Accenture Publishes 2017 Corporate Citizenship Report

Company's achievements include surpassing 2020 carbon target and advancing Skills to Succeed initiative.

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Accenture (No. 14 on the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies list) has released its 2017 Corporate Citizenship Report, which details the company's goals and progress toward helping improve the way the world works and lives.


"Our digital, increasingly connected world provides the opportunity for businesses, governments and nonprofits to collaborate like never before and find new ways to help people flourish in this new era," said Pierre Nanterme, Accenture's chairman and CEO. "Working with our partners – and combining human ingenuity with groundbreaking technologies – our 442,000 people around the world turn ideas into innovations that create positive, lasting impact."

Accenture's 2017 report celebrates a year of milestones. For example, the company:

  • Took steps toward minimizing its environmental footprint, surpassing its goal to reduce per-employee carbon emissions by 50 percent three years ahead of schedule.
  • Set goals to increase the number of women in its ranks, including a commitment to achieve a gender-balanced workforce by 2025.
  • Continued to collaborate with nonprofit partners through its Skills to Succeed initiative to equip people globally with skills to gain employment or build a business. By the end of 2017, Accenture had equipped 2.2 million people with these skills — well on the way to its goal of equipping 3 million people by 2020.

The report also highlights how Accenture is:

  • Addressing complex societal problems. To solve challenges associated with individuals without officially recognized identities, Accenture is partnering with Microsoft on ID2020, a project using blockchain and biometric technologies to enable these 1.1 billion individuals to access and share their data electronically.
  • Helping people gain skills for the digital economy, with a continued focus on apprenticeships. In the U.S., the company expanded its apprenticeship program to provide under-represented groups greater access to digital economy jobs. For example, Accenture Federal Services launched an innovative public-private partnership with the City of San Antonio, Texas, and nonprofit partners to help participants — many without a college degree — acquire the training and skills needed for entry-level jobs.
  • Shaping responsible businesses around the world. Accenture's Diverse Supplier Development Program matches the company's senior executives with diverse supplier "protégé" companies to help them grow their businesses. By the end of Accenture's 2017 fiscal year, on Aug. 31, 2017, 133 diverse suppliers had graduated or were in the process of completing the program.
"By merging human insight, skill and creativity with technology, we can solve complex challenges, improve the lives of millions of people around the world and help build a more equal society," said Jill Huntley, Accenture's managing director of global corporate citizenship. "Solutions grounded in emerging technology, such as artificial intelligence and virtual reality, are enabling companies to innovate in ways we never thought possible and to see new opportunities to make a real difference in the world around them."


Accenture has been included on FORTUNE's Change the World list for the past two years and has been recognized as one of the World's Most Ethical Companies by the Ethisphere Institute for more than 10 years. To read Accenture's 2017 Corporate Citizenship report and to discover more about the company's commitment to corporate citizenship, visit: accenture.com/corporatecitizenship.

Successful Companies Pivot to New Opportunities by Revitalizing – Not Neglecting – Their Core Businesses, Accenture Report Finds

Report identifies three actions common to the six percent of companies that have embraced the future most decisively

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Originally Published by Accenture.

The majority (54 percent) of C-level executives expect their new business activities to generate at least half of their company's revenues within the next three years, even though only one-third (33 percent) of the executives said their company currently generates more than half of its revenues from business activities started in the past three years, according to new research from Accenture.

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Accenture Commits $200 Million to Education, Training and Skills Initiatives over next Three Years to Equip People Around the World for Work in the Digital Age

Commitment includes company's Skills to Succeed goal to equip more than 3 million people with job and entrepreneurial skills by 2020.

REUTERS

Originally published by Accenture.

Supporting its vision to improve the way the world works and lives, Accenture (NYSE: ACN) is committing more than US$200 million over the next three years to help equip people around the world with job skills for the digital age.

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REUTERS

Originally Published by Accenture.

While most companies recognize the value of a digitally enabled supply chain – empowered by new technologies like artificial intelligence, blockchain, big data and analytics ­– many chief supply chain officers (CSCOs) are not leveraging their C-suite counterparts to help reinvent the supply chain function and transform it into an engine of new growth models and customer experiences, according to new research from Accenture.

The research report, Drive Your Own Disruption: Is your supply chain in sleep mode?, reveals that the 900 supply chain executives surveyed were more likely to say that they see their function in two years as a cost efficiency driver (60 percent) or a support function (68 percent) than as a competitive differentiator (48 percent) or a growth enabler (53 percent) within their organizations, which can leave significant value on the table.

"Supply chain executives should take no comfort in being categorized as a support function," said Mohammed (Mo) Hajibashi, a managing director at Accenture and global Supply Chain lead in its Products industry practice. "In this digital era where customers demand speed to market and hyper-personalization, these executives need to ensure that their supply chain function is not only a key differentiator but also ensures the sustained growth of their organizations. The fast and efficient adoption of the right new technologies that enable a new way of working, along with increased C-suite engagement with the supply chain function, are the keys to achieving growth via new digital business models that create new customer experiences, craved by the consumer."

Accenture research found that 80 percent of the supply chain executives surveyed identify the chief information officer or chief technology officer – not the CEO, chief operating officer (COO) or chief financial officer (CFO) – as key stakeholders, even despite the major role the CFO has in making technology investment decisions and the COO's role in designing the operating model.

Furthermore, in many organizations, the supply chain isn't seen as a driver of differentiation and aggressive growth. Meanwhile, the CSCOs blame the absence of a clear business strategy (cited by 43 percent of CSCOs surveyed), together with an inadequately skilled workforce (48 percent) and incompatible legacy systems (44 percent), for their function's inability to drive value for the organization.

How To Overcome C-suite Challenges

According to the report, CSCOs have an opportunity to work with the full C-suite to overcome three core challenges – leadership, labor and legacy technology – and move their function toward better and more strategic partnerships that will provide the organization with increased value-driving potential.

  • Leadership. The CSCO will need to be better aligned with business strategy and build a new and productive working relationship with the executives responsible for long-term digital investment: the CFO and COO.
  • Labor. CSCOs need to build a workforce that focuses on core supply chain workers, "adaptive" (part-time and on-demand) workers and artificial intelligence / robotics — all working together to drive productivity at speed. The CSCO will also need to leverage their C-suite connections to secure support for a reskilling strategy founded on continuous learning.
  • Legacy Technology. Digitally decoupling legacy systems provides a less-resource-intensive and more impactful way to drive agility than spending on new, more compatible systems. CSCOs can start by decoupling data from their legacy IT systems, replicating it and moving it, in real time, to cloud-based data "lakes" that are accessible to customers.
To find out more about the report, visit Accenture.com/wakeupyoursupplychain. Join the conversation at @Accenture #supplychain and #wakeupyoursupplychain.