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Olympic Medalist Credited as 'Athlete's wife' by Media

Corey Cogdell-Unrein's achievement was not enough for the media, which referred to her only in the context of her NFL player husband.

Corey Cogdell-Unrein. Photo via Instagram

Taking home the bronze medal for women's trap shooting for the United States on Sunday was not enough of an accomplishment for Olympian Corey Cogdell-Unrein, according to some media outlets. Headlines regarding Cogdell-Unrein's victory referred to the athlete as the wife of an NFL player.


A Chicago Tribune headline said, "Corey Cogdell, wife of Bears lineman Mitch Unrein, wins bronze in Rio." And when posting the article on Twitter, the publication used a similar headline:

 

Twitter users slammed the publication for focusing on her husband rather than Cogdell-Unrein. Users responded negatively, and some proposed alternative headlines.

On Monday, following the firestorm on Twitter, the Tribune sent out another tweet.

Indeed, Cogdell-Unrein is impressive in her own right.

Cogdell-Unrein is competing in her third Olympics. She also earned a bronze medal in 2008 in Beijing. On Sunday, she hit 13 out of 15 targets, with her last one earning her the medal. Cogdell-Unrein's win earned the United States its sixth medal. (Currently the U.S. has 19 medals.)

"They are very similar as I won bronze in 2008 in a shoot-off as well," she said of her second victory compared to her first. "But I think it is different, because in 2008, I was two years into the sport. Now I have been competing for almost 10 [years], so I am a different athlete and I felt more prepared coming into these Games."

Sexism in Sports

Female athletes frequently face different standards when compared to men in the sports world. The Cambridge University Press published a study last week, "Aesthetics, athletics and the olympics," which highlights stark disparities between how male and female Olympians are written about by the media and shows that the Chicago Tribune's article about Cogdell-Unrein is in fact not that far from the norm.

"Using the Cambridge English Corpus (CEC) and the Sports Corpus, multi-billion word databases of written and spoken English language from a huge range of media sources, experts at Cambridge University Press have analysed millions of words relating to men and women and how they are described in language associated with the Olympic sports," the study explains.

According to the findings:

"Notable terms that cropped up as common word associations or combinations for women, but not men, in sport include 'aged', 'older', 'pregnant' and 'married' or 'un-married'. The top word combinations for men in sport, by contrast, are more likely to be adjectives like 'fastest', 'strong', 'big', 'real' and 'great' — all words regularly heard to describe male Olympians such as Usain Bolt.

"When it comes to performance, it seems as though men also have the competitive edge: we see 'men' or 'man' associated with verbs such as 'mastermind', 'beat', 'win', 'dominate' and 'battle', whereas 'woman' or 'women' is associated with verbs such as 'compete', 'participate' and 'strive'."

Related Story: Mansplaining for Soccer Pay Gap

Earlier this year, members of the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) accusing the U.S. Soccer Federation (USSF) of wage discrimination, citing the higher pay earned by the male soccer team. Players on the women's team cited the fact that the men were compensated $9 million for a 2014 World Cup victory, compared to the $2 million the female team garnered for their win the following year.

The USSF provided numerous reasons for the differences in pay, including the fact that the women had negotiated for a different pay structure. However, the federation also cited maternity leave as a contributing factor and called providing it "revolutionary."

Related Story: Serena Williams, New York Times and Body Image

Like in Cogdell-Unrein's case, female athletes are frequently presented differently than their male counterparts by the media. Last year, the New York Times came under fire for its demeaning portrayal of tennis star Serena Williams.

Just one day before her Wimbledon victory last year, the Times published an article with the headline, "Tennis's Top Women Balance Body Image With Ambition." The context of the article compared Williams' physique to that of other female tennis players and added that the latter do not wish to emulate Williams' body type.

Writer Ben Rothenberg writes of Williams' "large biceps and mold-breaking muscular frame" and also quotes the tennis star as saying, "I'm really happy with my body type, and I'm really proud of it."

However, he then quotes white female tennis players who have said they don't want to look like Williams. In addition, the Times later sent a tweet accompanying the article, not highlighting Williams' accomplished tennis career but rather her allegedly undesirable body type.

The Conversation

Serena Williams Breaks Her Silence on US Open Controversy

Meanwhile, Williams' husband slams a New York Times study, which tries to discredit her claim about the treatment of women in professional tennis.

Serena Williams continues to dispute comments that she received coaching during her matchup with Naomi Osaka at the US Open final on Sept. 8.

