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Jesse Jackson Calls Racist Serena Williams Cartoon 'Despicable'

The Herald Sun editor Damon Johnston stands by the cartoon, meanwhile the National Association of Black Journalists slams it.

Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka / YOUTUBE

UPDATE: Sept. 11, 2018 at 6:12 a.m. ET

In response to massive criticism from across the globe regarding the cartoon, Herald Sun editor Damon Johnston is backing editorial cartoonist Mark Knight.

Johnston said in a statement on Tuesday: "A champion tennis player had a mega tantrum on the world stage, and Mark's cartoon depicted that. It had nothing to do with gender or race."

But the U.S.-based National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) disagrees with the Herald Sun, and calls the cartoon "Sambo-like."

"The Sept. 10 cartoon not only exudes racist, sexist caricatures of both women, but Williams' depiction is unnecessarily Sambo-like." NABJ said in a statement. "The art of editorial cartooning is a visual dialogue on the issues of the day, yet this cartoon grossly and inaccurately depicts two women of color at the US Open, one of the grandest stages of professional sports."

ORIGINAL STORY

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. is firing back at a newspaper cartoonist for a racist depiction of Serena Williams, which perpetuates stereotypes about Black women.


At the US Open women's single final on Saturday, Williams confronted umpire Carlos Ramos over allegations that she had received coaching during the match.

The confrontation resulted in Williams being penalized a point and even a game. She was ultimately defeated by Naomi Osaka.

Editorial cartoonist Mark Knight of the Herald Sun, an Australian newspaper, created an illustration mocking Williams. How her facial features are drawn, including large, exaggerated lips and nose, mimics past racist portrayals of Black women during the Jim Crow era.

She is jumping up and down on her racket, while her opponent asks the chair umpire: "Can you just let her win?" Osaka, who is of Haitian and Japanese descent, is depicted as a skinny blonde woman.

Rev. Jackson, who continually defends Black athletes in the midst of criticism for taking a knee against police brutality, took to Twitter to slam Knight's cartoon.

He tweeted Monday afternoon:

Twitter users also showed Knight why his cartoon about Williams is racist:

Amid criticism on social media, Knight has tried to defend his cartoon.

"Don't bring gender into it when it's all about behavior," he tweeted along with a cartoon he recently drew of Nick Krygois, an Australian male tennis player.

But Twitter users argue that the illustration shows the sexism — a male official speaks with Krygois about his sulking, while a woman official pulls him by the ear.

Knight and The Herald Sun continue to defend the Williams cartoon.

The Conversation (1)

School Superintendent on Texans' Deshaun Watson: 'You Can't Count on a Black Quarterback'

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Onalaska School Superintendent, Lynn Redden, could be in hot water after making racist statements about a Black NFL player on Facebook.

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Eddie S. Glaude Jr. questioned Chris McDaniel on how he would appeal to Blacks, and he gave a racist answer.

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Dallas Police Department Attempts to Demonize Murder Victim Botham Jean

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Tennis Umpires Reportedly Discuss Boycotting Serena Williams' Matches

Williams standing up to sexism is creating a fear of culture change.

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As a Black woman, and tennis superstar, Serena Williams has experienced racism and sexism in her profession, repeatedly. And now, umpires may collectively come against her for calling out sexism and boycott her matches.

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UPDATE: Arrest Warrant Finally Issued for White Man Who Threatened FAMU Students

The viral video should have been all the evidence needed.

UPDATE: Sept. 17, 2018

Almost a week after a white man pulled a gun on Black college students, which was clearly detailed in a viral video, a warrant has been issued for his arrest.

"After reviewing all of the evidence and consulting with the State Attorney's Office, a warrant was obtained for Donald Crandall, Jr.," the Tallahassee Police Department said in a statement.

The warrant, issued on Friday, is for violation of a state law against improper exhibition of a firearm.

As of Monday, Crandall was still not in custody.

On Sept. 8, the 49-year-old attempted to prevent the four Florida A&M University (FAMU) students from entering an elevator in the Stadium Centre apartment complex. The complex's management said Crandall is not a resident of the building.

"Once we found out he had the gun, it turned into a whole different situation," FAMU student Isaiah Butterfield told ABC News. "We really think he was trying to provoke us to the point where it got violent so he could retaliate with the gun.

"I knew that if this dude even feels threatened, he's going to find any excuse to pull the trigger."

ORIGINAL STORY

A video posted on Twitter, which has gone viral with more than 300,000 views, shows an encounter between four Black college students, and a white man who pulls his gun on them when they were just trying to visit a friend's apartment.

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Spread the Word on Injustice: You Made #WhileBlack Viral

There are infinite stories out there, and it's time to hear from you, because we know #WhileBlack is happening to you.

Hundreds, even thousands of #WhileBlack stories have swept the nation. You made yet another truth viral with over 90,000 views: Black Restaurant Owner Arrested for Helping Unconscious White Woman Sues NYPD.

Recently, Clyde Pemberton, a businessman in #HarlemWhileBlack, decided, along with his employees to make #WhileBlack legal, literally, and hold the NYPD accountable for arresting them for helping a white woman.

The Harlem MIST owner's lawsuit blatantly states that he was a "conscientious business owner while Black", and his employees were arrested for "being helpful employees while Black."

They want justice for living their lives, trying to help people, and being punished and forever changed because of it. Investors are gone, business is suffering, and he and employees want nothing to do with the police now.

While many stories have been about police and emergency response personnel being annoyed about having to respond to calls about Blacks living their lives, like The Science Behind Why White People Call Police on Black People for Doing Ordinary Things, many also involve the men and women in blue, who act unprofessionally and downright racist in their #WhileBlack perpetuation.

We've covered it in corporate settings, everyday settings, police interactions; we've talked to experts about the phenomenon. #WhileBlack and the fear of a racial group losing its majority status have impacted the country's behavior:

"For people of color, our concern is that we're on guard for discrimination coming toward us. And for whites, the concern is 'Whatever I'm about to say it may be landing in a way where the person perceives me as racist.' So they double down because they don't want to admit a particular bias or slant," said Alexis McGill-Johnson, executive director and co-founder of Perception Institute.

There are infinite stories out there, and it's time to hear from you, because we know #WhileBlack is happening to you.

Join The Conversation below, or send us an email, tweet, Instagram, Facebook or LinkedIn reply and tell us: What is YOUR #WhileBlack story?