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What Does Segregation Look Like Today?

Breakdown of Census data gives an eye-opening look at how America remains segregated today.

By Chris Hoenig


When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shared his dream with America 50 years ago, undisguised segregation was the norm. In schools and bathrooms, on buses and at water fountains, overt racial division was not just accepted, it was advertised.

Dr. King's goal was simple: absolute equality. "I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together," he professed from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

Fifty years later, the most obvious forms of discrimination are outlawed. But the work of a University of Virginia researcher gives a powerful view of what segregation looks like today. Dustin Cable of UVa's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service used data from the 2010 U.S. Census to create a map showing the racial and ethnic makeup of the country, right down to individual blocks within a city.

Nearly 309 million individual dots make up the map, each representing one American. The dots are color-coded based on race and ethnicity: blue dots represent white Americans, green dots represent Blacks, red is used for Asians, orange for Latinos and brown for "other" racial categories. The results speak for themselves.

Detroit

In perhaps the most striking image example of segregation in the country, a single road–the infamous 8 Mile–separates Blacks and whites in the Motor City. More than 80 percent of the city's nearly 750,000 residents are Black, a major shift from the decades leading up to Dr. King's speech: In 1940, more than 90 percent of Detroit's population was white.

New York City

America's largest city is also one of the most diverse. But while Cable's map is colorful, showcasing the diversity, his work also shows the obvious segregation within the Big Apple. With the exception of Chinatown, most of Manhattan below 125th Street is white, as are large swaths of Brooklyn and Staten Island. Black families are largely in Harlem and Queens. The Bronx is home to a diverse population, except for whites.

Philadelphia

The City of Brotherly Love has a very concentrated population. Center City is largely white, with Black and Latino families living mainly in North Philly and to the west of downtown. Philadelphia's suburbs also find themselves segregated: Willingboro, N.J.  (middle right of image, directly below Burlington), is about 20 miles from Philadelphia. More than 75 percent of the town's population is Black.

Atlanta, Washington, D.C.

Two other cities with large, mostly Black middle-class suburbs are Atlanta (above) and Washington, D.C. (below). But in both cases, white and Black families settle on opposite sides of the city. In Atlanta's case, southern and eastern suburbs are mainly Black, while whites live to the north. Washington's suburbs segregate from east to west, with Black families to the south and east, and white families to the west. Latino families settle largely to the southwest of the city.

Chicago, Boston

Two of America's larger cities are also some of the most segregated. In Chicago (above), the South Side is one of the largest majority-Black regions in any U.S. city. West Garfield Park and other surrounding neighborhoods are also largely Black, separated from the South Side by an area that is mostly Latino. Whites live mostly to the north of the city.

Boston's Black population (below) is also segregated to the south of the city, in the Dorchester area. Latinos live to the northeast of the city, while whites live in the northern and western suburbs.

Cleveland

While the neighborhoods just west of the city are extremely diverse, Cleveland's Black population–which makes up more than half of the city's total population–is otherwise concentrated almost exclusively on the East Side. Almost all of the city's Latino residents live in the diverse western neighborhoods, while whites live outside the city is southern and far western suburbs.

LA, Miami

Though they are among America's most diverse cities, Cable's maps of Los Angeles (above) and Miami (below) paint clear pictures of how people of different races and ethnicities segregate. L.A.'s map looks like a color wheel: South Central Los Angeles is largely Black (green dots), while the southwestern communities are almost exclusively Latino (orange dots). The city's Asian community (red dots) lives to the northeast, and whites (blue dots) live to the east and southeast.

Miami's color map, meanwhile, looks like a fade. The Latino community is concentrated in the south, whites to the north and Blacks living in between.

Cable's interactive map, where all of the above images are from, can be accessed on the Cooper Center's website.

Police Investigate Teen's Threats to Lynch N*****s in Racist Snapchat Video

NAACP says: While the state has hate crime laws, they're not often enforced.

A white teen, social media identified as a student at Southington High School in Connecticut, made a racist video that included threats of lynching Black people and claims that he "hung 12 Black men from a tree just this night."

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Trial Begins for Cops Charged With Covering Up Laquan McDonald's Death

They are the first Chicago officers to face criminal "code of silence" charges.

Screenshot from ABC 7 Chicago

The trial of former Detective David March and former Officers Joseph Walsh and Thomas Gaffney of the Chicago Police Department begins today. The men are charged with conspiracy, obstruction of justice and misconduct in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

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'You Will Be Wiped Out,' Says White Woman to Latina in Phoenix: Video

"I prefer the whole freakin' nation to be white," the woman says.

Screenshot of video; photo of Lennys Bermudez (FACEBOOK)

Lennys Bermudez was at a restaurant in north Phoenix when a white customer assailed her with racist comments, reflective of today's "political climate," Bermudez said.

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Update: Black Security Guard Gunned Down by Police Was Wearing a 'SECURITY' Hat

Not only was he clearly identifiable, but officers on the scene knew Jemel Roberson. A civil rights lawsuit has been filed against "Officer John Doe" and Midloathian Village.

FACEBOOK

Jemel Roberson, age 26, shot and killed on Sunday by a white cop in a Chicago suburb, was wearing a hat that said "SECURITY" on it, clearly identifying himself as an ally to the police.

