kavanaugh was a freshman at Yale University.

Ramirez is now the second woman to publicly accuse President Trump's Supreme Court justice nominee of sexual misconduct. The first public allegation was made by Christine Blasey Ford.

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Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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Progressive Black Woman Defeats Middle of the Road Incumbent White Male Democrat

Ayanna Pressley is likely to become the first Black woman to be elected to Congress in Massachusetts' history.

Ayanna Pressley / REUTERS

In a wave of unprecedented primary wins by diverse, younger and progressive candidates, before the Nov. 6 election, a Black woman is set to make history as the first to be elected to U.S. Congress in Massachusetts.

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Obama Announces First Round of 2018 Midterm Endorsements, More Than Half Are Women

One of the candidates who earned the former president's support is Stacey Abrams, a Black woman running for governor of Georgia.

REUTERS

Former President Barack Obama announced on Wednesday that he is endorsing 81 Democrats for the upcoming midterm elections and 48 of the candidates are women. Among those listed include Stacey Abrams. If elected, Abrams would make history as the first Black woman to become governor of Georgia.

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Trump Threatens To 'Shutdown Government' If He Doesn't Get His Racist-Baiting Wall

If the Mexican government isn't going to pay for it, as he promised, shouldn't he go south to shut down their government?

President Trump has alluded to doing whatever it takes to get Democrats to jump on board with his plan for immigration reform.

Trump made the campaign promise to his anti-immigrant base: "I'll have Mexico pay for that wall."

But now that it's apparent that was an empty promise and midterm elections are right around the corner, he's threatening to infringe upon the lives of U.S. residents by closing the government.

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Citing Trump, Some Republican Women to Vote Democratic in Ohio Election

In interviews with a dozen women, mostly Republicans, in the Midwestern state's 12th Congressional District, several said they would buck their voting habits to support the Democratic candidate on Aug. 7.

Democratic candidate Danny O'Connor meets with campaign volunteers ahead of a special election in Ohio's 12th congressional district in Dublin, Ohio, U.S., July 15, 2018. / REUTERS

(Reuters) — Becky von Zastrow often votes Republican in her affluent central Ohio suburb — but her dissatisfaction with U.S. President Donald Trump has convinced her to back the Democrat in a special-election test for both parties next month.

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