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EY Earns No. 1 Spot on 2017 DiversityInc Top 50 List

The firm also placed on nine specialty lists, ranking No. 1 for executive women, people with disabilities, mentoring and more.

DiversityInc on Tuesday revealed the 2017 Top 50 Companies for Diversity, awarding EY the number one spot on this year's list following an impressive performance since joining the Top 50 in 2001.


Prior to this year's competition, EY has been among the Top 10 for the past eight years — seven of those years in the Top 5. The company ranked third in 2016.

The Top 50 list, issued yearly since 2001, recognizes the nation's top companies for diversity and inclusion management. These companies excel in such areas as hiring, retaining and promoting women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, LGBT and veterans.

Rounding out the top five this year were last year's winner Kaiser Permanente at No. 2, AT&T at No. 3, PricewaterhouseCoopers at No. 4 and and Johnson & Johnson at No. 5.

In addition to its position on the Top 50, EY also landed on nine specialty lists, including No. 1 for Executive Women, People with Disabilities, Diversity Councils, Employee Resource Groups and Mentoring.

"EY is number one because they worked harder than anyone else," said DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti. "They have outstanding CEO engagement with Steve Howe, who has empowered his people to do their job, and they did it. And they take this very seriously, with metrics-based and cultural emphases."

Visconti said EY understands diversity and inclusion is critical to business and rooted in finding the best talent.

"EY produces no product other than the product of the human brain," he said. "For EY, it all boils down to doing a better job for their clients. They focus on scooping up the best talent, and once they have them, they do a superior job of keeping them. They focus on the whole package: recruitment, onboarding, talent development and retention. This is top-down, side to side."

U.S. Chairman and Americas Managing Partner of EY Steve Howe told the roughly 1,000 attendees gathered at Cipriani Wall Street for the Top 50 event that his firm invests in diversity and inclusion as a "business imperative."

"Over the last 11 years at the helm of EY … it's been very clear to me that being centered on people, culture and values is what it's all about," Howe said. "And as our world and our people became increasingly diverse, I came to realize that inclusiveness was not just a buzzword. This was actually a business imperative. Diversity and inclusion became the catalyst for our success at EY. We committed to being the best we could be at diversity and inclusion, and we put great emphasis on all of it."

Howe added that D&I is a strategic priority for his firm. "I remember clearly sitting around our boardroom table, during the financial crisis, and most things we had to cut back on. Diversity and inclusion — we doubled down. We consider our culture to be a competitive advantage."

DiversityInc's extensive annual survey yields an empirically driven ranking based on recruitment, talent development, senior leadership commitment and supplier diversity. This year's competition was improved by new survey questions, increased emphasis on fairness over chasing numbers and more sophisticated analysis from the company's data scientists.

"The 10 percent increase in companies participating in the survey from a year ago proves that accountable leaders at these companies view diversity and inclusion as a key business measure," said Carolynn Johnson, DiversityInc's COO.

To further confirm the impact of diversity and inclusion on the bottom line, CNBC reporter Bertha Coombs was on hand Tuesday to unveil this year's DiversityInc Top 50 stock index and its comparison to the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average.

"The companies that compete to earn a spot on the DiversityInc Top 50 – and the specialty lists — understand the importance of diverse workforces and management teams," Coombs said. "Research shows that these most diverse companies tend to actually perform better financially than the overall market. The Top 50 stock index, analyzed by CNBC's market services group, shows that longer term, three to five years, those companies on the DI Top 50 list of the most diverse companies outperform the overall market by a healthy margin."

While the one-year return of nearly 10.4 percent for the Top 50 index is slightly lower than the S&P's 11.8 percent and Dow's nearly 14 percent, it's certainly competitive, Coombs said, adding that the DI Index three-year return of nearly 28 percent outperforms the S&P 500's 26 percent and the Dow's 25 percent.

"When you look at the five-year long-term return, the DI Index totally outperforms," she explained. "79 percent, compared to S&P's 69 percent, and the Dow, only 57 percent.

