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Fox News' Tucker Carlson: Latino Immigrants Made Town 'Volatile' for White People

"Before you start calling anyone bigoted, how would you feel if that happened in your neighborhood?" Carlson said.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson ran a segment on his show this week discussing a recent piece in National Geographic on how white people feel left behind because of demographic shifts in Hazleton, Pa., a former coal-mining town.


Carlson, who is becoming the network's faithful defender of President Donald Trump's anti-immigration policies, lamented the "bewildering" pace of demographic changes "without any real public debate on the subject."

He conveniently left out the part where the magazine states the town was "slipping into decline until a wave of Latinos arrived."

Carlson began, "In the year 2000, Hazleton's population was 2 percent Hispanic. Just 16 years later, Hazleton is majority Hispanic. That's a lot of change.

"People who grew up in Hazleton found out that they can't communicate with the people who now live there. And that's bewildering for people.

"That's happening all over the country. No nation, no society has ever changed this much this fast.

"Before you start calling anyone bigoted, consider and be honest, how would you feel if that happened in your neighborhood?" he asked his viewers.

"It doesn't matter how nice these immigrants are. They probably are nice; most immigrants are nice. That's not the point. This is more change than human beings are designed to digest.

"This pace of change makes societies volatile, really volatile, just as ours has become volatile."

According to a 2016 New York Times report, because Trump "has denigrated immigrants repeatedly, at times without distinguishing between legal and illegal immigration," residents opposed to the demographic change in Hazleton clung on to his rhetoric.

"Donald Trump's position on illegal immigration plays a big role in his support not only in Hazleton but in northeast Pennsylvania," said Lou Barletta, a Republican who represents the region in Congress.

Latinos continue to move to Hazleton from larger cities like New York and Paterson, N.J.

Jamie Longazel, now a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, grew up just outside Hazleton, told the Times that the "Hispanic ascendance emerged from seismic economic shifts."

"When the local coal mines began to close in the 1950s, Hazleton residents raised money to build an industrial park that attracted factories to the region," the Times reports. "When the factories began to leave in the 1990s, the city mobilized again.

"Local officials won state permission to create one of Pennsylvania's largest tax-free Keystone Opportunity Zones. A Cargill meat processing and distribution plant arrived in 2001. Other distribution businesses have followed, including an Amazon.com warehouse."

And, "many residents claim that city officials advertised for low-cost immigrant labor on billboards in New York or New Jersey," but Longazel said that claim hasn't been validated. He said the reality is "native-born folks" didn't want the low-paying jobs offered.

"The new jobs don't pay as much as the old jobs did, and the reality is that native-born folks were just not interested," Longazel said.

Who Is Carlson Trying to Influence with His Anti-Immigration Rant?

Not surprisingly, 60 percent of Fox News viewers describe themselves as conservative, compared with 23 percent who say they are moderate and 10 percent who are liberal. The average age of a Fox News viewer last year was 65 and they were predominately white males, according to Nielsen research.

But Carlson is also appealing to younger white, conservatives.

In 2017, for cable programs in the 18-49 demographic, "Tucker Carlson Tonight" earned 355,000 viewers, reports Deadline. It comes second to Sean Hannity's show on Fox, which tied Rachel Maddow's MSNBC program for the year's top spot in the younger demo — 417K viewers.

Carlson, who has been said to mainstream white nationalism, may be appealing to the ilk of Richard Spencer and others who carried Tiki torches at a rally on the University of Virginia campus last year chanting, "You will not replace us."

In January, Carlson interviewed Canadian pundit Mark Steyn, who defended white supremacists.

"The white supremacists are American citizens," Steyn said. "The illegal immigrants are people who shouldn't be here."

Asians Largest Immigrant Group by 2055

Carlson makes reference to "reckless immigration policies" alluding to the belief that undocumented immigrants, especially Spanish-speaking immigrants, are overtaking the country. But the origin of the increase in immigrant populations goes back decades.

As a result of Congress passing the Immigration and Nationality Act in 1965, immigrants and their descendants have fueled the U.S. population. The law replaced the national origins quota system with a seven-category preference system emphasizing family reunification and skilled immigrants, which increased immigration from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

According to the Pew Research Center, most immigrants (76 percent) are in the country legally, while a quarter are unauthorized. In 2015, 44 percent were naturalized U.S. citizens.

Carlson emphasized the increase of the Latino population around the country, but the increase in Asian immigrants is about the same. In 2015, 11.6 million immigrants living in the U.S. were from Mexico, accounting for 27 percent of all U.S. immigrants. However, by region of birth, immigrants from South and East Asia combined accounted for 27 percent of all immigrants, a share equal to that of Mexico.

Between 2007 and 2015, the number of Mexican immigrants decreased by more than 1 million. Following the Great Recession, immigration from Latin America slowed, particularly from Mexico.

"By race and ethnicity, more Asian immigrants than Hispanic immigrants have arrived in the U.S. each year since 2010," Pew reports. "Asians are projected to become the largest immigrant group in the U.S. by 2055, surpassing Hispanics."

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

Police Investigate Teen's Threats to Lynch N*****s in Racist Snapchat Video

NAACP says: While the state has hate crime laws, they're not often enforced.

A white teen, social media identified as a student at Southington High School in Connecticut, made a racist video that included threats of lynching Black people and claims that he "hung 12 Black men from a tree just this night."

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John Kelly Owes Frederica Wilson an Apology Before He Leaves the White House

"I hope he will offer a long overdue apology to Congresswoman Frederica Wilson for lying about her in the press," tweeted Rep. Barbara Lee.

