Sony Pictures Data Theft Reveals Zero Diversity in Top Ranks

By Chris Hoenig


It’s a well-known fact: Hollywood is just as bad as the tech industry when it comes to diversity. And now, thanks to some tech troubles, there’s more proof of just how bad it is.

For more than a week, Sony Pictures has been the victim of a cyber attack. Hackers have released movies that are still in the production phase, taken over Twitter accounts and downloaded terabytes worth of documents. Among those documents: supposed salary guides that give a look into Sony’s upper echelon which is almost all white men.

Things have been changing on-screen and more diversity is appearing amongst the stars, though cartoons have always been ahead of the game. Studies have shown the benefits of a diverse cast and the awards giants in Hollywood have recognized it.

But at Sony, the diversity amongst those earning the big paychecks still lags way behind.

According to one supposedly hacked spreadsheet, there are 17 U.S.-based employees earning at least $1 million a year. Of those, 1694 percentare men and 1588 percentare white.

The lone woman, Sony Pictures Entertainment Co-Chair and Motion Picture Group Chairwoman Amy B. Pascal, earns $3 million a year, equal to that of Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton.

The lone Black man in the group is Dwight Caines, President of Sony Pictures Entertainment’s theatrical arm. He earns $1.05 million annually.

Man Jit Singh, hired in 2007 and currently the President of Sony Pictures Home Entertainment Worldwide, is Asian Indian. He earns $1.8 million.

The lack of diversity amongst these high-earners raises questions about Sony’s overall leadership ranks and how similar it is to some of the mostly white male tech giants. Twitter and Google, for instance, have leadership that is 72 percent white and 21 percent women at each company. Yahoo!’s leadership is 78 percent white and 23 percent women.

By comparison, management at the 2014 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies averages 42 percent women and 24 percent Black, Latino and Asian. Senior management at the Top 50 Companies averages 29 percent women and 15 percent Black, Latino and Asian.

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