Court Upholds Race in College Admissions

In a case returned by the Supreme Court, a Texas court has again ruled that race can be used as a consideration in college admissions.

By Chris Hoenig


After the U.S. Supreme Court sent the case back for further scrutiny, a federal appeals court in Texas has again upheld the use of race as a consideration in college admissions.

Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas at Austin after her admissions application was rejected in 2008, alleging that she was discriminated against because she's white. Her anti-Affirmative Action lawsuit made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit ruled in favor of the university. The Supreme Court, in a 7-1 ruling, said that race was still an applicable factor in admissions, but only if used in a narrow way.

"The reviewing court must ultimately be satisfied that no workable race-neutral alternatives would produce the educational benefits of diversity," Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the Supreme Court decision, which ordered Fisher's case back to the appeals court for reconsideration.

But the appeals-court justices said legal precedent set by the U.S. Supreme Court and the narrow use of race made UT's admissions criteria legal. "We are persuaded that to deny UT Austin its limited use of race in its search for holistic diversity would hobble the richness of the educational experience in contradiction of the plain teachings of Bakke and Grutter," Judge Patrick E. Higginbotham wrote in the majority opinion. "UT Austin has demonstrated a permissible goal of achieving the educational benefits of diversity within that university's distinct mission, not seeking a percentage of minority students that reaches some arbitrary size."

The university only uses race as a narrow criteria for admission because of the state's "Top Ten Percent Plan," which guarantees admission to state colleges for students who finish in the top 10 percent of their high-school class. Because Texas schools are largely segregated, the plan creates a diverse pool of guaranteed-admission students.

"While the Top Ten Percent Plan boosts minority enrollment by skimming from the tops of Texas high schools, it does so against this backdrop of increasing resegregation in Texas public schools, where over half of Hispanic students and 40 percent of black students attend a school with 90 percent–100 percent minority enrollment," the judges wrote.

The decision was welcomed by the University of Texas' administration.

"This ruling ensures that our campus, our state and the entire nation will benefit from the exchange of ideas and thoughts that happens when students who are diverse in all regards come together in the classroom, at campus events and in all aspects of campus life," President William C. Powers Jr. said.

Fisher, who has since graduated from Louisiana State University, said she will again appeal.

After a Typhoon of Publicity, Harvey Weinstein Charged with Rape

Allowed to turn himself in with pre-arranged bail already taken care of.

REUTERS

There was one more red carpet for Harvey to walk down. At 7:30 this morning, the alleged rapist walked into a Lower Manhattan police station surrounded by cameras flashing and reporters shouting his name.

Read More Show Less

Man Who Threatens to Sic ICE on Spanish-Speaking People Identified

Aaron Schlossberg is a New York-based attorney, and it turns out he has a lot of problems and they're all well documented.

The man caught on video lashing out at people for speaking Spanish has been identified as attorney Aaron Schlossberg. Twitter users made the identification, and it is being widely reported that he is the man.

The good news is that a GoFundMe account has been set up to send a Mariachi band to Schlossberg's Manhattan office. According to the fundraiser, "Any leftover money will be used to send a delicious Taco Truck lunch to the staff and a copy of all federal and state statute mentioning undocumented immigrants do not qualify for welfare."

Read More Show Less

'This is America' Video at 74 Million Views in Six Days, up 8 Million Since Yesterday Afternoon

Childish Gambino's insightful, intelligent and powerful observation of our culture inspires layered analysis.

Race, gun violence and U.S. culture are explored in recording artist Childish Gambino's "This is America" music video, which has gone viral. The video has garnered more than 74 million views on YouTube since it was released on Saturday and the buzz continues to grow.

Read More Show Less

White Yale Student Calls Police on Black Student for Napping in Dorm

A Black graduate student was harassed for falling asleep while studying.

Lolade Siyonbola/ FACEBOOK

Yale University claims it is committed to "maintaining an inclusive community of scholars." However, there's a glaring error in its practices when a white graduate student is either ill prepared or unwilling to live in a diverse and inclusive environment and continues to call the authorities on Black students.

Read More Show Less

Reason 1,000 Why Ben Carson Gets a Side Eye — HUD Is Being Sued by Civil Rights Groups

Carson is under fire for sidelining a housing regulation rule that discourages racial segregation.

President Donald Trump appointed Ben Carson secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) without any prior experience except that Carson "grew up in an inner city." Now Carson is leaving the door wide open for housing discrimination.

Read More Show Less

Graduating While Black: Students Manhandled on Stage at University of Florida Commencement Ceremony

"It's a situation where time and time again the university has made Black bodies feel unsafe," said graduate Oliver Telusma.

TWITTER

During the University of Florida's (UF) commencement ceremony, a white university graduation marshal decided to stop Black students from celebrating their diplomas with "strolling." He physically forced them off stage. At the pinnacle of their college careers, Black graduates were reminded that racism exists at the university.

Read More Show Less