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Videos: 2013 Healthcare Event Presentations

FREE previews of all presentations from DiversityInc's September 2013 event, "Culturally Competent Healthcare: How Diversity Creates Better Patient Outcomes."

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On Sept. 24, 2013, healthcare industry leaders gathered at DiversityInc's special event, "Culturally Competent Healthcare: How Diversity Creates Better Patient Outcomes," to discuss health disparities, supplier diversity, clinical trials, Black and Latino physician shortages, and other issues facing patient care today.


Click on any of the presentations below for a FREE preview. The full videos with the presentation slides are available on DiversityInc's member-only website, DiversityInc Best Practices. To find out if your company is a member, visit BestPractices.DiversityInc.com/corporate-subscribers.

Culturally Competent Patient Care—Race/Ethnicity

Dr. Jennifer Mieres: Senior Vice President, Office of Community & Public Health and Chief Diversity Officer - North Shore-LIJ Health System

Dr. Richard Amiraian: Corporate Vice President for Primary Care - Continuum Health Partners

Dr. Naa-Abia Casely-Hayford: Associate Medical Director, Ambulatory Care Services, Medical Director, Employee Health Services - St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center

Learn how to best understand patient values and beliefs, attract and retain representative staffs, and mobilize outreach for sustainable wellness programs.

Culturally Competent Patient Care—Religion

Mark Fowler: Managing Director of Programs - Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding

Judith Natale Sabino: Diversity/Cultural Liaison - Lehigh Valley Health Network

More than 40 percent of patients make medical decisions based on religious beliefs but only 9 percent of physicians ask patients about their religious needs. How can hospitals eliminate this gap?

 

 

HCAHPS—Why an Engaged Workforce Yields Maximum Reimbursement Dollars

Misty Hathaway: Director of Marketing and Administrator for the Office of International Alliances - Mayo Clinic

Learn how hospitals are using D&I to increase and measure employee engagement to ensure better HCAHPS results.

 

 

 

Driving Clinical Excellence Through Diversity and Inclusion

Dr. Ronald Copeland: Senior Vice President, National Diversity Strategy & Policy and Chief Diversity Officer - Kaiser Permanente

How diversity and inclusion has helped Kaiser Permanente improve the quality of care that the organization delivers to patients.

 

 

 

Diversity in Clinical Trials—Improving Research Outcomes, Targeted Drug Development

Dr. Coleman Obasaju: Senior Medical Director, Lilly Oncology and Global Leader, Diversity in Clinical Research - Eli Lilly and Company.

Learn how pharmaceutical leaders are partnering with not-for-profits to elicit specific information that will improve outcomes for Black, Latino and Asian populations for diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

 

 

Reducing the Black and Latino Physician Shortage

Dr. Maia McCuiston Jackson: Physician Director of Multicultural Services - Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group

What can hospitals do to create a pipeline of physicians from these groups and to effectively recruit and retain them?

 

 

 

Quantifying Health Disparities and Linking Multicultural Marketing to Sales

Steve Millerman: CEO - Prime Access

Tracking multicultural marketing investments and measuring ROI is no longer an impossibility.

 

 

 

Panel: Resource Groups—Building Engagement and Culturally Competent Care

Nancy Di Dia: Executive Director, Diversity, Inclusion & Engagement - Boehringer Ingelheim

Le Joyce Naylor: Executive Director, Diversity & Inclusion - Cleveland Clinic

Tracy Edmonds: Director, HR & Diversity - WellPoint

How resource groups improve outcomes by providing services such as translations, cultural intelligence and connections to community organizations; providing opportunities for recruitment, retention and development of employees; and helping build stronger partnerships with communities.

 

Improving Patient Medication Adherence—The Role of the Retail Pharmacy and Retail Clinics

Anita M. Allemand: Vice President, Product Innovation and Management - CVS Caremark

Learn how cultural competence among pharmacists can impact patient adherence to medication and treatment.

 

 

 

How Hospitals Develop Supplier-Diversity Initiatives

Dr. Glenn Croxton: Director, Vendor Compliance and Management - Henry Ford Health System

How are hospitals growing supplier-diversity efforts to mirror the increasing diversity of their patient base and using these efforts to strengthen community ties?

 

 

Eliminating Health Disparities

Dr. Joseph Betancourt: Director, The Disparities Solutions Center – Massachusetts General Hospital

What strategies are hospitals, health insurers and pharmas implementing to encourage effective cross-cultural care that will reduce disparities? What types of educational tools are most effective?

