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Nancy Pelosi Looms as Impediment to Democrats' Hopes in November Elections. Time for New Leadership?

Terrible approval numbers and poor reputation caused the Democratic upset winner in the Pennsylvania special election to conspicuously disrespect her.

REUTERS

As Democrats celebrate victories in primaries and special elections nationwide — in areas Republicans have traditionally been victorious — the GOP is looking every which way to maintain control of Congress. One strategy the Republican Party employed is very telling of the state of the Democratic Party, though.


In Pennsylvania, Republicans connected House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) to Conor Lamb, the moderate Democrat who won the U.S. House race in his state on Tuesday, to steer voters away from him.

Lamb, 33, said while campaigning that he would not vote for Pelosi, who turns 78 this month, to remain the Democratic Party's leader. Republican ads claimed that Lamb, who served in the United States Marine Corps, would change his tune as soon as he won the race.

The fact that Republicans used Pelosi, who has an approval rating of 28.7 percent, as a con against someone representing the Democratic Party speaks volumes on her status in Washington. But Republicans are not the only ones tired of her. On the eve of the election Lamb said it's time to replace Pelosi.

"I think it's clear that this Congress is not working for people," he said, according to the Post-Gazette. "I think we need new leadership on both sides."

And earlier this week on MSNBC Lamb was asked, "When you arrive in Washington —assuming you win this election — do you think Nancy Pelosi should go?"

Lamb responded, "I have said that I think we need new leadership at the top of both parties in the House. So, I would like to see someone besides Nancy Pelosi run, and that's who I would support."

Lamb is hardly the only member of Pelosi's party to say it's time for her to go. Rep. Linda Sanchez, also of California, said in October the time has come to let the new generation take over.

"I do think we have this real breadth and depth of talent within our caucus and I do think it's time to pass a torch to a new generation of leaders and I want to be a part of that transition," she said on C-SPAN's "Newsmakers." "I want to see that happen. I think we have too many great members here that don't always get the opportunities that they should. I would like to see that change."

Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) reignited calls for Pelosi to call it quits after she defended John Conyers, a former representative who was accused of sexual harassment against his female staffers.

"But my point is that my positions on party leadership are very clear," he said on MSNBC in December. "And I've been calling for our leader to step down and allow a new generation of leaders to step up and lead our party forward for a long time. But what I don't want to do is distract from the fact that this is a very serious issue."

A Democratic source reported to Axios of Pelosi, "She used to be retributional. Now she's more inclusive."

Axios suggested that "Pelosi is more likely to be the bridge to a younger generation" when compared to one possible competitor, 78-year-old House Democrat Whip Steny Hoyer.

Pelosi tried to build a bridge to distance herself from Hoyer's status as an old white man in January when she accused "five white guys" — including Hoyer — of trying to solve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) controversy.

"The 'five white guys' I call them, you know," she said, adding, "Are they going to open a hamburger stand next or what?" (The comment was a reference to Five Guys, a popular burger joint.)

Perhaps Pelosi should stop pointing white fingers.

A look at her staff also tells a story. Pelosi has equal representation of men and women, but for staffers whose ethnicity could be determined, there is one Black person and one Latino (one staff member's race could not be identified). If Pelosi wants to be a bridge, she should start paying more attention to who will be making decisions when she's not around anymore — and who will decide her fate. Her district, California's 12th Congressional District, is 52.8 percent white, 31 percent Asian, 15 percent Hispanic and 6.0 percent Black. And the NBC/GenForward survey indicates that minority millennials may be more politically active than their white counterparts — 17 percent of Asians, 15 percent of Blacks, 14 percent of Latinx and 13 percent of whites responded yes when asked if they have attended a political event, rally or organized protest since Trump's election.

So who would Pelosi be a "bridge" to? A generation of up-and-coming voters who don't believe the Democratic Party represents them.

According to a September poll from NBC News and GenForward, 42 percent of young adults have an unfavorable view of the Democratic Party — and only 43 percent have a favorable view. Forty-six percent of respondents said they don't believe the Democratic Party cares about people like them.

And while young adults are still more likely to favor the Democratic Party over the GOP, Democrats do not have a very strong hold. The same survey asked if respondents planned to vote Democrat or Republican in the next election. The majority — 41 percent — said they were not sure. When asked which way they leaned toward, 57 percent said they were still not sure.

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

The Conversation

​​Kavanaugh Supporter Compares Attempted Rape Claims to 'Rough Horseplay'

The former law clerk for Clarence Thomas joins in the belittling and discrediting of Christine Blasey Ford as she tries to tell her story of sexual assault.

Carrie Severino, spokesperson for the Judicial Crisis Network, questioned Christine Blasey Ford's accusations of Brett Kavanaugh's behavior in high school saying 35-year-old memories could be of just "rough horseplay" instead of attempted rape.

When a CNN anchor challenged Severino's description of Ford's account as a range of behaviors from boorish rough horseplay to attempted rape, Severino backtracked saying it was attempted rape that Ford had alleged.

