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Fox News' Tucker Carlson: Latino Immigrants Made Town 'Volatile' for White People

"Before you start calling anyone bigoted, how would you feel if that happened in your neighborhood?" Carlson said.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson ran a segment on his show this week discussing a recent piece in National Geographic on how white people feel left behind because of demographic shifts in Hazleton, Pa., a former coal-mining town.


Carlson, who is becoming the network's faithful defender of President Donald Trump's anti-immigration policies, lamented the "bewildering" pace of demographic changes "without any real public debate on the subject."

He conveniently left out the part where the magazine states the town was "slipping into decline until a wave of Latinos arrived."

Carlson began, "In the year 2000, Hazleton's population was 2 percent Hispanic. Just 16 years later, Hazleton is majority Hispanic. That's a lot of change.

"People who grew up in Hazleton found out that they can't communicate with the people who now live there. And that's bewildering for people.

"That's happening all over the country. No nation, no society has ever changed this much this fast.

"Before you start calling anyone bigoted, consider and be honest, how would you feel if that happened in your neighborhood?" he asked his viewers.

"It doesn't matter how nice these immigrants are. They probably are nice; most immigrants are nice. That's not the point. This is more change than human beings are designed to digest.

"This pace of change makes societies volatile, really volatile, just as ours has become volatile."

According to a 2016 New York Times report, because Trump "has denigrated immigrants repeatedly, at times without distinguishing between legal and illegal immigration," residents opposed to the demographic change in Hazleton clung on to his rhetoric.

"Donald Trump's position on illegal immigration plays a big role in his support not only in Hazleton but in northeast Pennsylvania," said Lou Barletta, a Republican who represents the region in Congress.

Latinos continue to move to Hazleton from larger cities like New York and Paterson, N.J.

Jamie Longazel, now a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, grew up just outside Hazleton, told the Times that the "Hispanic ascendance emerged from seismic economic shifts."

"When the local coal mines began to close in the 1950s, Hazleton residents raised money to build an industrial park that attracted factories to the region," the Times reports. "When the factories began to leave in the 1990s, the city mobilized again.

"Local officials won state permission to create one of Pennsylvania's largest tax-free Keystone Opportunity Zones. A Cargill meat processing and distribution plant arrived in 2001. Other distribution businesses have followed, including an Amazon.com warehouse."

And, "many residents claim that city officials advertised for low-cost immigrant labor on billboards in New York or New Jersey," but Longazel said that claim hasn't been validated. He said the reality is "native-born folks" didn't want the low-paying jobs offered.

"The new jobs don't pay as much as the old jobs did, and the reality is that native-born folks were just not interested," Longazel said.

Who Is Carlson Trying to Influence with His Anti-Immigration Rant?

Not surprisingly, 60 percent of Fox News viewers describe themselves as conservative, compared with 23 percent who say they are moderate and 10 percent who are liberal. The average age of a Fox News viewer last year was 65 and they were predominately white males, according to Nielsen research.

But Carlson is also appealing to younger white, conservatives.

In 2017, for cable programs in the 18-49 demographic, "Tucker Carlson Tonight" earned 355,000 viewers, reports Deadline. It comes second to Sean Hannity's show on Fox, which tied Rachel Maddow's MSNBC program for the year's top spot in the younger demo — 417K viewers.

Carlson, who has been said to mainstream white nationalism, may be appealing to the ilk of Richard Spencer and others who carried Tiki torches at a rally on the University of Virginia campus last year chanting, "You will not replace us."

In January, Carlson interviewed Canadian pundit Mark Steyn, who defended white supremacists.

"The white supremacists are American citizens," Steyn said. "The illegal immigrants are people who shouldn't be here."

Asians Largest Immigrant Group by 2055

Carlson makes reference to "reckless immigration policies" alluding to the belief that undocumented immigrants, especially Spanish-speaking immigrants, are overtaking the country. But the origin of the increase in immigrant populations goes back decades.

As a result of Congress passing the Immigration and Nationality Act in 1965, immigrants and their descendants have fueled the U.S. population. The law replaced the national origins quota system with a seven-category preference system emphasizing family reunification and skilled immigrants, which increased immigration from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

According to the Pew Research Center, most immigrants (76 percent) are in the country legally, while a quarter are unauthorized. In 2015, 44 percent were naturalized U.S. citizens.

