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Anti-Immigration Policies Will be Detrimental to U.S. Economy and Workforce

Economists say deporting undocumented immigrants and restricting immigration will remove billions of dollars from economy and cripple labor market.

President Donald Trump falsely equated undocumented immigrants with violent homicidal gang members during his State of the Union address Tuesday night, smearing a segment of the population economists say is critical for the United States' sustained economic growth.


With the U.S. workforce at near zero growth and projected to grow at an average 0.3 percent annually in the coming years, studies indicate immigrants will be necessary to maintain any positive growth going forward.

"Immigrants will play the primary role in the future growth of the working-age population," according to a Pew Research Center report published last year. "Without immigrants, there would be an estimated 18 million fewer working-age adults in the country in 2035 because of the dearth of U.S.-born children with U.S.-born parents."

While the president did propose a plan with a path to citizenship for a portion of qualifying undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as minors, such a plan is a non-starter among immigration restrictionists in the Republican-controlled Congress, as well as with Democrats who will not sign on to a plan that's tied to the building of a border wall.

Trump said his primary focus is on "America's children, America's struggling workers and America's forgotten communities. … Because Americans are dreamers too." He said the nation needs "immigration policies that focus on the best interests of American workers and American families."

However, according to multiple independent studies, the United States stands to lose hundreds of billions of dollars, stagnate its workforce and deplete a wealth of intellectual capital if it pursues proposed deportation goals.

Immigrants pay federal, state and local taxes; buy consumer goods; purchase cars and homes; and create companies and new jobs at a higher rate than the general population, and they have been the fastest contributors to employment growth.

Here are the facts:

  • The Center for American Progress estimates that "ending DACA would result in a loss of $460.3 billion from the national GDP over the next decade and remove an estimated 685,000 workers from the nation's economy."
  • "Young immigrants eligible for DACA annually contribute $2 billion in state and local taxes, but this number would drop by nearly half without DACA protection," according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP). "Every state stands to lose considerable revenue if we do not maintain the protections and opportunities DACA has allowed."
  • Employment rates increased by 36 percentage points after enrollment in DACA, from 51 percent of respondents employed to 87 percent, according to national survey of DACA recipients, per ITEP.
  • CAP data indicates that 91 percent of DACA recipients are currently employed. Among respondents age 25 and older, employment jumps to 93 percent.
  • According to a recent study by the CATO Institute, deporting those currently in DACA would cost over $60 billion in lost tax revenue and result in a $280 billion reduction in economic growth over the next decade.
  • A study released last month by the nonpartisan Center for American Entrepreneurship (CAE) found that 43 percent of the 2017 Fortune 500 were founded or co-founded by an immigrant or child of an immigrant. "The occurrence of first- or second-generation immigrant founders is significantly higher among the largest Fortune 500 companies — accounting for 52 percent of the top 25 firms and 57 percent of the top 35 firms."
  • According to CAE, firms founded by immigrants "are headquartered in 68 metropolitan areas across 33 states, employ 12.8 million people worldwide and accounted for $5.3 trillion in global revenue in 2016."
  • Sixty percent of the top 25 U.S. technology companies by market value were co-founded by first- or second-generation immigrants, according to Kleiner Perkins' 2017 Internet Trends report.
  • ITEP found that "5 percent of respondents started their own business after receiving DACA. Among respondents 25 years and older, this climbs to 8 percent. Among the American public as a whole, the rate of starting a business is 3.1 percent, meaning that DACA recipients are outpacing the general population in terms of business creation."

On Twitter, President Trump threatened to engage the military to guard the southern border of the Unites States.

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#MeToo: Tarana Burke Notes Progress, Wants More for Black Women

"We can't wait for white folks to decide our trauma is worth focusing on," Burke said.

Tarana Burke is reflecting on the movement she created more than 12 years ago, but it's only been one year since its historic rise worldwide. It has led to women speaking out very publicly against assault. And now that it's been endorsed by the upper echelons of white women, we can celebrate its existence.

On Monday, Burke wrote on Twitter that her work supports all sexual assault survivors, but it "has always centered on Black and Brown women and girls. And it always will…"

So when she heard about Lee Daniels making a Me Too comedy, she expressed objections, saying, "We have to get in front of that."

