Simone Askew Becomes First Black Woman to Lead West Point's Cadets

Askew will assume the highest position of the cadet chain of command.

U.S. Military Academy Class of 2018 Cadet Simone Askew was selected First Captain of the Corps of Cadets, the highest position in the cadet chain of command. / 2nd Lt. Austin LaChance

Simone Askew, drawn to a career in the military at an early age, is now making history in the field as the first African American woman to lead the U.S. Military Academy at West Point's Corps of Cadets — the highest position in the cadet chain of command.


Askew, 20, will assume her duties as first captain for the 2017-18 academic year on August 14 at the prestigious, predominantly male public institution founded in 1802. She currently leads 1,502 cadets as the Regimental Commander of Cadet Basic Training II.

As first captain, Askew will be responsible for the overall performance of approximately 4,400 Corps of Cadets. Her duties will also include implementing a class agenda and acting as a liaison between the Corps and the administration.

"Simone truly exemplifies our values of duty, honor, country," Brig. Gen. Steven W. Gilland, commandant of cadets, said in a statement.

"Her selection is a direct result of her hard work, dedication and commitment to the Corps over the last three years. I know Simone and the rest of our incredibly talented leaders within the Class of 2018 will provide exceptional leadership to the Corps of Cadets in the upcoming academic year."

A native of Fairfax, Va., Askew is an international history major and a member of the Army West Point Crew team. She is also developing leaders as the Cadet-in-Charge of the Elevation Initiative.

Not only did Askew hold the highest female Recondo score during Combat Field Training II for the class of 2018, she is a graduate of Air Assault School, an EXCEL Scholar, a member of the Phi Alpha Theta Honorary National History Society and a recipient of the Black Engineer of the Year Award for Military Leadership.

Askew also made history at Fairfax High School as the founder of the Black Student Union. In addition, she was the president of her class as well as captain of the volleyball team.

Askew's mother, Pam, told NBC Washington that as a third grader, her daughter expressed interest in pursuing a military career while watching midshipman march into a Navy football game.

"She saw them all in formation and rose up and asked me, 'What does it take to lead that?'" her mother said.

She added that her daughter "takes a lot of pride in West Point and she has always been a leader."

Askew received appointments to both the Naval Academy and West Point but had an affinity for the Army.

Pat Locke was one of West Point's first females. Locke graduated in 1980 and had a career as an air defense artillery officer for 21 years. She currently is Askew's mentor.

Her mentee becoming the first Black woman to assume duties as first captain is highly significant for Locke.

"It's unbelievable for me that this has happened in my lifetime," she told NBC Washington. "I didn't think I was going to see it."

The U.S. Military Academy at West Point has a total undergraduate enrollment of 4,348, of which 81 percent are male students and 19 percent are female students, according to U.S. News & World Reports.

West Point literature states that 1,193 cadets were admitted into the class of 2016, of which 1,002 were men and 191 were women.

Last year, a photo of 16 Black women in the class of 2016 with raised fists circulated social media. The academy began receiving complaints that the photo violated a code of conduct regulations, "a list of political do's and don'ts for service members and cautions against 'partisan political activity' when in uniform."

According to the New York Times, "The 16 cadets in the photo represented all but one of the Black women in a graduating class of about 1,000, a meager 1.7 percent."

The photo was not political, but rather was intended to demonstrate unity and pride. The young women took several spur-of-the-moment shots recreating "old corps" photos in a nod to the school's 19th century predecessors.

School officials conducted an inquiry and found the women did not violate regulations and no punitive action was taken. Lt. Gen. Robert L. Caslen Jr., the academy superintendent, said raised or "clenched" fists have been used by other cadets and even himself.

"Groups at West Point have used the clenched-fists in the past year to represent support for a team, or pride in serving the Army and Nation," Caslen wrote.

Askew breaking ground in her position is of significance to current Black female cadets and those to come.

"It's a great step, not only for women, but for African American women," Askew's younger sister, Nina, said.

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

 

70 Percent of Irish Women Voted to Legalize Abortion in Ireland Creating Landslide Victory

A most conservative country when it comes to abortion rights begins to wake up to the logical conclusion that if your gender can't bear children, you should probably stop mansplaining and man-deciding.

Presiding Officer Carmel McBride prepares the polling station for the referendum on liberalizing abortion law . / REUTERS

UPDATE: May 26, 2018

Ireland has voted to repeal its abortion ban. The Irish Times exit poll suggested that women voted by 70 percent in favor of legalizing abortion.

ORIGINAL STORY

Ireland is one of Europe's most socially conservative countries, with one of the world's strictest bans on abortion. Residents went to the polls on Friday for a "once in a generation opportunity" to decide whether to liberalize or maintain the country's abortion laws.

For Americans, conservatives trying to control abortion rights using religion sound all too familiar.

Read More Show Less

Racist Train Rider Charged with Hate Crime for Rant at Black Woman: Video

"I'll smack the [expletive] out of you, you loud mouth monkey [expletive]," Edward Ruggiero said to Soraya Orelien.

FACEBOOK

Being a racist is ignorant and costly.

The Queens, N.Y., district attorney on Wednesday charged Edward Ruggiero, who was caught on video hurling racist insults at a Black woman on the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR), with a hate crime.

Read More Show Less

Jada Pinkett Smith Shares Her Struggle with Severe Hair Loss

"'Oh my God, am I going bald?' It was one of those times in my life when I was literally shaking with fear," Pinkett Smith said.

Jada Pinkett Smith / FACEBOOK

Hairstyles have both cultural and political significance within the Black community. From locs to Afros to press and curls, the intricacies of hairstyles are especially understood among Black women. It's an extension of self-expression.

Read More Show Less

Calls for Boutique Boycott After Black Attorney and Daughter Falsely Accused of Theft, Handcuffed

"My daughter, my baby, had to go through this and had to deal with all these lies and harm to her physical body, as well as to her emotional state," said Nancy Bedard.

Last week, the cops were called on three Black teens falsely accused of shoplifting at a Nordstrom Rack in St. Louis, Mo. And now there are calls for a boycott of a vintage boutique in gentrified Brooklyn, N.Y., where a Black attorney and her daughter were racially profiled.

Read More Show Less

Salma Hayek Calls for Male Stars to Get Pay Cut

"We all have to be part of the adjustment. That's one idea. I'm going to be hated for it. I hope I can get a job after this!" Hayek said.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — Mexican American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women.

Read More Show Less

Even Black Grandmothers Aren't Safe During Traffic Stops: Video

"Shut the f*** up." Police officer resigns after video proves he "lost his cool and his temper."

YOUTUBE

Routine police traffic stops have been notoriously dangerous for Blacks in America, resulting in the deaths of Sandra Bland, Philando Castile and Samuel DuBose, to name a few. But an unarmed, 65-year-old Black woman, a grandmother, would be safe when stopped by cops, right? Wrong.

Read More Show Less