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Calling All Girls: Science Needs You

Abbott's women leaders urge students to envision themselves as scientists and engineers.

Here's a pitch for girls everywhere: Want to create life-changing tech? Set your sights on Abbott (No. 10 on the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies list).


It takes commitment at an early age to build successful careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Women make up just 15-25 percent of STEM jobs today, and closing that gap will mean flattening the 'Belle Curve' by getting girls excited about these fields right out of the gate.

"When women are underrepresented in any field, the world misses out on their brain power to collaborate and solve the biggest problems," said Corlis Murray, Abbott's top engineer. On April 7, she shared her story at the country's largest STEM festival in Washington, D.C.

Murray's own journey into engineering's upper echelon began when she was plucked from her high school fast food job in Dallas, Texas, to become an engineering intern at IBM. Her message to girls and minorities: If you want to create the devices, medicines and products that help everyone live better, you can. Raise your hand, try things that scare you – be avidly curious.

Engineers are the second largest STEM occupation, but about 1 out of every 7 engineers is female, and far fewer of those women are African-American like Murray. Changing those numbers takes encouragement from others along with determination, but just 10 percent of girls say their parents urge them to think about becoming engineers.

"I had the fortune of having a terrific mentor who believed in me, and I came to believe I could become an engineer," Murray says. Murray also participated in the #ILookLikeAnEngineer social media campaign aimed at defusing the notion that women can't excel in these positions. "You are all capable, and smart – anyone can 'look' like an engineer."

Abbott neuroscientist Beth McQuiston, who joined Corlis on stage at the festival, credits her success in science to being curious about everything; she became a dietician, then studied to be a doctor before becoming fascinated by the study of the brain.

"The biggest obstacle women face to get into this field is that they aren't even considering STEM careers," McQuiston said.

Along with family support, girls thinking about STEM careers will need to tackle math and science classes and stay curious and look for new ways of solving problems; McQuiston's research is developing a blood test to tell patients if they've had a concussion, a condition that's hard to diagnose just by examining people.

"We can't do it alone," Murray said. "This is your call to action. This is when you can make a difference in your life or in the lives of those around you who have a calling to this field."

(Originally published on Abbott.com)

Johnson & Johnson Chairman and CEO Alex Gorsky Takes the #EmbracingSustainability Challenge

A new Business Roundtable campaign is challenging America's top CEOs to shine a light on how they're doing their part to help improve the health of the environment.

Originally Published by Johnson & Johnson.

For more than 130 years, Johnson & Johnson has made it a mission to help keep people healthy. And since human health and environmental health are inextricably linked, the company is dedicated to helping keep the planet healthy, too.

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Abbott: Top Internship for Healthcare and Tech

Interns have spoken: Abbott is the top college internship program for healthcare and tech & engineering.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott recognizes the need to develop its future leaders early, and has been named the top healthcare and tech & engineering internship program by Vault.

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Price Match Patty: White Woman Tells Latinx Women They're on Welfare

The Children's Place may not be so welcoming if you're Black or Brown.

FACEBOOK

Miriam and Carlita Alejandro, Latinx sisters, shopping at The Children's Place in Camp Hill, Pa., got harassed by a nosey store clerk when they ask to price match clothes. A sales associate said the women were angry because they're on welfare.

Miriam said she was there to help a family who had lost everything in a fire by purchasing clothes for a child. Ms. Rhonda, the store clerk who was helping the ladies, said they may have to wait for the price check because the store was busy.

Miriam wrote on her Facebook page that she responded to Ms. Rhonda: "'Lancaster never gives us any issues or said such a thing, but okay.' Then Price Match Patty aka Genie who was never in our conversation started getting smart saying that we (my sister & I) 'were mad because we were on welfare.'"

Ms. Rhonda didn't know what to do when the Alejandro sisters reported what the nosey store employee said, but she attempted to chastise her. Miriam started recording to document the experience they had.




Price Match Patty has been fired, according to a company statement provided on Monday. Carlita Alejandro posted on Facebook that the company called and offered gift cards and reward points to continue spending her money at the retailer.

Because that's the way to handle your company's screw up-- buy off the people your employees have offended?

Alejandro wrote, "I will NEVER feel safe nor welcomed shopping their stores again!!"

The Children's Place has a history of discrimination. In 2000, they lost a lawsuit concerning profiling customers and had to provide anti-discrimination training in all stores in Massachusetts and hire a consultant to look at their policies.

Unrelated to the incident, two executives left the company this week (Pamela Wallack and Anurup Pruthi), "to pursue other opportunities" — the only minority and the only female in the C-Suite (other than the female CEO). The Children's Place Inc. has never participated in DiversityInc's Top 50 Companies for Diversity competition.