Carlson emphasized the increase of the Latino population around the country, but the increase in Asian immigrants is about the same. In 2015, 11.6 million immigrants living in the U.S. were from Mexico, accounting for 27 percent of all U.S. immigrants. However, by region of birth, immigrants from South and East Asia combined accounted for 27 percent of all immigrants, a share equal to that of Mexico.

Between 2007 and 2015, the number of Mexican immigrants decreased by more than 1 million. Following the Great Recession, immigration from Latin America slowed, particularly from Mexico.

"By race and ethnicity, more Asian immigrants than Hispanic immigrants have arrived in the U.S. each year since 2010," Pew reports. "Asians are projected to become the largest immigrant group in the U.S. by 2055, surpassing Hispanics."

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

Charges Dropped Against Black Boy Who Played With a Toy Gun

Zahiem Salahuddin was arrested and faced simple assault, reckless endangerment and possession of an "instrument of crime" charges just for using a toy.

Defender Association of Philadelphia

Zahiem Salahuddin, a 13-year-old 8th grade student, was playing with his friends on the basketball court in Grays Ferry, Pa., this past summer. Salahuddin had a plastic toy gun that shot an orange plastic ball. A white boy was hit with the plastic ball. It was unclear which child shot the ball that hit the other child.

Salahuddin rode his bike home later, but was stopped by men in a black pickup truck who told him he shot at a Philadelphia police officer's son. Police in marked cars then arrived and Salahuddin was arrested, charged, and spent three days in jail.

For an orange plastic ball from a $3.50 toy, he faced simple assault, reckless endangerment and possession of an "instrument of crime."

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner has informed the Defender Association of Philadelphia that his office will withdraw juvenile charges on Thursday, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

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On Twitter, President Trump threatened to engage the military to guard the southern border of the Unites States.

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Report on Racism in Philly Suburb School District Causes White Officials to Get Defensive

Instead of hiring a diversity and inclusion specialist to address diversity issues, they chose to hire mental health professionals and white-led university consultants.

Screenshot from Haverford School Board Video

After a report was released detailing racist incidents in the Haverford, Pa., school district and town, leadership in one of the most affluent regions in the country, with a predominantly white population, decided that diversity is not a priority.

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UPDATE: Man Found Guilty of a Lesser Charge for Shooting at Black Teen

Brennan Walker testified: "I turned back and I saw him aiming at me ... I was trying to run away faster and I heard a gunshot."

The jury at Oakland County Circuit Court in Michigan found Jeffrey Craig Ziegler, age 53, guilty of assault with intent to do great bodily harm and possession of a firearm in the commission of a felony.

They deliberated less than three hours on Friday after closing arguments, where the prosecutor, Kelly Collins, argued that Ziegler "was the danger," not the teen. Brennan Walker narrowly escaped fatal injury because Ziegler forgot to turn off the safety on his 12-gauge Mossberg shotgun. The video showed he was unable to immediately fire at first, and police confirmed the safety was initially on.

Ziegler's attorney, Robert Morad, argued his client was firing a warning shot in the air one time and never chased after Walker.

The original charge was assault with intent to murder, punishable by up to life in prison, but Ziegler was convicted on the lesser charge and faces up to 10 years in prison.

He showed no emotion as the verdict was read.

Lisa Wright, Walker's mother, cried as the verdict was read. She had accused Ziegler of taking actions that were racially motivated. Her friend Carin Poole said justice was served "in some way."

Related Story: White Man Who Shot at Lost Black Teen and Called Him 'Colored' Stands Trial

Poole also said the hope was for a more serious charge.

According to a study done by the Equal Justice Initiative:

White defendants were 25 percent more likely than black defendants to have their most serious initial charge dropped or reduced to a less severe charge; approximately 15 percent more likely than similar black defendants to be convicted of a misdemeanor instead. White defendants with no prior convictions were over 25 percent more likely than black defendants with no prior convictions to receive a charge reduction.

Ziegler testified that he thought Walker was an adult, at 6-feet, 2-inches tall, and that "instinct" made him grab his gun to protect his wife.