"So when you look at the data, companies committed to diversity just grow and prosper more on every front. So if you don't focus on the buying power of Latinos or people of color, if you don't look at the fact that in the next 30 years or so, the majority of this country — more than 52 percent — will be people of color, then you are really missing the big picture. And you are really not focusing on the stars and focusing on the future," Coombs told business leaders in the audience. "You've got to develop young people who have a lot of different backgrounds. And in the long term, if you don't — simply put — you'll be less successful. Or worse, you'll be displaced by a competitor who knows better and who recognizes those gems and recognizes the need for different ideas, people from different backgrounds, who are going to help you reach the audience that you want to reach, that is much more diverse than ever in this country."

In addition to the Top 50 list, DiversityInc also revealed the following specialty lists:

  • Top 13 Companies for Diversity Councils (EY, No. 1)
  • Top 12 Companies for Employee Resource Groups (EY, No. 1)
  • Top 15 Companies for Mentoring (EY, No. 1)
  • Top 12 Companies for People with Disabilities (EY, No. 1)
  • Top 12 Companies for Recruitment (AT&T, No. 1)
  • Top 11 Companies for Supplier Diversity (Dell, No. 1)
  • Top 15 Companies for Veterans (Northrop Grumman, No. 1)
  • Top 12 Hospitals and Health Systems (Mount Sinai Health System, No. 1)
  • Top 11 Regional Companies (Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, No. 1)
  • Top 5 Utilities (Ameren Corporation, No. 1)
  • Top 9 Companies for Executive Women (EY, No. 1)
  • Top 11 for Progress (Southern Company, No. 1)
  • Top Companies for Global Diversity (not a ranked list)
  • Top Companies for LGBT Employees (not a ranked list)

The Top 50 announcement dinner in New York also featured speakers including Trevor Noah, host of Comedy Central's "The Daily Show"; Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr., founder and president of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition; and Dr. Johnnetta B. Cole, recently retired director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and past president of Spelman and Bennett colleges, who received DiversityInc's Lifetime Achievement Award.

To view the complete Top 50 and specialty lists, visit http://www.diversityinc.com/top50.

 

Kaiser Permanente: Loss and Renewal After AIDS: Why I Care

After losing his partner to AIDS, Rusty Myers, a palliative care social worker at Westside Medical Center in Hillsboro, Oregon, channeled his growing passion to care for patients facing terminal illness.

Originally Published by Kaiser Permanente.

For many of us, our journeys have taken circuitous routes that have eventually brought us to the work we do at Kaiser Permanente. My story began with significant loss and pain, which led to resiliency, and brought me to the work of hospice and palliative care.

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Kaiser Permanente Helps Oakland International Airport Passengers Reduce Stress and Maintain Good Mental Health

Just in time for the busy holiday travel season, transformation of OAK Terminal 2 security checkpoint encourages passengers to breathe, relax and thrive.

Originally Published by Kaiser Permanente.

Kaiser Permanente, the nation's largest integrated health care system, has introduced some practical and whimsical ways for passengers departing Terminal 2 at the Oakland International Airport to reduce the stress of air travel and encourage them to stay healthy this busy holiday travel season and beyond. This effort is part of nonprofit Kaiser Permanente's commitment to the total health of body, mind and spirit of the communities it serves.

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EY: Millennial Outlook Tempered Despite Strong U.S. Economy

EY releases results of second national poll exploring millennial views on economic future, including business, career prospects and student debt.

Originally Published by EY.

Ernst & Young LLP (EY) released the results of a survey of Millennials across the country, highlighting how the generation has defined itself a decade after the Great Recession. The results reveal that while Millennials are progressing more quickly than they were just a few years ago, they are still risk averse – delaying home ownership, marriage and new business endeavors – and uncertain about their economic future as they manage high levels of student debt and costs of living.

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Kaiser Permanente's Overall Quality of Medical Care Earns Highest Rating from the Office of Patient Advocate

Top score was also earned for providing quality behavioral and mental health care.

Originally Published by Kaiser Permanente.

Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California health plans are the only plans in the state to receive 5 stars — the highest possible rating — for overall quality of medical care in the annual Healthcare Quality Report Card from California's Office of the Patient Advocate.

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Anthony B. Coleman: Veterans Should Discover Their Passion and Allow it to Lead to a Profession

Coleman, talks with DiversityInc about his journey transitioning from life in the U.S. Navy to working for Kaiser Permanente as an Assistant Hospital Administrator.