 

 

In interviews with DiversityInc, event speakers and participants discussed the importance of culturally competent healthcare and initiatives that their companies are taking on to reduce health disparities and improve patient care.

Dr. Ronald Copeland, Kaiser Permanente

Dr. Gary Butts, Mount Sinai Ichan School of Medicine

Dr. Jeanne Varrone, Boehringer Ingelheim

Update: Black Security Guard Gunned Down by Police Was Wearing a 'SECURITY' Hat

Not only was he clearly identifiable, but officers on the scene knew Jemel Roberson. A civil rights lawsuit has been filed against "Officer John Doe" and Midloathian Village.

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Jemel Roberson, age 26, shot and killed on Sunday by a white cop in a Chicago suburb, was wearing a hat that said "SECURITY" on it, clearly identifying himself as an ally to the police.

Officers circled his body in video footage, after telling the unnamed officer, who is a four-year veteran of the force, that Roberson was "one of us."

The medical examiner in Cook County ruled Roberson's death a homicide by multiple gunshot wounds.

Beatrice Roberson, Jemel's mother, retained attorney Gregory Kulis who filed a civil rights lawsuit against "Officer John Doe" and the Village of Midloathian on Monday claiming the officer's actions were "intentional, willful and wanton" and that the shooting was "unprovoked," "unjustified" and "unreasonable."

"Jemel was trying to save people's lives," said Kulis. "He was working security. A shooting had just taken place inside the establishment. So he was doing his job and holding onto somebody until somebody arrived. And a police officer, it's our feeling didn't make the proper assessment and fired and killed Jemel."

Midloathian police expressed "heartfelt condolences" in a statement to the family.

Sherriff's office spokeswoman Sophia Ansari said the man shot by police, "turned out to be a guy working security for the bar."

Roberson was the father of a nine-month-old son with Avontea Boose, and was planning on getting an apartment for his family with his earnings from the job, according to Rev. Marvin Hunter, who also said Roberson was a promising keyboard player at several churches including his, and "an upstanding man."

Hunter is the great uncle of Laquan McDonald who was also killed by police in Chicago in 2014.

A vigil held outside Manny's on Monday was wrought with expressions of frustration, grief, and demands for action:

"Why? Why did you kill him?" Roberson's cousin, Candace Ousley asked. "It doesn't make sense. The police officer just saw a black man. I believe if he was indeed white, he'd be alive."

Another man at the vigil said, "This was not reckless policing, this was homicidal policing. They saw a black man with a gun. If he did not have a gun, his black skin made him a weapon.

"As a community, we demand respectful engagement. We want the police to treat our people with just a certain amount of dignity and respect. They patrol the Black community like some . . . Gestapo being judge, jury and executioner."

Another vigil attendee, Harvey Alderman Keith Price, called on State's Attorney Kim Foxx to open an investigation into the shooting.

"This could have been my son. This could have been any one of our sons," Price said. "So Kim Foxx, do the right thing, open up a full out investigation. That's what you got elected for."

Lane Tech College Prep, where Roberson graduated from, tweeted a remembrance of Roberson:

Related Story: Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Jemel Roberson Remembered By Friends www.youtube.com

Trump Shares Latest Racist and Xenophobic Midterm Ad

"This is distracting, divisive Donald at his worst," said Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez.

President Trump tweeted a video on Wednesday with the following commentary: "It is outrageous what the Democrats are doing to our country. Vote Republican now! http://Vote.GOP."

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Black Women Have Higher Rates of Life-Threatening Birth Complications

New study shows women of color have a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, even when they suffer the same health ailments as white women.

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The University of Michigan released a study that shows women of color have higher rates of major birth problems. Many required emergency treatment such as blood transfusions — a staggering three-quarters of cases —for women suffering a serious hemorrhage.

The study of 40,873 women between 2012-2015 revealed Black women had 70 percent higher rate of severe birth-related health issues than white women, and that a disparity existed in terms of needing life-saving treatment—50.5 Black mothers vs. 40.9 white mothers per 10,000.

Black women are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes as their white counterparts, according to the C.D.C.

"Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related emergency stories publicly have drawn the national spotlight to the urgent need to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in care for women around the time of delivery. To drive and target those changes, we need specific data like these," said Lindsay Admon, M.D., M.Sc., the study's lead author.

Williams, who has a history of blood clots, began feeling short of breath in the hospital the day after her daughter Alexis Olympia was born. A nurse said her pain medication was likely confusing her, but Williams was persistent and it saved her life.