Severino additionally said that Ford's "perception is one story," seemingly that can be refuted, while the "[Kavanaugh] says it didn't happen at all, so under any interpretation… he says he was not at a party and it didn't happen period."

Judicial Crisis Network has spent at least $4.5 million in ad buys to confirm Kavanaugh, with plans to spend more, and Severino is the former law clerk for Clarence Thomas. Other Kavanaugh allies publicized letters from two former girlfriends to attest to his character.

The discrediting of Ford's story started with Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley's statement about the allegations being part of "Democrats' tactics" concerning Kavanaugh's confirmation process.

President Trump recently called Kavanaugh a "great gentleman," and said: "I feel so badly for him that he's going through this," Trump said. "This is not a man that deserves this."

He also called the process of investigating the allegation of sexual assault a "little delay," and said it was "ridiculous" to think that Kavanaugh might withdraw his nomination.

Some Republican senators such as Orrin Hatch of Utah and John Cornyn of Texas questioned the credibility of the woman who claims to have undergone sexual assault and subsequent trauma, proven by therapist notes.

Cornyn said he was concerned by "gaps" in the account: "The problem is, Dr. Ford can't remember when it was, where it was or how it came to be."

Hatch said he saw "lots of reasons" not to believe Ford's accusation.

"He is a person of immense integrity," the senator said of Kavanaugh. "I have known him for a long time. He has always been straightforward, honest, truthful and a very, very decent man."

"They just don't get it" became a popular way to describe senators' reaction to sexual violence, wrote Anita Hill, in a recent op-ed in the New York Times.

Hill, who famously was publicly discredited when coming forward about Clarence Thomas, said, "With years of hindsight, mounds of evidence of the prevalence and harm that sexual violence causes individuals and our institutions, as well as a Senate with more women than ever, 'not getting it' isn't an option for our elected representatives. In 2018, our senators must get it right."

Related Story: Woman Accusing Brett Kavanaugh of Sexual Assault Willing to Testify Before Senate Panel

Related Story: Cranky Old White Men Passing Hysterical Stories About Kavanaugh's Accuser

Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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Progressive Black Woman Defeats Middle of the Road Incumbent White Male Democrat

Ayanna Pressley is likely to become the first Black woman to be elected to Congress in Massachusetts' history.

Ayanna Pressley / REUTERS

In a wave of unprecedented primary wins by diverse, younger and progressive candidates, before the Nov. 6 election, a Black woman is set to make history as the first to be elected to U.S. Congress in Massachusetts.

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Obama Announces First Round of 2018 Midterm Endorsements, More Than Half Are Women

One of the candidates who earned the former president's support is Stacey Abrams, a Black woman running for governor of Georgia.

REUTERS

Former President Barack Obama announced on Wednesday that he is endorsing 81 Democrats for the upcoming midterm elections and 48 of the candidates are women. Among those listed include Stacey Abrams. If elected, Abrams would make history as the first Black woman to become governor of Georgia.

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Trump Threatens To 'Shutdown Government' If He Doesn't Get His Racist-Baiting Wall

If the Mexican government isn't going to pay for it, as he promised, shouldn't he go south to shut down their government?

President Trump has alluded to doing whatever it takes to get Democrats to jump on board with his plan for immigration reform.

Trump made the campaign promise to his anti-immigrant base: "I'll have Mexico pay for that wall."

But now that it's apparent that was an empty promise and midterm elections are right around the corner, he's threatening to infringe upon the lives of U.S. residents by closing the government.

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Citing Trump, Some Republican Women to Vote Democratic in Ohio Election

In interviews with a dozen women, mostly Republicans, in the Midwestern state's 12th Congressional District, several said they would buck their voting habits to support the Democratic candidate on Aug. 7.

Democratic candidate Danny O'Connor meets with campaign volunteers ahead of a special election in Ohio's 12th congressional district in Dublin, Ohio, U.S., July 15, 2018. / REUTERS

(Reuters) — Becky von Zastrow often votes Republican in her affluent central Ohio suburb — but her dissatisfaction with U.S. President Donald Trump has convinced her to back the Democrat in a special-election test for both parties next month.

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Black People Are Being Poisoned in Alabama. Is Louisiana Next?

Protests of big business and government inaction persist against allowing people to become diseased and disposable.

YOUTUBE

Ten days of protests continue in Louisiana over crude oil pipeline preparations by residents and activists as big oil business stands to infiltrate and bring deadly toxins into Black communities like St. James — nicknamed "Cancer Alley."

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Maxine Waters' Office Evacuated Due to 'Anne Thrax' Package

Amid recent death threats against the congresswoman, a package suspected to contain Anthrax wasn't taken lightly.

FACEBOOK

Someone noticed a suspicious package sent to Rep. Maxine Waters' (D-Calif.) district office in South Los Angeles on Tuesday afternoon addressed to "Anne Thrax." As Waters has recently received death threats, the authorities were contacted.

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