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Comcast NBCUniversal, Military Agencies Provide Service Members Streaming Coverage of Olympic Games

This benefit is being provided at no cost to those who are currently serving in the U.S. military or retired military members.

PRESS RELEASE


The Army & Air Force Exchange Service announced that for the first time U.S. service members worldwide will be able to watch NBC Olympics' streaming coverage of the 2016 Rio Olympics from their desktop and personal devices. This benefit is being provided at no cost to those who are currently serving in the U.S. military or retired military members by Comcast NBCUniversal in partnership with the Exchange and U.S. cable, satellite and telco providers.

NBC Olympics will stream 4,500 hours of coverage, including live streaming all competition, as 10,500 athletes from 206 countries compete in 35 sports through Aug. 21.

"We're excited to partner with Comcast NBCUniversal to deliver the Olympics to service members and their families, wherever they are called to serve," said Tom Shull, Director/CEO of the Exchange. "Go USA!"

"Few events unify the world like the Olympic Games, and it is only fitting that we make them accessible for those who chose to serve our country," said Carol Eggert, Brigadier General (Retired), and Vice President of Military and Veteran Affairs at Comcast. "We think it is extremely important to support our employees who are veterans or members of the National Guard and Reserve and the military community as a whole. We are thankful to the Army & Air Force Exchange Service for working with us to deliver the excitement of the Olympics to the military community, no matter where they are located."

Service members will access NBC Olympics' digital coverage from their computers or personal devices by visiting NBCOlympics.com or the NBC Sports app and choosing the Exchange as their service provider.

Due to content rights restrictions, an active shopmyexchange.com account will be required to verify eligibility. Content rights restrictions will also apply to some OCONUS locations.

When Comcast NBCUniversal offered the service, a collaborative team including the Defense Media Activity, Defense Information Systems Agency, the Exchange and DHI Telecom (an Exchange Internet, mobile and IPTV provider) swung into action to develop the technical solution required.

Additional information will be available on shopmyexchange.com. To see a day-by-day list highlighting events to watch, go to NBCOlympics.com.

In addition to the streaming content, note that the American Forces Network (AFN) will also offer extensive NBC Olympics' broadcast and cable coverage on its television services for the overseas American military communities around the world.

"Once again we are extremely appreciative of the International Olympic Committee, its broadcast partners around the world, and to NBC Olympics for their excellent and extensive coverage of the 2016 Olympic Games being made available to America's military communities around the world," said Larry Marotta, Director, Television, American Forces Network.

To find out more about the Army & Air Force Exchange Service's history and mission or to view recent press releases, visit its website: http://www.aafes.com/about-exchange/public-affairs/press-releases.htm.

Anthony B. Coleman: Veterans Should Discover Their Passion and Allow it to Lead to a Profession

Coleman, talks with DiversityInc about his journey transitioning from life in the U.S. Navy to working for Kaiser Permanente as an Assistant Hospital Administrator.

Anthony B. Coleman, DHA, is the Assistant Hospital Administrator (Operations Support) for Kaiser Permanente, Fontana and Ontario Medical Centers.

He was born at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. At 17, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy serving aboard the USS Pioneer (MCM 9) and USS Ardent (MCM 12). After completing a full sea tour he was transferred to shore duty, and earned a Bachelor's degree in Workforce, Education and Development, as well as a Master of Health Administration. He later earned a commissioned as a Naval Officer serving in various roles overseas and afloat, including Chief Financial Officer at U.S. Naval Hospital Beaufort SC, Human Resources Director at U.S. Naval Hospital Yokosuka, Japan and Medical Operations Officer onboard the USS Harry S Truman (CVN 75) nuclear powered aircraft carrier.

Anthony retired in 2016 with 20 years of honorable service and holds a Doctor of Health Administration Degree and currently serves as the Assistant Administrator (Operations Support) for Kaiser Permanente Fontana and Ontario Medical Centers.

DI: What was the initial transition like going from the armed services to a civilian career?

My initial thoughts on transition brought unnecessary anxiety. However, when I learned that my preceptor was a retired Air Force Colonel, it helped put me at ease about the transition. On my first day at Kaiser Permanente, the staff and physicians welcomed me and ensured that I had the support I needed to make a successful transition.

