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Google Women Earn Less than Men, Employee-Reported Data Shows

A spreadsheet created by Google workers points to the highly cited gender pay gap at the tech giant.

REUTERS

A new analysis of pay data at Google once again demonstrates a gender wage gap at the company.


Nearly 1,200 Google staff members in the United States — roughly 2 percent of the company's global workforce — reported their salaries and bonuses in an employee-generated spreadsheet. The data, obtained by The New York Times, illustrates disparities in pay at varying levels.

Google Employee Salary Data

Level One

Women: $40,300

Men: $55,900

Level Two

Women: $76,600

Men: $71,200

Level Three

Women: $106,700

Men: $112,400

Level Four

Women: $125,000

Men: $136,600

Level Five

Women: $153,500

Men: $162,200

Level Six

Women: $193,200

Men: $197,600

Source: NY Times

At level one, women make less than three-quarters of what men earn. The only exception in the data provided is at level two, where the men who self-reported earn 93 percent of what the women earn.

Google Employee Bonus Data

Level One

Women: $3,600

Men: $6,900

Level Two

Women: $7,900

Men: $12,100

Level Three

Women: $17,300

Men: $16,900

Level Four

Women: $24,700

Men: $24,400

Level Five

Women: $31,000

Men: $33,200

Level Six

Women: $40,700

Men: $47,800

Source: NY Times

Women earned slightly higher bonuses at levels three and four, but the difference is not nearly as significant when compared to how much more the men received in bonuses at the other levels.

Google has never applied to compete in the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity competition.

Women make up 31 percent of Google's total employees but only occupy 20 percent of tech roles and a quarter of leadership positions. Women of color represent even less of the company, as Blacks and Hispanics comprise just 2 and 4 percent, respectively, of Google's total workforce. Hispanics and Blacks represent 3 and 1 percent, respectively, of Google's tech workers. For leadership jobs, Hispanics and Blacks each represent 2 percent. Among the DiversityInc Top 50, women represent 46.3 percent of the whole workforce and 32.7 percent of senior management, and Blacks, Latinos and Asians make up 15.6 percent of senior managers.

Alphabet's (Google's parent company) board of directors is about one quarter female. One of the four women on the 15-member board is Shirley Tilghman, former president of Princeton University. While working at Princeton, Tilghman hired Maria Klawe, who now serves as president of Harvey Mudd College, as a dean. When discussing salary, Klawe told Tilghman, "Just pay me what you think is right" — and then grossly underpaid her compared to the other deans.

The data collection for Google reflects 2017 pay data, but the spreadsheet was started in 2015 by former Google employee Erica Baker, reported USA Today, which also viewed the spreadsheet.

According to a former Google employee who reported information to Quora, levels one through three are considered entry-level, levels four through five are mid-career and level six is late career. Managerial roles begin at level four. The employee spreadsheet therefore does not account for senior-level positions, which begin at level seven.

A spokeswoman for the company described the data as "extremely flawed" in a statement to Business Insider.

"The analysis in this story is extremely flawed, as it features an extremely small sample size, and doesn't include location, role, tenure or performance," said Gina Scigliano. "This means that the story is comparing the compensation of, for example, a high-performing Level 5 engineer in the Bay Area with a low-performing Level 5 non-technical employee working in a different location. It doesn't make sense to compare the compensation of these two people. We do rigorous compensation analyses and when you compare like-for-like, women are paid 99.7 percent of what men are paid at Google."

Even salaries for positions at the same level can vary for a number of reasons. A report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) points out that factors such as experience and geographic location can largely impact salaries for similar jobs, resulting in significant differences depending on the industry.

According to the Times, human resources employees at Google do not know a person's gender when determining salary. "Similarly, when an employee's salary is up for annual review, the company takes into account the person's job performance, location and competitive salaries — but the analysts are not informed of the person's gender," the Times also reported.

But the employee-generated spreadsheet is hardly Google's first strike when it comes to questions about wage data — and a company culture that is inclusive for both men and women.

In April the Labor Department accused Google of "systemic" gender pay discrimination and demanded the company provide more data about its wage practices. The company said the task, which would require about 500 work hours and $100,000, would be too expensive (despite Alphabet's self-reported financial growth: Ruth Porat, Alphabet's chief financial officer, said in June of the company's Q2 earnings, "With revenues of $26 billion, up 21% versus the second quarter of 2016 and 23% on a constant currency basis, we're delivering strong growth with great underlying momentum, while continuing to make focused investments in new revenue streams").

And, as noted by Bustle, the data illustrates the importance of transparency and keeping a conversation about salaries alive: "Yet what this data set does demonstrate on a broader scale is 1) how easy it is to share salary information in the interest of more equitable pay, and 2) why that kind of initiative is so important."

Company culture also largely came into question when a 10-page misogynist memo penned by a Google engineer slamming diversity and suggesting women are inferior as leaders was released.

To read James Damore's full memo click here.

The engineer was ultimately fired. But the note was not immediately rebuked by Google's CEO, the company's head of human resources or the chairman of the board. Rather, Danielle Brown, the company's brand new vice president of diversity, integrity and governance, was initially forced to speak out about the incident.

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

The Conversation

Landlords Can Use Facebook to Discriminate Against Black People, Violates Fair Housing Act

"When Facebook uses the vast amount of personal data it collects to help advertisers to discriminate, it's the same as slamming the door in someone's face," said Anna María Farías of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

REUTERS

Along with Facebook allowing Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, the social media company has created a space for property owners to discriminate against people of color, and the federal government had to step in.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has filed a new complaint against Facebook alleging it allows property owners and sellers to violate the Fair Housing Act.

