LeBron James Receives NBA Cares Community Assist Award Presented by Kaiser Permanente

NBA and Kaiser Permanente to donate $10,000 to the LeBron James Family Foundation.

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Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James received the December NBA Cares Community Assist Award presented by Kaiser Permanente (No. 2 on the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies list) in recognition of his continuing work to create positive, long-lasting change in his hometown of Akron and throughout Northeast Ohio, the NBA announced on Jan. 31. The award recognizes an NBA player each month who best reflects the passion that the league and its players share for giving back to their communities.


Kaiser Permanente and the NBA are honoring James for providing educational resources and opportunities to improve the lives of children and families in Akron and the greater Cleveland area. During the holidays, he announced the creation of the I PROMISE School, a new Akron Public School opening in the fall of 2018 inspired by the LeBron James Family Foundation's I Promise program. The school will focus on educating children academically, socially and emotionally while providing comprehensive support and resources to each child's family, and serve as James' vehicle for creating change in his hometown through the power of education.

In December, James expanded on his Foundation's year-round support by surprising families of future I PROMISE School students with convenient access to critical healthcare services and other medical resources through a partnership with Crystal Clinic. James also hosted hundreds of his students for a private trip to the North Pole on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad's Polar Express, a continuation of the I PROMISE program's monthly experiential learning opportunities that he provides for every class throughout the school year. Additionally, he donated thousands of toys to kindergarteners and first- and second-graders across the Akron Public School system, and joined his teammates for the Cavaliers' annual visit to Cleveland Clinic Children's to spread holiday cheer to young patients and their families.

"To be able to support and create opportunities for the kids in Akron who are in danger of falling through the cracks means everything to me because I was one of those kids," said James. "I'm proud and excited to create a school and provide resources that will help these students earn an education that will change their lives and give them a better future."

Before the Cavaliers' home game against the Miami Heat tonight, NBA Cares Ambassador Bob Lanier will present the award to James during an oncourt ceremony. In addition, Kaiser Permanente and the NBA will donate $10,000 to the LeBron James Family Foundation.

The NBA Cares Community Assist Award presented by Kaiser Permanente honors the standard set by NBA Legend David Robinson, who improved the community piece by piece. To learn more, visit http://www.nba.com/communityassist/.

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Kaiser Permanente Researchers Develop New Models for Predicting Suicide Risk

Approach may offer value to health systems and clinicians in targeting interventions to prevent suicide

Originally Published by Kaiser Permanente.

Combining data from electronic health records with results from standardized depression questionnaires better predicts suicide risk in the 90 days following either mental health specialty or primary care outpatient visits, reports a team from the Mental Health Research Network, led by Kaiser Permanente research scientists.

The study, "Predicting Suicide Attempts and Suicide Death Following Outpatient Visits Using Electronic Health Records," conducted in five Kaiser Permanente regions (Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, California and Washington), the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, and the HealthPartners Institute in Minneapolis, was published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Combining a variety of information from the past five years of people's electronic health records and answers to questionnaires, the new models predicted suicide risk more accurately than before, according to the authors. The strongest predictors include prior suicide attempts, mental health and substance use diagnoses, medical diagnoses, psychiatric medications dispensed, inpatient or emergency room care, and scores on a standardized depression questionnaire.

Dr. Simon shares what inspired him to study mental health.

"We demonstrated that we can use electronic health record data in combination with other tools to accurately identify people at high risk for suicide attempt or suicide death," said first author Gregory E. Simon, MD, MPH, a Kaiser Permanente psychiatrist in Washington and a senior investigator at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute.

In the 90 days following an office visit:

  • Suicide attempts and deaths among patients whose visits were in the highest 1 percent of predicted risk were 200 times more common than among those in the bottom half of predicted risk.
  • Patients with mental health specialty visits who had risk scores in the top 5 percent accounted for 43 percent of suicide attempts and 48 percent of suicide deaths.
  • Patients with primary care visits who had scores in the top 5 percent accounted for 48 percent of suicide attempts and 43 percent of suicide deaths.

This study builds on previous models in other health systems that used fewer potential predictors from patients' records. Using those models, people in the top 5 percent of risk accounted for only a quarter to a third of subsequent suicide attempts and deaths. More traditional suicide risk assessment, which relies on questionnaires or clinical interviews only, is even less accurate.

The new study involved seven large health systems serving a combined population of 8 million people in nine states. The research team examined almost 20 million visits by nearly 3 million people age 13 or older, including about 10.3 million mental health specialty visits and about 9.7 million primary care visits with mental health diagnoses. The researchers deleted information that could help identify individuals.

"It would be fair to say that the health systems in the Mental Health Research Network, which integrate care and coverage, are the best in the country for implementing suicide prevention programs," Dr. Simon said. "But we know we could do better. So several of our health systems, including Kaiser Permanente, are working to integrate prediction models into our existing processes for identifying and addressing suicide risk."

Suicide rates are increasing, with suicide accounting for nearly 45,000 deaths in the United States in 2016; 25 percent more than in 2000, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Other health systems can replicate this approach to risk stratification, according to Dr. Simon. Better prediction of suicide risk can inform decisions by health care providers and health systems. Such decisions include how often to follow up with patients, refer them for intensive treatment, reach out to them after missed or canceled appointments — and whether to help them create a personal safety plan and counsel them about reducing access to means of self-harm.

Why Jay-Z Told David Letterman Some Good Has Come from the Trump Presidency

Duo tackles effect of administration in an episode of Letterman's Netflix series.

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Hip-hop icon and businessman Jay-Z sat down with former late night host David Letterman where he referred to the presidency as "actually a great thing."

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White Candidate for State House: ‘I’m a Member of the African American Community’

"I've eaten at many a fish fry held by my 'brothers' and 'sisters,' 'aunts' and 'uncles' in that community," Shipman said in his defense. "I was born a poor Black child," said Steve Martin in "The Jerk."

A Democrat hailing from North Carolina hoping to join the state House claims that he is a part of the African American community.

"I'm a member of the African American community," said Gary Shipman on Sunday. "I've been where you are. I've been in your communities."

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