CEO and president Jane Elfers said, "As we approach the last phase of our major systems implementations, the opportunity exists for significant efficiencies across the organization, and today we are announcing a more streamlined senior leadership structure."

Price Match Patty has not been fully identified yet, but some commenters on social media say she's married to a Black man, like Key Fob Kelly in St. Louis. That wouldn't excuse her behavior anyway.

Others say they have been profiled at that same store by Price Match Patty and others before:

Native American Tribes Push Back Against Voter Suppression

Tribes in North Dakota to provide free identification with street addresses to its members for voting.

YOUTUBE

When the Supreme Court supported laws in North Dakota that require IDs must display a "current residential street address," about 70,000 Native American voices that could've been silenced.

But The Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Standing Rock Sioux, Spirit Lake Sioux and Three Affiliated Tribes in North Dakota all have helped provide free IDs with street address to tribal members who live on reservations. As over Tuesday, over 2,000 IDs have been provided, and the programs will continue to provide IDs through election day.

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Texas High School Students Chant the N-Word: Video

The teens that attend Carroll Senior High School have barely been reprimanded.

Screenshot NBC 5

In Southlake, Texas, Carroll Senior High School officials reprimanded a group of white students who were captured on video spewing racist tirades.

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Racist to Latina Voter: 'Trump's Deporting Your Illegal Cousins Today'

Janet Sabriu teaches hater a lesson with recording him: "It's not okay, racists." He apologizes to her after backlash.

FACEBOOK

A white man screamed racist hateful speech out of his car window at Janet Sabriu, a citizen and Houston voter on her way to the polls.

Alongside Sabriu on the road in the Spring Branch neighborhood, the white man criticized Sabriu's driving and yelled, "That's not how we drive in America. Trump's deporting your illegal cousins, today, b----."

Sabriu asked Geirer if he was going to vote, to which he responded, "Learn English… it's my country."

The Latina, who has been a Houston resident for 9 years and is a U.S. citizen, pulled out her cellphone to record the racist rant, which occurred on Thursday. She posted it on Facebook, where she goes by the name Janet Espejel, and it has gone viral with over 3.7 million views.

Sabriu said of her recording the incident, "That's the best lesson you can show somebody."

"It's not okay, racists. It's not okay [to allow] bullying," she told the television station. "We have to stop all this hate, and the only way is respecting everybody; every human being."



He continued to hurl insults at her, "You need a gay friend to help you with your makeup and clothes... Ugly tacky, sticky, skanky bit*h."

Sabriu said she wanted an apology and of defending against racists, she told KHOU, "Speak up. Don't be afraid. That's the only way that we can stop all this hate is just showing and exposing the people because I think the majority (are) good people that don't want this to continue."

While social media quickly identified the racist as Charles Geirer, by Saturday, he was using an alias, Kevin, to apologize to Sabriu, as he started receiving death threats.

He back tracked his vulgar name calling and his racist comments and traded them for an apology stating he suffers from bipolar disorder, and that he reacted poorly in his car that day. He also said he never would've yelled if he knew Sabriu's two-year-old daughter was in the backseat of her car. Of his disorder, he said "it's very real" and "not an excuse."

"All I want to say to her is, 'Miss, I'm so sorry, I hope you can understand more, and I wish you nothing more than love and happiness for your family,' " he told KTRK News.

Houston police tweeted that they were aware of the incident and investigating:

Reader Question: Would you record a racist or bigoted rant if you witnessed it, or experienced it yourself?

Scientists Name Abbott a Top Workplace

The results are in: Abbott's a top 20 workplace for scientists.

Originally Published by Abbott.

What do scientists at Abbott do?

They create tiny, life-saving devices for baby's hearts, seek out neurons that cause Parkinson's and develop tests for Zika. They invent wearable sensors that eliminate the need for painful fingerpricks for people with diabetes. They drive breakthroughs in infant formula and make it possible to test half the world's blood supply.

They are our superheroes. And today, they've named us one of theirs.

After Science Magazine surveyed scientists at biotech companies around the world – ranking each on 23 characteristics from financial strength to having a research-driven environment – Abbott has landed for the 15th year on its Top Employers list.

The Brighton Consulting Group independently evaluated each company's employer reputation score, considering factors such as whether it treats its employees with respect and whether its work-culture values align with employees' personal values.

One of the coolest things about being a scientist at Abbott is we have tracks for both management – and science. You can continue to climb while never giving up the research you love, or you can choose to take a management track and lead a team. There are paths for advancement for both.

Last year alone, we launched more than 20 life-changing technologies around the globe. We do work that matters.