"Situations like these are often considered near misses, and looking at them allows us to get a better picture of who the high-risk women really are," said Admon, an obstetrician at Michigan Medicine's Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital, and a member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

Maternal Morbidity: Study reveals disparities by race and ethnicity.

All women who had chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, hypertension, depression or substance use issues before giving birth had a higher risk for the continuation of those problems post-child birth, but women of color with two or more conditions were two to three times more likely to have major birth problems than white women.

White women had higher rates of depression and substance use issues than any other group, but the risk for birth problems was lower than women of color with the same health issues.

While Medicaid pays for almost two-thirds of all births among women of color, access to care is another issue that affects births and post birth health. Medicaid pays for more than a third of births of white and Asian women.

Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Blacks and Latinos were more likely than whites to face barriers in access to health care.

Between 2013 and 2015, disparities with whites narrowed for Blacks and Latinos in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, including the percentage of uninsured working-age adults, the percentage who skipped care because of costs, and the percentage who lacked a regular care provider.

Medicaid pays for most procedures for women of color.

Latino Man Called Racial Slurs at Chicago Cubs Game: Video

Racial slurs hurled in bleachers on Hispanic Heritage Night resulted in a brawl.

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The Chicago Cubs might have broken their long drought of world series titles but they have not changed their racist fan base.

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Inspiring Words of Wisdom for Latina Women and Immigrants

"Take advantage of the excellent resources and tools available to you," says Corporate Finance Manager, Elsa Carballo

Produced by: Alana Winns
Videography by: Christian Carew

Update: Officer's Story of S​hooting Botham Jean Contradicts Witnesses

Witnesses say they heard the officer say, "Let me in. Let me in."

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Botham "Bo" Jean was killed around 10 p.m. on Thursday night by Amber Guyger, a four-year veteran of the Dallas police department, who just ended her shift and returned to her apartment complex.

The 911 call said she cried after shooting Jean in the chest, and apologized saying she thought it was her apartment. Her arrest warrant says that Guyger reports drawing her gun when she saw a figure in the dark apartment, giving verbal commands—which were ignored—and then firing two shots.

But witnesses, according to the family lawyers, say that they heard sounds and talking that contradict that report.

"They heard knocking down the hallway followed by a woman's voice that they believe to be officer Guyger saying, 'Let me in. Let me in,'" attorney Lee Merritt said.

After the gunshots, a man's voice was heard.

"What we believe to be the last words of Botham Jean which was 'Oh my god, why did you do that?'" Merritt said.

There were two witnesses, Caitlyn Simpson and Yasmine Hernandez, that heard a lot of noise on the fourth floor that night, including 'police talk', like: "Open up!"

There was also a video taken by witnesses of Jean being rolled out on a stretcher, with EMS performing chest compressions on him.

Dallas County District Attorney Faith Johnson is collecting all of the evidence before presenting to a grand jury, which could decide to up the charges to murder.

"We're going to unravel what we need to unravel, unturn what we need to unturn, and present a full case to the grand jury of Dallas County," Johnson said.

Protests were held Monday night outside the police department as questions still remain:

What were the results of the blood test for Guyger, and why did police respond from 30 miles away, rather than Dallas police headquarters that was two blocks away?

The family's lawyers are also still asking why Guyger was allowed to leave the scene without handcuffs and not be arrested for three days. "You or I would be arrested if we went to the wrong apartment and blow a hole in a person's chest, killing them," said Benjamin Crump.

The officer was arrested Sunday, and released on $300,000 bail as of Monday. She is on paid administrative leave.

Botham Jean's funeral is on Thursday.

Related Story: Dallas Police Department's Attempt to Demonize Murder Victim, Botham Jean, is Disgusting

Related Story: Update: Botham Jean Celebrated Amid the Urging of Officer Guyger to Come Clean

Related story: White Police Officer Charged With Manslaughter for Shooting Black Man in His Own Apartment

"Let me in": Witnesses dispute cop account of Botham Jean shooting, attorney says

White Police Officer Charged With Manslaughter for Shooting Black Man in His Own Apartment

Dallas family protested the officer being free and on leave for three days after the killing.

SCREENSHOT FROM "CBS THIS MORNING" BROADCAST

Dallas police officer Amber Guyger, who is white, fatally shot a 26-year-old Black man, Botham Jean, in his own apartment on Thursday, claiming she entered what she thought was her own home.

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Latino Employees Fired in Miami for Being Too Latino

Company leadership says loud, sexy, Hispanic employees with ethnic mannerisms are not allowed.

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Former employees at Swire Properties filed a lawsuit in August against the company claiming they were fired because there was no place for "Hispanic Emotionalism" at work.

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