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NAACP in Houston Denounces 'White Lives Matter' Protest

The local White Lives Matter group is connected to the Aryan Renaissance Society, a neo-Nazi group.

The local White Lives Matter group is connected to the Aryan Renaissance Society, a neo-Nazi group.


By Sheryl Estrada

KTRK-TV Houston

At the NAACP Houston headquarters on Monday, chapter members, community groups and civil rights groups spoke to the public condemning the White Lives Matter protest that took place on Sunday.

Dr. James Douglass, the chapter's president, said the protesters had a right to free speech but affirmed their message is racist.

"While they criticize the NAACP for not denouncing a movement that has been productive in bringing awareness to the racial disparity in this country, they themselves espoused totally racist positions," Douglass said.

About 20 White Lives Matter supporters stood in front of the NAACP's office Sunday to protest against the organization because it has not denounced the Black Lives Matter movement. The group's organizer said the movement is violent toward white civilians and white police officers.

Some of the protesters were armed with assault rifles and carried Confederate flags. The NAACP said they only found out about the protest the day it took place, and they made sure no one was at the headquarters. 

Related Story: Armed 'White Lives Matter' Group Protests at NAACP in Houston

According to KPRC-TV, The Anti-Defamation League said the organizers of the rally are tied to the Aryan Renaissance Society, a local white supremacist group.

One of the men with a connection, Scott Lacy, said on Sunday the NAACP is "one of the most racist groups in America."

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At the rally, a protester held a sign that read: "14 words." It refers to the 14 words of the white supremacist creed, which calls for the protection of white people.

"White lives have mattered since Europeans first set foot in the Americas," U.S. Rep. Al Green (D-Texas) said. "White lives mattered during slavery. White lives mattered during discrimination, which was lawful. Even as discrimination continues today, white lives still matter. Can we say the same of Black lives?"

He also addressed criticism of Black Lives Matter.

"We don't always support all of the things that happen in these movements but we do support the notion that Black lives matter ... we want that taken to the four corners of the Earth," he said.

Green said he will contact the Department of Justice to ensure it is aware of the protest.

Ashton P. Woods, an activist with BLM in Houston, commented that one of the White Lives Matter protesters was wearing a Trump campaign shirt, and he urged people to vote in the presidential election.

"That ought to tell you who to vote for in November," Woods said.

 The Story Behind White Lives Matter

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) White Lives Matter is "a small but virulent movement" and its "main activists, to put it plainly, are unvarnished white supremacists." The Texas-based Aryan Renaissance Society has described itself as the leading force behind the White Lives Matter movement.

The group's website describes the movement as "dedicated to promotion of the white race and taking positive action as a united voice against issues facing our race." It writes that issues including homosexuality, mixed relationships and illegal immigration are unraveling the nation.

The SPLC finds that the agenda of the group should be of concern to all Americans:

"WLM activists are hard at work, doing their best to seed yet another racist concept into the consciousness of American whites as they seek to build a whites-only nation. Given the atmosphere in the United States today, that should worry all Americans."

Two of the major issues White Lives Matter organizers said they have with the Black Lives Matter movement are perceived anti-white and anti-police sentiments.

In a statement on BLM's website, "11 Major Misconceptions About the Black Lives Matter Movement," those issues are debunked.

One misconception is that the movement hates white people:

"The statement 'Black lives matter' is not an anti-white proposition. Contained within the statement is an unspoken but implied 'too,' as in 'Black lives matter, too,' which suggests that the statement is one of inclusion rather than exclusion.

"However, those white people who continue to mischaracterize the affirmation of the value of Black life as being anti-white are suggesting that in order for white lives to matter, Black lives cannot. That is a foundational premise of white supremacy. It is antithetical to what the Black Lives Matter movement stands for, which is the simple proposition that 'black lives also matter.'"

Another misconception is that the movement hates police officers:

"Police officers are people. Their lives have inherent value. This movement is not an anti-people movement; therefore it is not an anti-police-officer movement. Most police officers are just everyday people who want to do their jobs, make a living for their families, and come home safely at the end of their shift. This does not mean, however, that police are not implicated in a system that criminalizes Black people."

Police Investigate Teen's Threats to Lynch N*****s in Racist Snapchat Video

NAACP says: While the state has hate crime laws, they're not often enforced.

A white teen, social media identified as a student at Southington High School in Connecticut, made a racist video that included threats of lynching Black people and claims that he "hung 12 Black men from a tree just this night."

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Jasmine Headley, age 23, was carrying her child into a city agency building in Brooklyn where SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) is located, and sat on the floor to wait as there were no more chairs. A bystander, Nyashia Ferguson, who goes by the name Monae Sinclair on Facebook, reported she saw a security guard confront Headley and the two got into an argument. Security called the police, and when they arrived, Headley tried to explain, but they cut her off. That's when things got ugly.

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Using Undocumented Immigrants for ​Labor is the Norm at Trump's Golf Club

"We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money," said a woman working at Trump National Golf Club.

As President Trump sends troops to the U.S.-Mexico border to "defend" (white) America against the caravans of Brown people and bar some from asylum in the U.S., the history of hiring undocumented workers at his properties in New Jersey and Florida continues to come to light.