Anthony B. Coleman, DHA, is the Assistant Hospital Administrator (Operations Support) for Kaiser Permanente, Fontana and Ontario Medical Centers.

He was born at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. At 17, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy serving aboard the USS Pioneer (MCM 9) and USS Ardent (MCM 12). After completing a full sea tour he was transferred to shore duty, and earned a Bachelor's degree in Workforce, Education and Development, as well as a Master of Health Administration. He later earned a commissioned as a Naval Officer serving in various roles overseas and afloat, including Chief Financial Officer at U.S. Naval Hospital Beaufort SC, Human Resources Director at U.S. Naval Hospital Yokosuka, Japan and Medical Operations Officer onboard the USS Harry S Truman (CVN 75) nuclear powered aircraft carrier.

Anthony retired in 2016 with 20 years of honorable service and holds a Doctor of Health Administration Degree and currently serves as the Assistant Administrator (Operations Support) for Kaiser Permanente Fontana and Ontario Medical Centers.

DI: What was the initial transition like going from the armed services to a civilian career?

My initial thoughts on transition brought unnecessary anxiety. However, when I learned that my preceptor was a retired Air Force Colonel, it helped put me at ease about the transition. On my first day at Kaiser Permanente, the staff and physicians welcomed me and ensured that I had the support I needed to make a successful transition.

DI: What are some skills or habits you developed while serving in the military that have helped you in your current role?

Two things stick out in my mind as important.

The first is transitioning mindset from duty to desire. I joined the navy at 17, and during the first 3-5 years of my military career I didn't realize I was part of something bigger than myself so I competed tasks out of obligation (duty). After completing my first full sea tour, I realized how my efforts contributed to the overall mission of the U.S. Navy and the duties I carried out started to come from a desire to do so. This realization helped shape my leadership style and how I groomed young sailors early on in their enlistments. I wanted them to realize their very important part in the overall U.S. Navy mission and motivate them to bring their "A" game every day.

This has helped in my current role overseeing nine non-clinical departments (Housekeeping, Food and Nutrition, Engineering, Construction, Parking, Safety, Property Management, Telecommunications, Security and Supply Chain Management) where the majority of the employees I oversee are entry-level and can feel disconnected to health care because they are not physicians or nurses. However, I stress to them as often as possible that whether their job is to nourish the patient, clean and disinfect a patient room, make sure life-saving equipment is in working order, or any other of the hundreds of non-clinical functions they perform day in and day out, they too are vital to a patient's health and healing.

The second is attention to detail. Most times, my staff are the first and/or last interaction our members have with Kaiser Permanente. It is crucial for them to pay attention to every detail about the patient they encounter because each and every detail about the patient, large or small can help us do a better job in serving them. Sometimes, it may be as simple as a smile or word of encouragement that could make all the difference in the patient experience.

DI: What career advice can you offer to veterans or current military folks who are looking to pivot, and what types of jobs should they be looking for?

Stay current in world health affairs, as well as the political climate in the US. Now more than ever, politics are shaping our approach to health care and vice versa. Veterans and current military members should make sure they have an idea of where civilian health care is, as well as where it's going in the future, so they can demonstrate their value to potential health care employers.

Devote time to discovering their passion and allow it to lead them to a profession. So often, when military members plan to transition to civilian life, they tend to focus on their ability to continue providing for their families beyond military service. This can cause us to accept positions for the sake of securing post military employment, or accept positions that are not aligned with our core beliefs, or passion.

DI: Did you always have an idea of the type of career you wanted to pursue after the military?

Yes. As a matter of fact, I began planning my exit from the military in 2005 when I discovered my passion for eliminating health disparities however, because I was a single father of a 5 year old girl, my mom convinced me to complete a full career first.

In 2004, the Navy sent me to graduate school to learn how to be a health administrator. During the summer of 2005, I interned at Wallace Thomson Hospital in rural Union County, South Carolina. While there I met a kitchen worker who impressed me with her skill in preparing meals for all of the sick patients at the hospital, specific to their individual needs. Her name was Pee Wee and even though she never finished high school, and worked a second job to make ends meet she somehow found a way to show compassion for each patient while contributing to the healing environment.

