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TIME Magazine Excluding Tarana Burke from #MeToo Cover Speaks Volumes

Burke got it right when she created the movement more than a decade ago, but an almost all white, and mostly male, editorial team didn't see fit to place her on the cover.

TIME magazine, which named the "Silence Breakers" of the #MeToo social movement as most influential in 2017, excluded the Black woman who founded the movement — Tarana Burke — from the cover.


Burke got it right when she created the movement more than a decade ago in 2006, but an editorial team that is almost 100 percent white and mostly male, didn't see fit to place her on the cover of one of its most popular issues published last week.

Even though Burke had been raising awareness about sexual harassment and assault for years, "Me Too" has only caught the attention of major media outlets following the more than 50 leading white Hollywood actresses, including Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie, accusing Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment in October.

"Movie stars are supposedly nothing like you and me," the TIME article begins. "They're svelte, glamorous, self-possessed. They wear dresses we can't afford and live in houses we can only dream of. Yet it turns out that—in the most painful and personal ways—movie stars are more like you and me than we ever knew."

They've made the focus of the movement movie stars.

In October, Milano shared the #MeToo hashtag on Twitter and women began to use it to share accounts of sexual harassment. She later acknowledged in a tweet that Burke created the #MeToo movement.

But, again, Black women are marginalized in the movements in which they started, such as the movement against Donald Trump being elected as president, for example. According to exit polls, more than 90 percent of Black women voted for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, while more than 53 percent of white women voted for Trump.

TIME magazine, recently sold to Meredith Corporation and the deal is linked to the politically active Koch brothers, frames the narrative of the #MeToo movement as if it weren't for Milano sharing the hashtag, what the magazine calls, "one of the highest-velocity shifts in our culture since the 1960s," may not have taken place.

In the cover story, Burke is mentioned in passing:

"This was the great unleashing that turned the #MeToo hashtag into a rallying cry. The phrase was first used more than a decade ago by social activist Tarana Burke as part of her work building solidarity among young survivors of harassment and assault.

"A friend of the actor Alyssa Milano sent her a screenshot of the phrase, and Milano, almost on a whim, tweeted it out on Oct. 15. 'If you've been sexually harassed or assaulted write 'me too' as a reply to this tweet,' she wrote, and then went to sleep. She woke up the next day to find that more than 30,000 people had used #MeToo. Milano burst into tears."

TIME's editor-in-chief Edward Felsenthal wrote a column on why the "silence breakers," women who spoke out about their experiences of sexual harassment and assault, were chosen as "person" of the year.

Felsenthal quoted Milano:

"'I woke up and there were 32,000 replies in 24 hours,' says actor Alyssa Milano, who, after the first Weinstein story broke, helped popularize the phrase coined years before by Tarana Burke. 'And I thought, My God, what just happened? I think it's opening the floodgates.'"

He then made a parallel to civil rights icon Rosa Parks.

"To imagine Rosa Parks with a Twitter account is to wonder how much faster civil rights might have progressed."

Never mind that in 2006, Burke, a three-time sexual violence survivor, created Just Be Inc., a nonprofit organization focused on the health, well being and wholeness of young women of color. Over the years many survivors of abuse have credited her for helping them.

A woman tweeted in October:

Then, a follow-up article, "'Now the Work Really Begins.' Alyssa Milano and Tarana Burke on What's Next for the #MeToo Movement'" highlights an appearance the woman made on the "Today" show, where the two met for the first time.

The article begins:

"Alyssa Milano, who has roused thousands of women to speak out about their experiences of sexual harassment and assault, joined #MeToo movement creator Tarana Burke on Wednesday to call for more change after Time revealed its 2017 Person of the Year: 'The Silence Breakers.'"

TIME did publish an article in October talking about how Burke created the Me Too movement. But for the Person of the Year issue, the focus of Burke's original endeavor is framed by the one tweet from Milano. A Black woman's quest to change society for the better is now better accepted because a white advocate can also be the face of it.

In an interview with The New York Times last week, actress Gabrielle Union, who is a survivor of sexual violence, pointed out that the #MeToo movement that now exists empowers white women as the plight of women of color has not been taken as seriously.

"I think the floodgates have opened for white women," Union said. "I don't think it's a coincidence whose pain has been taken seriously.

"Whose pain we have showed historically and continued to show. Whose pain is tolerable and whose pain is intolerable. And whose pain needs to be addressed now.

"If those people hadn't been Hollywood royalty," she said. "If they hadn't been approachable. If they hadn't been people who have had access to parts and roles and true inclusion in Hollywood, would we have believed?"

Also in October, actress Lupita Nyong'o was the first Black woman to publicly accuse Weinstein of sexual assault, describing the details in a New York Times op-ed. In his denials of wrongdoing, Weinstein has not specifically named any of his more than 50 white female accusers. But he made a public statement responding to Nyong'o's claim — to flat-out deny it and put the blame on her.