Walker testified: "I turned back and I saw him aiming at me... I was trying to run away faster and I heard a gunshot."

Morad said outside of court that the home security video could appear to show Ziegler was firing in Walker's direction, but said the shot goes away from where the teen was running.

Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said, "That's just completely unacceptable on every level. I don't know how you would justify it, but it certainly doesn't pass the muster," said Bouchard.

Judge Wendy Potts revoked Ziegler's bond and ordered him to jail pending sentencing Nov. 13.

Reader Question: When sentencing happens in a month, how much time in do you think Ziegler will be sentenced to?

One 'Pocahontas' is Real, The Other Isn't

Sen. Elizabeth Warren releases a DNA test as the Republican House Majority Leader's family member is revealed as taking government set-asides fraudulently.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and GOP House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy

In a rebuttal to President Trump's ridiculing of her as "fake Pocahontas," Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released a DNA test that shows "strong evidence" she has Native-American heritage. Meanwhile, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's family benefited from a U.S. program for minorities based on the doubtful claim his brother-in-law is Cherokee.

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Democrats in Midterm Jeopardy Over Poor Outreach to Latinos

Failure to directly address concerns leads to weak support. Races in Nevada, Arizona, Texas and Florida, states with growing Hispanic populations, are bungled.

REUTERS

Democrats are struggling to secure the Latino vote in the midterm elections because the party did not engage Latino voters strongly enough.

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White Man Who Shot at Lost Black Teen and Called Him 'Colored' Stands Trial

Shooter on trial might face life in prison, if convicted.

TWITTER

Jeffrey Zeigler, who is on trial for shooting at a lost Black teen in Rochester Hills, Mich., watched as his wife, Dana, broke down in tears in Oakland County Circuit Court on Tuesday, while testifying about the April 12 shooting, and watching a video of the incident.

Dana said she was frightened when she saw Brennan Walker, a 14-year-old Black teen, on her porch.

"What are you doing on my porch?" she recalled. "I saw a Black person standing at my door and I screamed at him, and I asked him what he was doing there."

Her report to police: "A Black male was trying to break into her house and her husband chased after him into the yard."

The video shows Zeigler aiming at the teen, despite the claims that he tripped and his gun fired.

Prosecutor Kelly Collins said that "being a bad shot does not negate one's intentions."

Walker, then age 14, had missed his bus to school that morning and came to the Zeigler's door for help. After his wife screamed, Zeigler fired a shotgun at the teen, but missed him.

Zeigler had referred to Walker, in an interview with a sheriff's deputy, as "that colored kid" at his front door. The defense initially claimed it was the interviewing officer who said "colored."

Zeigler also said he was "tired of being a victim."

His attorney, Rob Morad, has said that "race was not a factor in the shooting, but rather actions from passion instead of judgment," Morad told jurors. He said the couple had five previous break-ins and were on "high alert."

Walker's mother, Lisa Wright, who was also in tears in the courtroom watching the video of her son flee for his life, said that she believed the shooting was a hate crime and that she wanted to see the prosecution push this to the fullest extent.

In April, she said that she believed this was racially motivated. After watching a video near the time of the incident, she said: "You can hear the wife say, 'Why did these people choose my house?' Who are 'these people?' "

Walker testified that after he knocked on the front door, which is behind a screen door, Zeigler's wife accused him of trying to break in.

"I was scared," he testified. "I was trying to tell them that I was trying to get to high school, but they weren't listening."

Zeigler was arrested and released on $50,000 bond and ordered to wear a tracking device. He was charged with assault with intent to murder, which could lead to life in prison, Oakland County District Attorney Jessica R. Cooper said, along with use of a firearm in a felony.

Zeigler also has a conviction for firing a handgun at another motorist during a dispute in 2004.

Reader Question: Watching the video, would you say Zeigler is innocent or guilty of intent to murder?

​White Woman Calls 911 on a Black Man Babysitting White Kids: Video

A young girl had to tell the officer during questioning, "He's an after-school teacher and he's babysitting us."

FACEBOOK

A white woman in Georgia called the police on a Black man, Corey Lewis, as he babysat a 10-year-old white girl, and 6-year-old white boy. Their parents, who live in East Cobb, arranged for Lewis to babysit the kids weeks ago.

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