In an interview with an Australian talk show, The Project, scheduled to air next Sunday, Williams refutes the remark her coach Patrick Mouratoglou made about gesturing to her from the stands. She denies cheating.

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Jesse Jackson Calls Racist Serena Williams Cartoon 'Despicable'

The Herald Sun editor Damon Johnston stands by the cartoon, meanwhile the National Association of Black Journalists slams it.

Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka / YOUTUBE

UPDATE: Sept. 11, 2018 at 6:12 a.m. ET

In response to massive criticism from across the globe regarding the cartoon, Herald Sun editor Damon Johnston is backing editorial cartoonist Mark Knight.

Johnston said in a statement on Tuesday: "A champion tennis player had a mega tantrum on the world stage, and Mark's cartoon depicted that. It had nothing to do with gender or race."

But the U.S.-based National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) disagrees with the Herald Sun, and calls the cartoon "Sambo-like."

"The Sept. 10 cartoon not only exudes racist, sexist caricatures of both women, but Williams' depiction is unnecessarily Sambo-like." NABJ said in a statement. "The art of editorial cartooning is a visual dialogue on the issues of the day, yet this cartoon grossly and inaccurately depicts two women of color at the US Open, one of the grandest stages of professional sports."

ORIGINAL STORY

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. is firing back at a newspaper cartoonist for a racist depiction of Serena Williams, which perpetuates stereotypes about Black women.

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UPDATE: Serena Williams Fined $17,000 by US Open, Male Tennis Pros Have Said Worse to Umpires Without Penalty

Williams' "thief" comment to Carlos Ramos amounted to $10,000 of the imposed fines. James Blake and Andy Roddick comment on Twitter.

The US Open tournament referee's office fined Serena Williams a total of $17,000 for three code violations — $10,000 for "verbal abuse" of chair umpire Carlos Ramos, $4,000 for being warned for coaching and $3,000 for breaking her racket, according to The Associated Press. The funds will come out of her prize money of $1.85 million as the runner-up.

The $10,000 fine for "verbal abuse" is the largest fine of the U.S. Open so far.

Williams called Ramos a "thief" and demanded an apology for his accusation that she was cheating. However, James Blake tweeted that he's said worse to umpires:

Andy Roddick admits to saying worse as well.

Meanwhile, Williams continues to be subjected to both sexism and racism:

Meanwhile, Williams continues to be subjected to both sexism and racism:

The man who killed tennis stars Serena and Venus Williams' half-sister only served a 12-year sentence.

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White Firefighter Yells 'Black B***H' at EMT While on the Job

A Black EMT filed a formal complaint with the department's Equal Employment Opportunity office.

REUTERS

A Black EMT filed a complaint in Brooklyn, N.Y., after a firefighter shouted a racial insult at her while the two were on duty.

According to reports, rescue teams were scrambling to get to Starrett City last week, where thousands of pedestrians were left without power due to a blackout, when a "tense discussion broke out."

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Citing Trump, Some Republican Women to Vote Democratic in Ohio Election

In interviews with a dozen women, mostly Republicans, in the Midwestern state's 12th Congressional District, several said they would buck their voting habits to support the Democratic candidate on Aug. 7.

Democratic candidate Danny O'Connor meets with campaign volunteers ahead of a special election in Ohio's 12th congressional district in Dublin, Ohio, U.S., July 15, 2018. / REUTERS

(Reuters) — Becky von Zastrow often votes Republican in her affluent central Ohio suburb — but her dissatisfaction with U.S. President Donald Trump has convinced her to back the Democrat in a special-election test for both parties next month.

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Waitress Who Body-slammed Male Groper Says, 'We Deal With a Lot'

"Despite the #Metoo movement forcing industries to re-examine their sexual-predatory behavior towards women, the service industry is lagging behind."

YouTube

The last thing any woman wants to deal with is the uninvited attention of a man's hand mysteriously finding its way onto her hind parts — especially if you're a waitress just trying to finish your shift in the middle of the night. Ask a Savannah, Ga., waitress, weighing in at 115 pounds, who slammed her male fondler to the ground inside of a pizzeria after he unjustifiably grabbed her backside while on the job.

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Uber Under Investigation for Gender Discrimination: Report

Leadership remains almost completely white and male, making the claims hardly a shock.

Ridesharing service Uber is being investigated by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for gender discrimination, the Wall Street Journal has reported.

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