food

School District Repackages Unused Food to Fight Student Hunger

The Elkhart School District of Indiana just started saving their wasted food and repackaging and freezing it. Instead of simply throwing the uneaten food in the trash like they were doing, they are sending it home with at-risk students so they for sure have something to eat on the weekends.

The school district partnered with Cultivate, a food rescue group. Cultivate collects, repackages and freezes the unused food from daily school lunches.

For the rest of the school year, 20 at-risk students from Woodland Elementary School will get a backpack every Friday that has eight frozen meals for weekends at home.

 “It’s making a big impact,” Melissa Ramey from Chamber Leadership Academy told WSBT. “I am proud of that. It was heartbreaking to hear that children go home on the weekends and that they don’t have anything to eat.”

In the Elkhart School District, many students depend heavily on the free breakfasts and lunches that are provided by the school. Those meals are often their main and only source of food. When the students are at home on the weekends, oftentimes they go without eating until Monday.

According to statistics, Elkhart County is 89.5 percent white, about 6 percent Black and 16 percent Hispanic. The poverty rate among children under 18 is about 15 percent. There are over 18,000 kids in the county that qualify for a free or reduced lunch, so the district still has a long way to go to start helping the other tens of thousands of kids who likely don’t get food or healthy foot on the weekends.

Elkhart County is just a small example of a country-wide problem. More than 13 million children in the United States live in “food insecure” homes. A “food insecure” home means the family frequently doesn’t have enough food to eat. One in six children in the U.S. face hunger.

Latest News

The History of Women’s History Month

We celebrate Women’s History Month each March to honor the legacy, contributions and resilience of women and girls around the world, but a recognized time dedicated to celebrating women wasn’t formally added to the calendar until 1980. What originally became a national, monthlong celebration began as a locally celebrated women’s…

Thasunda Brown Duckett

Thasunda Brown Duckett Named CEO of TIAA; Second Black Woman Recently Named to Lead Fortune 500 Company

TIAA — Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America — has announced that Thasunda Brown Duckett will become the company’s new CEO, succeeding Roger W. Ferguson Jr. who announced in November 2020 his plans to retire. With her appointment, Duckett will join newly named Walgreen’s CEO Rosalind Brewer as one…