White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly will exit his post by the end of the year. During his tenure, Kelly has contributed to the administration's perpetual disrespect of Black women, including Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.). He made up a lie about her.

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Using Undocumented Immigrants for ​Labor is the Norm at Trump's Golf Club

"We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money," said a woman working at Trump National Golf Club.

As President Trump sends troops to the U.S.-Mexico border to "defend" (white) America against the caravans of Brown people and bar some from asylum in the U.S., the history of hiring undocumented workers at his properties in New Jersey and Florida continues to come to light.

Trump has a problem with undocumented immigrants seeking asylum, but not when they are hired to wash his clothes or make his bed.

Victorina Morales, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, reportedly crossed the border in 1999 and has worked at the at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J, since 2013, The New York Times reported Thursday.

According to a spokesperson for his business organization, she would be one of tens of thousands of people to be employed by Trump, and would be terminated if she was undocumented. Sandra Diaz, 46, from Costa Rica was another.

Both Morales and Diaz, during their stints, washed the Trump family's clothes in a special detergent, made beds and dusted.

"There are many people without papers," said Ms. Diaz, who said she witnessed several people being hired whom she knew to be undocumented.

Morales was initially pleased with her job because she was paid and tipped well, often times by Trump. But her sentiments changed when he ran for president.

"I'm tired of being humiliated and treated like a stupid person," she said in Spanish during a brief interview. "We're just immigrants who don't have papers."

During his campaign in 2016, when he referred to Mexicans as rapists and criminals, he promised to mandate E-Verify, a federal tool to verify employment eligibility, and requested $23 million in his 2019 budget proposal to expand the program for nationwide use. He also bragged when a new Trump hotel opened in Washington, "We didn't have one illegal immigrant on the job."

"The president has been half-serious about stopping illegal immigration by not taking away the jobs magnet," said Roy Beck, president of NumbersUSA, a group pushing to reduce immigration. Beck said Trump has "let us down in his promise to help American workers" because he hasn't "put his shoulder behind a mandatory E-Verify bill."

Trump signed a "Buy American, Hire American" executive order in 2017 restricting visas, but his Mar-a-Lago golf club also has a history of applying for H-2B visas for hundreds of immigrant workers. The H-2B visa is for "temporary non-agricultural workers."

Morales reports being driven to work by staff to hide the fact that she couldn't legally drive, and that after she presented fake papers for work, she was given another set of fake papers by the Trump Organization to keep her employed there.

Morales had a front row seat on the job to Trump meetings as she was cleaning his villa, even when potential cabinet members were interviewed and when he met with the White House chief of staff.

But that didn't come without experiencing verbal abuse from Trump's staff.

Her attorney Anibal Romero said in a statement Thursday that his clients were called racial epithets and threatened with deportation by a supervisor that ironically, "had employed them despite knowing their undocumented status and even provided them with forged documents."

"We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money," she told the NY Times. "We sweat it out to attend to his every need and have to put up with his humiliation."

Reader Question: Do we need any more proof that he's a liar about everything?

Oklahoma State Senator Says Slavery Was Challenged, So Legal Abortion Should Be, Too

Joseph Silk wants a bill that criminalizes abortion to challenge the Supreme Court decision because the Court once ruled "that slaves were private property and they were wrong."

State Sen. Joseph Silk (R-Broken Bow) is pushing his "Abolition of Abortion in Oklahoma Act," which calls on the state to ignore federal law on abortion. And he's using the argument that states can ignore the Supreme Court because "they were wrong about slavery."

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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.), the only Black Republican in the Senate, opposed President Trump's nomination of Thomas Farr to become a federal judge, on Thursday, ending his chances of confirmation. Trump's choice — an attorney who has supported voter suppression targeting Blacks — caused Scott to defy the leader of his party's wishes.

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Holocaust Scholar at Columbia Frightened by Swastikas Spray-Painted on Her Office

The anti-Semitism, on the rise since Trump was elected, continues.

Elizabeth Midlarsky, a Jewish professor who teaches and researches the Holocaust at Columbia Teachers College, experienced first-hand the resurgence of anti-Semitic crimes across the country since President Trump took office.

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Update: Former Police Chief Gets 3 Years in Prison for Framing Black Men

A Black man who was unjustly convicted because of Raimundo Atesiano's actions was deported back to Haiti.

UPDATE: Nov. 28, 2018

Raimundo Atesiano was sentenced to three years in prison for a conspiracy in his department to frame Black people. The former Biscayne Park police chief was allowed him to remain free for two weeks before surrendering to care for his mother, who is dying of leukemia, according to the Miami Herald.

"When I took the job, I was not prepared," Atesiano told a federal judge. "I made some very, very bad decisions."

ORIGINAL STORY

As racial disparities continue to plague the criminal justice system, a former police chief in Florida admitted to purposely sending Black men to prison. Former Biscayne Park Police Chief Raimundo Atesiano acknowledged at his plea hearing in Miami federal court that he told his cops in 2013 to frame three Black residents, one of which was a 16-year-old, for a series of unsolved home and vehicle burglaries in order get a 100 percent clearance on the department's property crimes record.

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Trevor Noah Sounds Off About Another Black Hero Killed By Police

"The Second Amendment was not made for Black folks," said Noah.

Jemel Roberson, a Black hero shot dead by police, was laid to rest last weekend as was Emantic Bradford Jr., an innocent Black 21-year-old male mistakenly identified as a mass shooter in an Alabama mall and also shot dead by police.

"How does this shit keep happening?" Trevor Noah, host of "The Daily Show," asked after discussing the incident.

"The cops are called into a situation. They see a Black person. And then immediately they shoot."

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