Officers circled his body in video footage, after telling the unnamed officer, who is a four-year veteran of the force, that Roberson was "one of us."

The medical examiner in Cook County ruled Roberson's death a homicide by multiple gunshot wounds.

Beatrice Roberson, Jemel's mother, retained attorney Gregory Kulis who filed a civil rights lawsuit against "Officer John Doe" and the Village of Midloathian on Monday claiming the officer's actions were "intentional, willful and wanton" and that the shooting was "unprovoked," "unjustified" and "unreasonable."

"Jemel was trying to save people's lives," said Kulis. "He was working security. A shooting had just taken place inside the establishment. So he was doing his job and holding onto somebody until somebody arrived. And a police officer, it's our feeling didn't make the proper assessment and fired and killed Jemel."

Midloathian police expressed "heartfelt condolences" in a statement to the family.

Sherriff's office spokeswoman Sophia Ansari said the man shot by police, "turned out to be a guy working security for the bar."

Roberson was the father of a nine-month-old son with Avontea Boose, and was planning on getting an apartment for his family with his earnings from the job, according to Rev. Marvin Hunter, who also said Roberson was a promising keyboard player at several churches including his, and "an upstanding man."

Hunter is the great uncle of Laquan McDonald who was also killed by police in Chicago in 2014.

A vigil held outside Manny's on Monday was wrought with expressions of frustration, grief, and demands for action:

"Why? Why did you kill him?" Roberson's cousin, Candace Ousley asked. "It doesn't make sense. The police officer just saw a black man. I believe if he was indeed white, he'd be alive."

Another man at the vigil said, "This was not reckless policing, this was homicidal policing. They saw a black man with a gun. If he did not have a gun, his black skin made him a weapon.

"As a community, we demand respectful engagement. We want the police to treat our people with just a certain amount of dignity and respect. They patrol the Black community like some . . . Gestapo being judge, jury and executioner."

Another vigil attendee, Harvey Alderman Keith Price, called on State's Attorney Kim Foxx to open an investigation into the shooting.

"This could have been my son. This could have been any one of our sons," Price said. "So Kim Foxx, do the right thing, open up a full out investigation. That's what you got elected for."

Lane Tech College Prep, where Roberson graduated from, tweeted a remembrance of Roberson:

Related Story: Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Jemel Roberson Remembered By Friends www.youtube.com

Motel 6 to Pay Millions in Settlement for Giving Guest Lists to ICE

Latino guests were the main targets, and individual checks aren't nearly enough for the "inconvenience."

Motel 6 has agreed to pay at least $7.6 million to settle a class-action lawsuit after multiple locations of the hotel chain surrendered guest lists to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents.

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Trump Shares Latest Racist and Xenophobic Midterm Ad

"This is distracting, divisive Donald at his worst," said Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez.

President Trump tweeted a video on Wednesday with the following commentary: "It is outrageous what the Democrats are doing to our country. Vote Republican now! http://Vote.GOP."

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Black Women Have Higher Rates of Life-Threatening Birth Complications

New study shows women of color have a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, even when they suffer the same health ailments as white women.

REUTERS

The University of Michigan released a study that shows women of color have higher rates of major birth problems. Many required emergency treatment such as blood transfusions — a staggering three-quarters of cases —for women suffering a serious hemorrhage.

The study of 40,873 women between 2012-2015 revealed Black women had 70 percent higher rate of severe birth-related health issues than white women, and that a disparity existed in terms of needing life-saving treatment—50.5 Black mothers vs. 40.9 white mothers per 10,000.

Black women are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes as their white counterparts, according to the C.D.C.

"Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related emergency stories publicly have drawn the national spotlight to the urgent need to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in care for women around the time of delivery. To drive and target those changes, we need specific data like these," said Lindsay Admon, M.D., M.Sc., the study's lead author.

Williams, who has a history of blood clots, began feeling short of breath in the hospital the day after her daughter Alexis Olympia was born. A nurse said her pain medication was likely confusing her, but Williams was persistent and it saved her life.

"Situations like these are often considered near misses, and looking at them allows us to get a better picture of who the high-risk women really are," said Admon, an obstetrician at Michigan Medicine's Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital, and a member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

Maternal Morbidity: Study reveals disparities by race and ethnicity.

All women who had chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, hypertension, depression or substance use issues before giving birth had a higher risk for the continuation of those problems post-child birth, but women of color with two or more conditions were two to three times more likely to have major birth problems than white women.

White women had higher rates of depression and substance use issues than any other group, but the risk for birth problems was lower than women of color with the same health issues.

While Medicaid pays for almost two-thirds of all births among women of color, access to care is another issue that affects births and post birth health. Medicaid pays for more than a third of births of white and Asian women.

Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Blacks and Latinos were more likely than whites to face barriers in access to health care.

Between 2013 and 2015, disparities with whites narrowed for Blacks and Latinos in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, including the percentage of uninsured working-age adults, the percentage who skipped care because of costs, and the percentage who lacked a regular care provider.

Medicaid pays for most procedures for women of color.

Democrats in Midterm Jeopardy Over Poor Outreach to Latinos

Failure to directly address concerns leads to weak support. Races in Nevada, Arizona, Texas and Florida, states with growing Hispanic populations, are bungled.

REUTERS

Democrats are struggling to secure the Latino vote in the midterm elections because the party did not engage Latino voters strongly enough.

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