Interracial Marriage Becoming the Norm in U.S.: Report

The report's findings include that Black men with a bachelor's degree are more than twice as likely as Black women to intermarry.

A scene from the 2016 film “Loving,” which celebrates the commitment of Richard and Mildred Loving (portrayed by Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga).

Interracial marriage is on the rise, making more than a fivefold increase since 1967, when only 3 percent of newlyweds were intermarried, according to a Pew Research Center report released Thursday. However, interracial marriage is more accepted by Democrats than Republicans, and Black men and Asian women are more likely to marry someone of a different race.


In 2015, 17 percent of all newlyweds in the country had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity — the growth coinciding "with shifting societal norms as Americans have become accepting of marriages involving spouses of different races and ethnicities, even within their own families," according to the report.

The 17 percent represents one-in-six newlyweds, while, more broadly, among all married people in 2015,  one-in-10, about 11 million, were intermarried, according to Pew.

Asians were most likely to intermarry, with 29 percent of newlywed Asians married to someone of a different race or ethnicity, followed by Hispanics at 27 percent, Blacks at 18 percent and whites at 11 percent, according to the authors.

When looking at the data of Black newlyweds in the U.S., researchers found that intermarriage is twice as common for Black men as it is for Black women.

"While about one-fourth of recently married Black men (24 percent) have a spouse of a different race or ethnicity, this share is 12 percent among recently married Black women," according to the analysis.

And the difference between Black men and women regarding intermarriage also increases with education.

"For those with a high school diploma or less, 17 percent of men vs. 10 percent of women are intermarried, while among those with a bachelor's degree, Black men are more than twice as likely as Black women to intermarry (30 percent vs. 13 percent)," state researchers.

In 2015, The Brookings Institution published a Social Mobility Memo called "Single Black female BA seeks educated husband: Race, assortative mating and inequality."

It indicated that a large percentage of Black women with college degrees remain unmarried because they seek to only wed a Black, college-educated man.

The study found that married Black women who are college graduates are much more likely to have a husband with a lower level of education (58 percent), compared to whites of a similar background (48 percent).

The authors also noted that the racial gaps in our society offer the "greatest equity challenges of the 21st Century," more so than the marriage gaps.

Inequality toward Black men in America has contributed to the difference in education levels between Black men and women — for example, the racial gap in U.S. arrest rates.

The Pew study released Thursday also found that Asian women are far more likely to intermarry than Asian men. In 2015, just over one-third (36 percent) of newlywed Asian women had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity, while 21 percent of newlywed Asian men had a spouse of a different race.

Loving vs. Virginia

In 1967, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) represented Mildred Jeter, who was Black, and her childhood sweetheart, white construction worker Richard Loving, in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Loving vs. Virginia. The couple was unable to lawfully reside in the state together due to laws banning marriage between Blacks and whites.

The Court ruled that marriage across racial lines was legal throughout the country. Until this ruling, interracial marriages were forbidden in many states.

The Pew report, which is an analysis of Pew surveys, U.S. Census Bureau data and data from the research group NORC at the University of Chicago, was released to mark 50 years since the landmark case.

More Key Findings:

    • About half (49 percent) of Democrats and Independents who lean toward the Democratic Party say the growing number of people of different races marrying each other is a good thing for society. Only 28 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning Independents share that view.
    • Among newlyweds, intermarriage is most common for those in their 30s (18 percent). Even so, 13 percent of newlyweds ages 50 and older are married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.
    • White people living in urban areas are more likely to marry someone of a different race or ethnicity than those in non-urban areas. However, Hispanics and Asians are more likely to intermarry if they live in non-urban areas. And for Blacks the intermarriage rates do not vary by place of residence.
    • The most common intermarriages were between a Hispanic and white spouse, at 42 percent. The next most common was between a white and Asian spouse at 15 percent, followed by a multiracial and white spouse at 12 percent.

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

Scores of South Asia Asylum Seekers Held in Oregon

The detainees have been confined in small cells for up to 22 hours a day with no access to medical treatment, said U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — At least 72 South Asian asylum-seekers are being detained at a federal prison in Oregon after getting caught up in the Trump administration's "zero-tolerance" policy for illegal border-crossers, a U.S. Senator's office said on Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
REUTERS

Steve Bannon, former White House chief strategist, said that slain civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would be "proud" of what President Donald Trump has done for Blacks and Latinos in the U.S.

Bannon was the CEO of Trump's presidential campaign. Trump gained supporters by calling Mexicans rapists, committing to building a wall between Mexico and the U.S., allowing Black people to be physically assaulted at his rallies and lightly disavowing the support of white supremacists.

"Martin Luther King ... he would be proud of what Donald Trump has done for [the] Black and Hispanic working class, okay?" Bannon said on "This Week" Sunday.

On Sunday, King's daughter, Bernice King, CEO of The King Center, re-tweeted a post from The Washington Post reporter Eugene Scott who referenced a similar claim Bannon had made previously. She included a response, simply stating: “Absolutely not."

In May, King tweeted:

Bannon said in March at an event with far-right French politicians that they should "wear" accusations of racism "as a badge of honor."

Let them call you racist. Let them call you xenophobes," he said. “Let them call you nativists. Wear it as a badge of honor. Because every day, we get stronger and they get weaker."

Bannon said on Sunday that he was “talking specifically about Donald Trump and his policies."

“His economic nationalism doesn't care about your race, your religion, your gender, your sexual preference," he said.

The Trump administration's “zero tolerance" immigration policy is currently separating children of undocumented immigrants from their mothers and fathers.

King tweeted on Sunday:

80-year-old White Woman Goes on Racist Facebook Rant: ‘All of us AMERICANS Are so Done’

White fear of not being the majority shines through in diatribe against former next-door neighbor.

FACEBOOK

The mother of a mayor in a New Jersey town is blaming immigrants — who she believes are not Americans — for her son's potential loss in the primary. Her racist rant reflects a fear among some white people of no longer being the majority race.

Read More Show Less

After a Typhoon of Publicity, Harvey Weinstein Charged with Rape

Allowed to turn himself in with pre-arranged bail already taken care of.

REUTERS

There was one more red carpet for Harvey to walk down. At 7:30 this morning, the alleged rapist walked into a Lower Manhattan police station surrounded by cameras flashing and reporters shouting his name.

Read More Show Less

'This is America' Video at 74 Million Views in Six Days, up 8 Million Since Yesterday Afternoon

Childish Gambino's insightful, intelligent and powerful observation of our culture inspires layered analysis.

Race, gun violence and U.S. culture are explored in recording artist Childish Gambino's "This is America" music video, which has gone viral. The video has garnered more than 74 million views on YouTube since it was released on Saturday and the buzz continues to grow.

Read More Show Less

White Yale Student Calls Police on Black Student for Napping in Dorm

A Black graduate student was harassed for falling asleep while studying.

Lolade Siyonbola/ FACEBOOK

Yale University claims it is committed to "maintaining an inclusive community of scholars." However, there's a glaring error in its practices when a white graduate student is either ill prepared or unwilling to live in a diverse and inclusive environment and continues to call the authorities on Black students.

Read More Show Less

Graduating While Black: Students Manhandled on Stage at University of Florida Commencement Ceremony

"It's a situation where time and time again the university has made Black bodies feel unsafe," said graduate Oliver Telusma.

TWITTER

During the University of Florida's (UF) commencement ceremony, a white university graduation marshal decided to stop Black students from celebrating their diplomas with "strolling." He physically forced them off stage. At the pinnacle of their college careers, Black graduates were reminded that racism exists at the university.

Read More Show Less