Screenshots of ABC 10 MIAMI broadcast

Police Get Prison Time for Framing a Black Teen

Biscayne Park Police Chief Raimundo Atesiano claimed a perfect rate of solving burglaries, by charging his subordinates with stopping people of color at the “badlands”— the border of the predominantly white suburban city.

Officers Charlie Dayoub, Raul Fernandez, and Guillermo Ravelo complied with their chief’s request, and paid the price. FBI investigations uncovered it, and all officers plead guilty. Dayoub and Fernandez thought that by cooperating, they would get leniency.

But U.S. District Judge K. Michael Moore sentenced them to the maximum: one year in prison for the false arrests.


“It would have been a slap on the wrist, and it would have sent entirely the wrong message — particularly to the minority community,” Moore told Assistant U.S. Attorney Harry Wallace. “To think that they can come into court and get a slap on the wrist is insulting to the men and women in law enforcement.”

Fernandez notarized arrest affidavits and Dayoub signed as the arresting officer. Vague language such as “investigation revealed,” same “M.O.” and homes had “rear door pried open.”

Ravelo faces up to 10 years at his sentencing Thursday for violating the civil rights of innocent victims by false arrests. Atesiano faces similar punishment in November.

Related Story: Former Police Chief Pleads Guilty to Framing Innocent Black Men

Fernandez, a 30-year-veteran of the force, reported a “culture of fear and reprisal” created by Atesiano.

His attorney, David Sobel, wrote in a motion to seek 12-month probationary sentence: “Atesiano was so focused on having a 100% clearance rate that he was enlisting his officers to make ‘bad’ arrests and to harass people of color who were seen anywhere within the city.”

“Mr. Fernandez detailed to the FBI and United States Attorney’s Office … how Atesiano, via his underlings, would use a specific code meant to alert officers that a person of color was seen in the city and that they needed to be stopped and confronted,” the defense attorney wrote.

The prosecutor, Wallace said he wanted an opportunity to compel Atesiano to plead guilty to a felony civil rights conspiracy, and said a plea deal would drop that charge for the two officers (which carried a maximum 10 year sentence) in exchange for their testimony against Atesiano.

Moore did not agree and accused the prosecutors of “sentencing manipulation.” He said if they went to trial against the ex-chief and the officers it would have been a “slam dunk.”

Charges against the 16-year-old teen, referring to as T.D. in court documents, were eventually dropped. Charges against the homeless man, Erasmus Banmah, 31, were also dropped. Clarens Desrouleaux, 35, one of the other framed victims who spent five years in prison and was deported to Haiti, filed a federal lawsuit last month against the town and the officers for violating his civil rights.

Latest News

Southern Company Outlines its Commitment to Antiracism in New ‘Be the Change’ Website

Originally published on southerncompany.info/bethechange. Our Values Safety First We believe the safety of our employees and customers is paramount. We will perform and maintain every job, every day, safely. Unquestionable Trust Honesty, respect, fairness and integrity drive our behavior. We keep our promises, and ethical behavior is our standard. Superior…

degeneres, work, show

Leadership Lessons to be Gleaned from Ellen DeGeneres’ Toxic Workplace Scandal

Ellen DeGeneres began her daytime talk show’s 18th season with an apology after a summer of allegations against her that claimed her show promoted a toxic work environment rife with racism, sexual misconduct and other mistreatment. In August 2020, three senior producers — executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Leman…

COVID entrepreneur

Explosive New Growth in Small Businesses Due to COVID-19; America’s Police Force is Not Becoming More Diverse Despite BLM Movement; the Best and Worst Performing States in the 2020 Census; and More

Even with incredible nationwide unemployment rates, the creation of new small and diverse businesses has exploded due to COVID-19. Finally some news coming out of our pandemic: The Philadelphia Tribune reports that as bars and restaurants closed and stay-at-home orders were put into place earlier in 2020 to help fight…

Justice for Breonna not served; The essential rule of politics; Teen serves two months in jail for not doing homework; and More

Justice for Breonna not served as grand jury indicted officer who shot her with wanton endangerment — but not murder. “Outrageous and offensive.” Those were  by attorney to the family, Ben Crump to describe the grand jury’s decision in the March 13 fatal police shooting of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor. While…

IBM, EEOC, age

EEOC Unearths Years of Intentional Age Discrimination within IBM

After a long investigation, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has revealed that IBM leaders had directed managers to replace older workers with younger ones. Between 2013 and 2018, nearly 86% of those considered for layoffs within the organization were older employees over the age of 40. The investigation showed…

Breathe March in Globe Park, New York, USA - 12 Sep 2020

Cities under attack from the Justice Department; Louisville bracing for the Breonna Taylor murder charge; Twitter reveals its racist side; and More

Justice department attacks three U.S. cities, declaring them anarchist zones — despite most of the protests that took place in each city being peaceful marches in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. In a move designed to pull federal funding from New York City, Seattle and Portland, OR, the…