After the rotation was complete, I went back to finish graduate school and learned that Pee Wee died of a stroke. She was 52. Her death really affected me and a began to look at how a person in America could die so young of a preventable health issue. That's when I learned about health disparities and discovered my passion for eliminating them. I understand that I may not be able to complete this task in my lifetime however, I am completely comfortable with making it my life's work at Kaiser Permanente.

Anthony B. Coleman: Veterans Should Discover Their Passion and Allow it to Lead to a Profession

Coleman, talks with DiversityInc about his journey transitioning from life in the U.S. Navy to working for Kaiser Permanente as an Assistant Hospital Administrator.

Anthony B. Coleman, DHA, is the Assistant Hospital Administrator (Operations Support) for Kaiser Permanente, Fontana and Ontario Medical Centers.

He was born at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. At 17, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy serving aboard the USS Pioneer (MCM 9) and USS Ardent (MCM 12). After completing a full sea tour he was transferred to shore duty, and earned a Bachelor's degree in Workforce, Education and Development, as well as a Master of Health Administration.

He later earned a commissioned as a Naval Officer serving in various roles overseas and afloat, including Chief Financial Officer at U.S. Naval Hospital Beaufort SC, Human Resources Director at U.S. Naval Hospital Yokosuka, Japan and Medical Operations Officer onboard the USS Harry S Truman (CVN 75) nuclear powered aircraft carrier.

Anthony retired in 2016 with 20 years of honorable service and holds a Doctor of Health Administration Degree and currently serves as the Assistant Administrator (Operations Support) for Kaiser Permanente Fontana and Ontario Medical Centers.

DI: What was the initial transition like going from the armed services to a civilian career?

My initial thoughts on transition brought unnecessary anxiety. However, when I learned that my preceptor was a retired Air Force Colonel, it helped put me at ease about the transition. On my first day at Kaiser Permanente, the staff and physicians welcomed me and ensured that I had the support I needed to make a successful transition.

DI: What are some skills or habits you developed while serving in the military that have helped you in your current role?

Two things stick out in my mind as important.

The first is transitioning mindset from duty to desire. I joined the navy at 17, and during the first 3-5 years of my military career I didn't realize I was part of something bigger than myself so I competed tasks out of obligation (duty). After completing my first full sea tour, I realized how my efforts contributed to the overall mission of the U.S. Navy and the duties I carried out started to come from a desire to do so. This realization helped shape my leadership style and how I groomed young sailors early on in their enlistments. I wanted them to realize their very important part in the overall U.S. Navy mission and motivate them to bring their "A" game every day.

This has helped in my current role overseeing nine non-clinical departments (Housekeeping, Food and Nutrition, Engineering, Construction, Parking, Safety, Property Management, Telecommunications, Security and Supply Chain Management) where the majority of the employees I oversee are entry-level and can feel disconnected to health care because they are not physicians or nurses. However, I stress to them as often as possible that whether their job is to nourish the patient, clean and disinfect a patient room, make sure life-saving equipment is in working order, or any other of the hundreds of non-clinical functions they perform day in and day out, they too are vital to a patient's health and healing.

The second is attention to detail. Most times, my staff are the first and/or last interaction our members have with Kaiser Permanente. It is crucial for them to pay attention to every detail about the patient they encounter because each and every detail about the patient, large or small can help us do a better job in serving them. Sometimes, it may be as simple as a smile or word of encouragement that could make all the difference in the patient experience.

DI: What career advice can you offer to veterans or current military folks who are looking to pivot, and what types of jobs should they be looking for?

Stay current in world health affairs, as well as the political climate in the US. Now more than ever, politics are shaping our approach to health care and vice versa. Veterans and current military members should make sure they have an idea of where civilian health care is, as well as where it's going in the future, so they can demonstrate their value to potential health care employers.

Devote time to discovering their passion and allow it to lead them to a profession. So often, when military members plan to transition to civilian life, they tend to focus on their ability to continue providing for their families beyond military service. This can cause us to accept positions for the sake of securing post military employment, or accept positions that are not aligned with our core beliefs, or passion.

DI: Did you always have an idea of the type of career you wanted to pursue after the military?

Yes. As a matter of fact, I began planning my exit from the military in 2005 when I discovered my passion for eliminating health disparities however, because I was a single father of a 5 year old girl, my mom convinced me to complete a full career first.