"To put Me Too and comedy in the same sentence is so deeply offensive… that you think in this moment when we're still unpacking the issue that you can write a comedy about it."

Burke doesn't think the media really cares about the stories of Black women and other women of color.

"We can't wait for white folks to decide that our trauma is worth centering on when we know that it's happening," she told the New York Times.

"We know that there are people, whether they're in entertainment or not, who are ravaging our community. We have to be proactive, unfortunately without the benefit of massive exposure. That's our reality, but it always has been."

The majority of Black women in Hollywood have kept their experiences with sexual assault a secret. But there are a few exceptions.

Gabrielle Union has been, according to Burke, the only woman who not only speaks about her story but also advocates. Few others — Mary J. Blige, Queen Latifah, Fantasia Barrino, and Lupita Nyong'o — have talked about it publicly.

"There is knowing that even if you're not trying to bring down a Black man, a large segment of the population will say 'We don't believe her' because of all these things that we normalize," Burke said.

She recalled when a reporter wanted to do a story on R. Kelly and no one would go on record.

"A lot of folks have slid under the radar," she commented.

While she believes the Black community has doubled down on that thinking, she does note progress.

"You could not have had this kind of public discourse with this many people saying that they believe us — we literally have an example in Anita Hill," she told Paper Magazine. "We don't even have to guess what it would've been like or could've been like or what people would've said 20 years ago, we saw it."

In collaboration with the New York Women's Foundation, Burke's Me Too is helping to fund groups serving communities of color, immigrants, and LGBTQ people.

The "Fund for the MeToo Movement and Allies," awarded $840,000 to the DC Rape Crisis center in Washington, the Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective in Los Angeles, the Firecracker Foundation in Lansing, Michigan, Black Women's Blueprint and the Violence Intervention Program, both in New York; Equality Labs, a national group; and the Los Angeles-based FreeFrom, which works with survivors of domestic violence.

The partnership's goal is to raise $5 million per year.

"This is about supporting the people who support the people," Burke said.

Reader Question: Why do you think Black women's stories of sexual assault have been largely unheard or drowned out?

One 'Pocahontas' is Real, The Other Isn't

Sen. Elizabeth Warren releases a DNA test as the Republican House Majority Leader's family member is revealed as taking government set-asides fraudulently.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and GOP House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy

In a rebuttal to President Trump's ridiculing of her as "fake Pocahontas," Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released a DNA test that shows "strong evidence" she has Native-American heritage. Meanwhile, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's family benefited from a U.S. program for minorities based on the doubtful claim his brother-in-law is Cherokee.

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Migrant Children Rounded Up, 'Discretely' Moved to a Tent City in West Texas During the Night

Moving the children under the cover of night is supposedly to prevent them from trying to escape.

President Trump made the unconscionable decision to transport roughly 1,600 migrant children from various private foster homes and shelters around the country to a tent city in Tornillo, Texas.

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Voting Rights Protections for Minorities in Danger: Report

Citizens "continue to suffer significant, and profoundly unequal, limitations on their ability to vote," said Catherine E. Lhamon, chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

REUTERS

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights warns that voting rights for minorities around the country are in danger. The federal government isn't doing anything to counteract it, especially since Republicans have most to lose in key midterm elections.

A report, released on Wednesday, cited strict voter ID laws; closing polling places; cutting early voting; and voting roll purges and challenges to eligibility are all impacting minority-voting rights.

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Trump Says of Aid to Puerto Rico: 'Incredibly Successful' Storm Response

"If he thinks the death of 3,000 people is a success, God help us all," said Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan.

REUTERS

President Trump actually boasted on Tuesday about the shortcomings that killed 3,000 Puerto Ricans during, and after, Hurricane Maria last September.

He said that while the response to hurricanes in Texas and Florida got excellent grades, "I think that Puerto Rico was an incredible, unsung success."

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Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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What Makes This Angry White Sportscaster Think He Can Criticize LeBron James​?

Ken Harrelson said James should keep his "nose out of politics and just play."

Ken "Hawk" Harrelson, a longtime Chicago White Sox broadcaster in his final season in the booth, attempted to slam NBA superstar LeBron James, and other athletes, who voice their opinion on politics.

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