DI: What are some skills or habits you developed while serving in the military that have helped you in your current role?

Two things stick out in my mind as important.

The first is transitioning mindset from duty to desire. I joined the navy at 17, and during the first 3-5 years of my military career I didn't realize I was part of something bigger than myself so I competed tasks out of obligation (duty). After completing my first full sea tour, I realized how my efforts contributed to the overall mission of the U.S. Navy and the duties I carried out started to come from a desire to do so. This realization helped shape my leadership style and how I groomed young sailors early on in their enlistments. I wanted them to realize their very important part in the overall U.S. Navy mission and motivate them to bring their "A" game every day.

This has helped in my current role overseeing nine non-clinical departments (Housekeeping, Food and Nutrition, Engineering, Construction, Parking, Safety, Property Management, Telecommunications, Security and Supply Chain Management) where the majority of the employees I oversee are entry-level and can feel disconnected to health care because they are not physicians or nurses. However, I stress to them as often as possible that whether their job is to nourish the patient, clean and disinfect a patient room, make sure life-saving equipment is in working order, or any other of the hundreds of non-clinical functions they perform day in and day out, they too are vital to a patient's health and healing.

The second is attention to detail. Most times, my staff are the first and/or last interaction our members have with Kaiser Permanente. It is crucial for them to pay attention to every detail about the patient they encounter because each and every detail about the patient, large or small can help us do a better job in serving them. Sometimes, it may be as simple as a smile or word of encouragement that could make all the difference in the patient experience.

DI: What career advice can you offer to veterans or current military folks who are looking to pivot, and what types of jobs should they be looking for?

Stay current in world health affairs, as well as the political climate in the US. Now more than ever, politics are shaping our approach to health care and vice versa. Veterans and current military members should make sure they have an idea of where civilian health care is, as well as where it's going in the future, so they can demonstrate their value to potential health care employers.

Devote time to discovering their passion and allow it to lead them to a profession. So often, when military members plan to transition to civilian life, they tend to focus on their ability to continue providing for their families beyond military service. This can cause us to accept positions for the sake of securing post military employment, or accept positions that are not aligned with our core beliefs, or passion.

DI: Did you always have an idea of the type of career you wanted to pursue after the military?

Yes. As a matter of fact, I began planning my exit from the military in 2005 when I discovered my passion for eliminating health disparities however, because I was a single father of a 5 year old girl, my mom convinced me to complete a full career first.

In 2004, the Navy sent me to graduate school to learn how to be a health administrator. During the summer of 2005, I interned at Wallace Thomson Hospital in rural Union County, South Carolina. While there I met a kitchen worker who impressed me with her skill in preparing meals for all of the sick patients at the hospital, specific to their individual needs. Her name was Pee Wee and even though she never finished high school, and worked a second job to make ends meet she somehow found a way to show compassion for each patient while contributing to the healing environment.

After the rotation was complete, I went back to finish graduate school and learned that Pee Wee died of a stroke. She was 52. Her death really affected me and a began to look at how a person in America could die so young of a preventable health issue. That's when I learned about health disparities and discovered my passion for eliminating them. I understand that I may not be able to complete this task in my lifetime however, I am completely comfortable with making it my life's work at Kaiser Permanente.

Trump Cancels Visit to WWI Cemetery Because of Rain

"It's incredible that a president would travel to France for this significant anniversary — and then remain in his hotel room watching TV," David Frum said on Twitter.

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery dedicated to the U.S. soldiers killed in the Belleau Wood battle during World War I / YOUTUBE

Light, steady rain resulted in President Trump cancelling plans to attend a commemoration in France on Saturday to honor U.S. soldiers killed during World War I.

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Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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A Female Veteran is Knocking Down Political Doors

This Air Force veteran's campaign, "Doors," has gained over 4 million views on social media.

SCREENGRAB VIA YOUTUBE

A female Air Force veteran with 4 million ad views on her side is not only opening doors for others, but is actively trying to bulldoze them down in the state of Texas by running up against Rep. John Carter (R-Texas).

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Here’s How Trump and Obama Honored Memorial Day

Veterans group calls Trump's tweet "the most inappropriate" Memorial Day remarks from a president.

President Donald “Cadet Bone Spurs" Trump and his predecessor sent very different messages on Twitter in light of Memorial Day.

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