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

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#MeToo: Tarana Burke Notes Progress, Wants More for Black Women

"We can't wait for white folks to decide our trauma is worth focusing on," Burke said.

Tarana Burke is reflecting on the movement she created more than 12 years ago, but it's only been one year since its historic rise worldwide. It has led to women speaking out very publicly against assault. And now that it's been endorsed by the upper echelons of white women, we can celebrate its existence.

On Monday, Burke wrote on Twitter that her work supports all sexual assault survivors, but it "has always centered on Black and Brown women and girls. And it always will…"

So when she heard about Lee Daniels making a Me Too comedy, she expressed objections, saying, "We have to get in front of that."

"To put Me Too and comedy in the same sentence is so deeply offensive… that you think in this moment when we're still unpacking the issue that you can write a comedy about it."

Burke doesn't think the media really cares about the stories of Black women and other women of color.

"We can't wait for white folks to decide that our trauma is worth centering on when we know that it's happening," she told the New York Times.

"We know that there are people, whether they're in entertainment or not, who are ravaging our community. We have to be proactive, unfortunately without the benefit of massive exposure. That's our reality, but it always has been."

The majority of Black women in Hollywood have kept their experiences with sexual assault a secret. But there are a few exceptions.

Gabrielle Union has been, according to Burke, the only woman who not only speaks about her story but also advocates. Few others — Mary J. Blige, Queen Latifah, Fantasia Barrino, and Lupita Nyong'o — have talked about it publicly.

"There is knowing that even if you're not trying to bring down a Black man, a large segment of the population will say 'We don't believe her' because of all these things that we normalize," Burke said.

She recalled when a reporter wanted to do a story on R. Kelly and no one would go on record.

"A lot of folks have slid under the radar," she commented.

While she believes the Black community has doubled down on that thinking, she does note progress.

"You could not have had this kind of public discourse with this many people saying that they believe us — we literally have an example in Anita Hill," she told Paper Magazine. "We don't even have to guess what it would've been like or could've been like or what people would've said 20 years ago, we saw it."

In collaboration with the New York Women's Foundation, Burke's Me Too is helping to fund groups serving communities of color, immigrants, and LGBTQ people.

The "Fund for the MeToo Movement and Allies," awarded $840,000 to the DC Rape Crisis center in Washington, the Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective in Los Angeles, the Firecracker Foundation in Lansing, Michigan, Black Women's Blueprint and the Violence Intervention Program, both in New York; Equality Labs, a national group; and the Los Angeles-based FreeFrom, which works with survivors of domestic violence.

The partnership's goal is to raise $5 million per year.

"This is about supporting the people who support the people," Burke said.

Reader Question: Why do you think Black women's stories of sexual assault have been largely unheard or drowned out?

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In a statement distributed by her Italian lawyer, Asia Argento claims she and her then boyfriend Anthony Bourdain decided to answer Bennett's plea for financial help on the condition that Bennett would no longer intrude on their lives. She said that she and Bennett were only friends.

"I am deeply shocked and hurt by having read news that is absolutely false. I have never had any sexual relationship with Bennett," Argento said.

She included that it was an "exorbitant request of money" (reportedly $3.5 million) to her following her exposure following the Weinstein accusations.

Bennett's attorney Gordon K. Sattro said asked for the media to "give our client some time and space. Jimmy is going to take the next 24 hours, or longer, to prepare his response. We ask that you respect our client's privacy during this time."

The Times reported they received the documents "through encrypted email by an unidentified party," and that they included "a selfie dated May 9, 2013, of the two lying in bed."

A spokesperson for The New York Times told Reuters: "We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting, which was based on verified documents and multiple sources."

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Argento Says She Never Had a Sexual Relationship with Bennett

The New York Times stands by its report.

In a statement distributed by her Italian lawyer, Asia Argento claims she and her then boyfriend Anthony Bourdain decided to answer Jimmy Bennett's plea for financial help on the condition that Bennett would no longer intrude on their lives. She said that she and Bennett were only friends.

"I am deeply shocked and hurt by having read news that is absolutely false. I have never had any sexual relationship with Bennett," Argento said.

She included that it was an "exorbitant request of money" (reportedly $3.5 million) to her following her exposure following the Weinstein accusations.

Bennett's attorney Gordon K. Sattro said asked for the media to "our client some time and space. Jimmy is going to take the next 24 hours, or longer, to prepare his response. We ask that you respect our client's privacy during this time."

The Times reported they received the documents "through encrypted email by an unidentified party," and that they included "a selfie dated May 9, 2013, of the two lying in bed."

A spokesperson for The New York Times told Reuters: "We are confident in the accuracy of our reporting, which was based on verified documents and multiple sources."

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