Trump has a problem with undocumented immigrants seeking asylum, but not when they are hired to wash his clothes or make his bed.

Victorina Morales, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, reportedly crossed the border in 1999 and has worked at the at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J, since 2013, The New York Times reported Thursday.

According to a spokesperson for his business organization, she would be one of tens of thousands of people to be employed by Trump, and would be terminated if she was undocumented. Sandra Diaz, 46, from Costa Rica was another.

Both Morales and Diaz, during their stints, washed the Trump family's clothes in a special detergent, made beds and dusted.

"There are many people without papers," said Ms. Diaz, who said she witnessed several people being hired whom she knew to be undocumented.

Morales was initially pleased with her job because she was paid and tipped well, often times by Trump. But her sentiments changed when he ran for president.

"I'm tired of being humiliated and treated like a stupid person," she said in Spanish during a brief interview. "We're just immigrants who don't have papers."

During his campaign in 2016, when he referred to Mexicans as rapists and criminals, he promised to mandate E-Verify, a federal tool to verify employment eligibility, and requested $23 million in his 2019 budget proposal to expand the program for nationwide use. He also bragged when a new Trump hotel opened in Washington, "We didn't have one illegal immigrant on the job."

"The president has been half-serious about stopping illegal immigration by not taking away the jobs magnet," said Roy Beck, president of NumbersUSA, a group pushing to reduce immigration. Beck said Trump has "let us down in his promise to help American workers" because he hasn't "put his shoulder behind a mandatory E-Verify bill."

Trump signed a "Buy American, Hire American" executive order in 2017 restricting visas, but his Mar-a-Lago golf club also has a history of applying for H-2B visas for hundreds of immigrant workers. The H-2B visa is for "temporary non-agricultural workers."

Morales reports being driven to work by staff to hide the fact that she couldn't legally drive, and that after she presented fake papers for work, she was given another set of fake papers by the Trump Organization to keep her employed there.

Morales had a front row seat on the job to Trump meetings as she was cleaning his villa, even when potential cabinet members were interviewed and when he met with the White House chief of staff.

But that didn't come without experiencing verbal abuse from Trump's staff.

Her attorney Anibal Romero said in a statement Thursday that his clients were called racial epithets and threatened with deportation by a supervisor that ironically, "had employed them despite knowing their undocumented status and even provided them with forged documents."

"We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money," she told the NY Times. "We sweat it out to attend to his every need and have to put up with his humiliation."

Reader Question: Do we need any more proof that he's a liar about everything?

Oklahoma State Senator Says Slavery Was Challenged, So Legal Abortion Should Be, Too

Joseph Silk wants a bill that criminalizes abortion to challenge the Supreme Court decision because the Court once ruled "that slaves were private property and they were wrong."

State Sen. Joseph Silk (R-Broken Bow) is pushing his "Abolition of Abortion in Oklahoma Act," which calls on the state to ignore federal law on abortion. And he's using the argument that states can ignore the Supreme Court because "they were wrong about slavery."

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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.), the only Black Republican in the Senate, opposed President Trump's nomination of Thomas Farr to become a federal judge, on Thursday, ending his chances of confirmation. Trump's choice — an attorney who has supported voter suppression targeting Blacks — caused Scott to defy the leader of his party's wishes.

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Update: Former Police Chief Gets 3 Years in Prison for Framing Black Men

A Black man who was unjustly convicted because of Raimundo Atesiano's actions was deported back to Haiti.

UPDATE: Nov. 28, 2018

Raimundo Atesiano was sentenced to three years in prison for a conspiracy in his department to frame Black people. The former Biscayne Park police chief was allowed him to remain free for two weeks before surrendering to care for his mother, who is dying of leukemia, according to the Miami Herald.

"When I took the job, I was not prepared," Atesiano told a federal judge. "I made some very, very bad decisions."

ORIGINAL STORY

As racial disparities continue to plague the criminal justice system, a former police chief in Florida admitted to purposely sending Black men to prison. Former Biscayne Park Police Chief Raimundo Atesiano acknowledged at his plea hearing in Miami federal court that he told his cops in 2013 to frame three Black residents, one of which was a 16-year-old, for a series of unsolved home and vehicle burglaries in order get a 100 percent clearance on the department's property crimes record.

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Trevor Noah Sounds Off About Another Black Hero Killed By Police

"The Second Amendment was not made for Black folks," said Noah.

Jemel Roberson, a Black hero shot dead by police, was laid to rest last weekend as was Emantic Bradford Jr., an innocent Black 21-year-old male mistakenly identified as a mass shooter in an Alabama mall and also shot dead by police.

"How does this shit keep happening?" Trevor Noah, host of "The Daily Show," asked after discussing the incident.

"The cops are called into a situation. They see a Black person. And then immediately they shoot."

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Black Veteran Racially Profiled in a Yogurt Shop, Cops Offer Canned Apology

Byron Ragland calls for a boycott of the shop. To "punish white supremacy and anti-Black behavior – you hit it hard and you hit it fast right in its pockets," he said.

In response to public backlash on social media, the Kirkland Police Department, which serves the Seattle suburb, offered an apology to Byron Ragland almost two weeks after he was told to leave Menchie's, a frozen yogurt shop, because the owner called 911 as women workers said he "looked suspicious."

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