In 2004, the Navy sent me to graduate school to learn how to be a health administrator. During the summer of 2005, I interned at Wallace Thomson Hospital in rural Union County, South Carolina. While there I met a kitchen worker who impressed me with her skill in preparing meals for all of the sick patients at the hospital, specific to their individual needs. Her name was Pee Wee and even though she never finished high school, and worked a second job to make ends meet she somehow found a way to show compassion for each patient while contributing to the healing environment.

After the rotation was complete, I went back to finish graduate school and learned that Pee Wee died of a stroke. She was 52. Her death really affected me and a began to look at how a person in America could die so young of a preventable health issue. That's when I learned about health disparities and discovered my passion for eliminating them. I understand that I may not be able to complete this task in my lifetime however, I am completely comfortable with making it my life's work at Kaiser Permanente.

Strong Values Drive Growth for Family Business Amid Disruption Fears, Finds PwC Global Survey

53% of businesses reporting double-digit growth have clear, written articulation of values.

Originally Published by PwC.

Family businesses should seek to maximise the competitive advantage that comes from their strong values-led culture, according to the Global Family Business Survey 2018 released today by PwC.

This year's survey saw family business leaders globally reporting robust health, with levels of growth at their highest level since 2007. Revenues are expected to continue growing for the vast majority of businesses (84%), with 16% saying it will be "quick" and "aggressive".

Regionally businesses in the Middle East and Africa were the most optimistic, with 28% expecting aggressive growth. They are followed by those in Asia Pacific (24%), Eastern Europe (17%), North America (16%), Central/South America (12%) and Western Europe (11%).

First-generation family businesses clearly outperform those run by subsequent generations in their ability to achieve double-digit growth, highlighting the need to balance business model continuity with an appetite for disruption.

The top three challenges cited by family businesses are innovation (66%), accessing the right skills and capabilities (60%) and digitalisation (44%). Indeed, 80% see digitalisation, innovation and technology ranked together as a significant challenge.

Most strikingly, the 2018 edition of the survey demonstrates a link between putting values at the heart of strategic planning and strong growth prospects. While 75% of family businesses believe their stronger culture and values gives them an advantage over non-family businesses, less than half (49%) of respondents have those values articulated in written form.

Among those family businesses reporting double-digit annual growth, 53% were able to point towards a codified set of values. This reflects the increasing emphasis needed on integrating business ownership strategies and family business growth strategies.

Peter Englisch, Global Leader for Family Business at PwC and report co-author says, "The message is clear: adopting an active stance towards company values generates practices that pay off in real terms. A commitment to a clearly defined set of values can act as an 'inner compass' for a family business as it navigates the challenges of technological and competitive disruption.

"What this survey clearly indicates, however, is that family business values are not simply the same as family values," Englisch says. "Business values should be clearly defined and articulated, but also strongly embedded in the business culture and the day-to-day decision-making regularly reviewed."

The PwC Family Business Survey also contains insights into how the pace of technology change and generational differences are informing family businesses' approach to legacy and succession planning.

  • Concern about the threat from digital disruption - ranging from new competition, to security vulnerability, and understanding of the threat - is higher than average (30%) amongst media, entertainment (65%), retail (53%) and financial services (52%) sectors.
  • Over a quarter (26%) of large organisations (with $100m+ revenues) identify AI/Robotics as a concern over the next two years, significantly higher than those with $20m revenues or less (16%).
  • 69% of respondents say they expected or encouraged the next generation of future leaders - including family members - to gain experience and develop skills outside of the family business to ensure they keep pace with innovation.

Peter Englisch says, "With over 350,000 family and private businesses set to change hands in the next years as owners retire, there is understandable concern about continuity planning. The next generation will be increasingly facing a different landscape in terms of the impact of technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics, as well as cybersecurity risks," he says.

"Yet our research again highlights the benefits of a values-led approach that can focus a family business on the continuity planning they need to do, and how that approach can help attract and equip the next generation with the skills needed to thrive in a digital age."

Despite family businesses' confidence and growth potential, the report cautions that the growth expectation is not always achieved. David Wills, Global Leader for Entrepreneurial and Private Business at PwC comments:

"Whilst the aspiration is strong, focusing on strategic planning remains a blind spot for too many family businesses. 21% report having no strategic plan at all, 30% have a plan in mind, but it is not far advanced. However, of the 49% that have formal mid-term plans, 42% of them were experiencing double digit growth. This demonstrates the strong correlation between strategic planning and performance excellence and builds up the habits that, over time, create a distinctive legacy."