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Accenture Commits $200 Million to Education, Training and Skills Initiatives over next Three Years to Equip People Around the World for Work in the Digital Age

Commitment includes company's Skills to Succeed goal to equip more than 3 million people with job and entrepreneurial skills by 2020.

REUTERS

Originally published by Accenture.

Supporting its vision to improve the way the world works and lives, Accenture (NYSE: ACN) is committing more than US$200 million over the next three years to help equip people around the world with job skills for the digital age.

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Google Segregates Women into Lower Level Jobs, Lawsuit Alleges

The tech giant "systematically" discriminates against its female employees and also keeps them from opportunities for promotions, according to a lawsuit.

REUTERS

A new lawsuit officially charges Google with discriminating against its female workers by "segregating" them into lower-paying positions.

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Diversity Management Is Neither Conservative Nor Liberal

The Google controversy is being cast as liberal versus conservative; it's neither.

REUTERS

In the recent Google controversy, Damore, the young man who wrote the 10-page memo that got him fired, has cast his firing as being liberal (Google) versus conservative (Damore).

It's neither. The media, especially the "conservative" media, is missing the point. Google exists to provide return on equity to its shareholders. Money doesn't care about "liberal" or "conservative." It does care about "disruptive." If the management team charts a course, arguing against it is disruptive. These days, if you put anti-work culture material on your Facebook page, you are disruptive at work because the people you work with will certainly share the news.

New entrants to the labor market are almost twice as diverse as retiring boomers. There is a 22 percentage point difference for women alone (more, if you include unemployment differences) — which is not surprising, as women labor participation rate went up 50 percent over the last 50 years, and more than half of four-year college degrees have been earned by women since the late 1980s.

So, whether you are designing products to be consumed by the workforce or people to employ, diversity management is a commonsense strategic necessity.

In the case of Google, its self-reported workforce demographics show yawning gaps for everyone but white and Asian men. Nobody can deny Google's business success — but recognizing that talent gaps are liabilities, Google, ignoring lessons learned by more progressive companies, charted its own course toward diversity management, which hit an iceberg in the past week.

In my opinion, the CEO badly fumbled. Their brand new chief diversity officer was thrust into the spotlight to respond — the CEO responded days later, fired Damore and canceled their diversity summit (which was a bad idea to begin with; they were not thought out enough to be ready).

Hopes, dreams and aspirations are wonderful, but if I were Google's CEO, I would be ready to answer a key question: Why aren't there more women at Google? Why haven't their self-reported numbers significantly improved? Why has Google been passive?

There is a problem. Although attaining almost 60 percent of four-year degrees, women shy away from engineering in college. Only 16 percent of computer science engineering degrees are earned by women.

However, just like there is a 20 percentage point difference between women in top management at Google versus the DiversityInc Top 10, some colleges are doing far better at attracting women to engineering. For example, at MIT, Women earn 51 percent of engineering degrees and 32 percent of computer engineering degrees (double for the national average).

Google has a $649 billion market cap. It can afford to fund massive scholarships at the best schools to attract the women it needs to gain an intellectual cultural foothold for women at its company — a foothold that would change the culture that enabled Damore to communicate as he did. Decisive leadership changes cultures.

I've seen this happen in real life at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Company. While decisively recovering from a class-action lawsuit that women brought to a successful decision, NPC CEO Andre Wyss disciplined management to the extent that he was succeeded by a woman, who had 50 percent women reporting to her (including scientific functions). It took him several years, but by the time he concluded his magnificent diversity management initiative, there were no more excuses in executive diversity council meetings. None. There was pride. And NPC was ranked number one on our Top 50 list. Twice.

Why should Google make an investment in diversity management?

As Damore pointed out in his essay, there are differences between men and women, but the differences themselves are instrumental to the future innovation necessary to keep ahead of technology, demographic and cultural change. 100 years ago, Detroit was Silicon Valley. People flocked there from all over. Detroit's population peaked in 1950 with 1.8 million people; currently it has 677,000 and the signs in the Detroit airport are bi-lingual, Chinese and English. The Big 3 were out-innovated. But they are recovering. General Motors (No. 42 on our Top 50) moved the cool-car Cadillac division headquarters to extremely diverse SoHo Manhattan.

Related links:

https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2005/11/art3full.pdf

https://www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cpsee_e16.htm

https://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_303.htm

https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/economy/reports/2012/07/12/11938/the-state-of-diversity-in-todays-workforce/

https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/immigration/news/2013/10/25/77924/the-role-of-people-of-color-in-the-future-workforce/

http://www.gallup.com/poll/181292/third-oldest-baby-boomers-working.aspx

https://www.dol.gov/dol/aboutdol/history/herman/reports/futurework/conference/trends/trendsI.htm

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

Alt-Right Targets Google Employees Who Disagree with Sexist Memo

Amid employees' fear of harassment, Google CEO Sundar Pichai cancelled the scheduled companywide meeting to address James Damores' sexist memo.

REUTERS

Google CEO Sundar Pichai cancelled a companywide town hall style meeting scheduled for Thursday amid employees' fear of harassment — primarily thanks to alt-right websites.

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Fired Google Engineer: Company 'Shamed Me'

James Damore, who said in an interview he feels "betrayed" by the tech giant, also filed a complaint against his former employer.

FACEBOOK

In his first interview with a mainstream media outlet, James Damore, the former Google engineer behind the widely controversial memo about women in tech and leadership, said the company "punished me and shamed me." He also announced his plans to sue the tech giant earlier this week.

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Google Engineer Wrote Controversial Memo After Attending Company Diversity Program

After attending one of Google's diversity programs James Damore said in an interview with a conservative YouTube channel, "There's just so much hypocrisy in the things they are saying."

SCREENGRAB VIA YOUTUBE

The Google engineer who penned a memo with misogynist ideas that cost him his job has spoken out about the situation.

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