"The speed of change in business is far greater than ever before. Just because you are growing now does not mean it will continue. Now, more than ever, capitalising on the inherent advantages of family business ownership requires business owning families to bring two core components together - the ownership strategy and the business strategy."

pwc

EY Explores Belonging in the Workplace, with New Belonging Barometer Study

Research uncovers that workers prefer check-ins and personal connections over facetime with senior leadership.

Originally Published by EY.

While today's social climate has been associated with controversy and disagreements, it also seems to be banding people together in a more positive way – surprisingly at work. Regardless of background, gender, sexual orientation or race, individuals are coming together in search of a sense of community and belonging, with many expecting and finding it within the workplace. In fact, in the context of work, research shows that when people feel like they belong, they are more productive, motivated and engaged as well as 3.5 times more likely to contribute to their full, innovative potential.

The new EY "Belonging Barometer" study uncovers how more than 1,000 employed adult Americans define belonging, what makes them feel like they belong at work and what makes them feel excluded in the workplace.

Key finding one: Diversity and Belonging are Workplace Expectations

Nearly half of American workers believe that diversity is best represented at work and over a third feel the greatest sense of belonging at work.

  • Forty-five percent of respondents believe that diversity is best represented at their place of work
  • Second only to home (62 percent), one third (34 percent) of respondents feel the greatest sense of belonging at work, ahead of their physical neighborhood (19 percent) and place of worship (17 percent)
  • When asked in what ways do you feel like you belong at work:
    • More than half (56 percent) of respondents feel they belong most at work when they feel trusted and respected, with baby boomers feeling this way the most at 63 percent, compared to Gen X at 56 percent and millennials at 53 percent
    • Thirty-nine percent of respondents feel they belong most at work when they have the ability to speak freely and voice their opinion
    • One third (34 percent) feel they belong most at work when their unique contributions are valued, with White respondents agreeing the most at 36 percent, followed by Black respondents at 31 percent and Hispanic respondents at 27 percent

Key finding two: Regular Check-ins Prevent Workers from Checking Out
Thirty-nine percent of respondents say that when colleagues check in with them about how they are doing both personally and professionally, they feel the greatest sense of belonging at work.

  • 44 percent of women and 33 percent of men agree
  • This response was most popular across all generations, with 35 percent of millennials, 40 percent of Gen X and 45 percent of baby boomers agreeing
  • Across all generations, the "check-in" took priority over actions such as public recognition (23 percent), being invited to out of office events (20 percent), being asked to join a meeting with senior leaders (14 percent) and being included on emails with senior leaders (9 percent)

Key finding three: Is Exclusion a Form of Bullying? Women Seem to Think So
The majority of women (61 percent) believe that exclusion is a form of bullying in the workplace, the majority of men (53 percent) believe it is not.

  • More than half (54 percent) of all respondents believe that exclusion is a form of bullying at work, 46 percent do not
  • 68 percent of the LGBTQ community believe that exclusion is a form of bullying
  • Fifty seven percent of Latino respondents believe that exclusion is a form of bullying, compared to 53 percent of White respondents and half (50 percent) of Black respondents
  • Generationally, nearly half of millennials (48 percent) feel the strongest that exclusion is nota form of bullying, compared to 46 percent of Gen X and 44 percent of baby boomers

Key finding four: The Emotional Barometer: Social Exclusion Makes People Feel Physically Ignored, Stressed, Sad and Even Angry
When social exclusion happens at work, people feel physically and emotionally isolated. More than 40 percent of respondents across generations and genders feel physically alone, or in other words, ignored. Others also experience feelings of stress (26 percent of males) and sadness (28 percent of women).

  • Generationally:
    • Millennials are most likely to feel ignored (38 percent), stressed (30 percent) and lonely (24 percent)
    • Gen X are most likely to feel ignored (41 percent), stressed (27 percent) and sad (26 percent)
    • Baby boomers are most likely to feel ignored (45 percent), angry (26 percent), stressed (21 percent) and sad (21 percent)
ey