Abbott: From Summer Camp to Future Stem Leaders

For the second year, nearly 40 Abbott volunteers shared their passion for, and expertise in, science and engineering with local youth.

ABBOTT

(Originally published on Abbott.com)


Exploring in childhood can lead to a fulfilling career in adulthood.

Just ask Abbott's (No. 10 on the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies list) scientists and engineers who recently volunteered their time, talents and energies at a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) camp for girls.

Their mission?

To "help bring science and engineering to life through hands-on experiences that are interactive and fun," said John Frels, vice president of research and development for Abbott's diagnostics business.

And that's exactly what they did.

For the second year, nearly 40 Abbott volunteers shared their passion for, and expertise in, science and engineering with local youth as part of the iBIO Institute's STEM Girls Summer Camp. The Institute's EDUCATE Center – which hosted the week-long event – aims to inspire the next generation of innovators through industry-led STEM programs for teachers and students. Abbott was a sponsor of the camp, which took place near our company headquarters in Waukegan, Ill.

Thanks to Abbott's volunteers, more than 125 young girls in grades 3 through 8 had the chance to participate in Abbott-developed STEM activities. The students learned about:

  • Bioluminescence – Studying how light is made by living organisms such as fireflies and deep-sea fishes, and learning about various species of fireflies, their habitat and luminescence patterns.
  • Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing – Converting a two-dimensional design into a 3D object and learning how Abbott uses this printing technology as an engineering tool.
  • Heart Health – Making stethoscopes and viewing demonstrations of cardiac catheters, stents and heart-valve models.

On the final day of the camp, family members were invited to attend a STEM fair where the students showed what they had learned during the week.

"We hope that these experiences will inspire girls to consider pursuing careers in science and engineering in the future," said John.

For more examples of Abbott's STEM education work, see this video of Abbott's female scientists sharing insights with girls on STEM, and this story highlighting Abbott's STEM programs to inspire the next generation.

Abbott: Connected Devices Turn Data Into Better Health

Abbott's Robert Ford Joins a Panel Discussing the Potential for Connected Medical Devices to Improve Patient Care and Drive Better Outcomes.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Today's medical devices are creating terabytes of information that gives patients, doctors and health providers real-time insight into someone's vital statistics, heart health and even bloodwork.

But can all this new information really make someone healthier?

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Abbott Introduces the Afinion™ 2 Analyzer Rapid Test System for Diabetes Management

State-of-the-art multi-assay test system helps people with diabetes get the HbA1c results they need within three minutes — allowing more time for consultation and care during a single healthcare visit.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott announced the launch of its Afinion™ 2 analyzer in the U.S., the newest generation of the Afinion test system. The Afinion 2 builds on Abbott's heritage in diabetes care by empowering patients with information about their health that they can discuss with their providers during a single visit.

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Abbott's Xience Sierra Heart Stent Receives National Reimbursement in Japan to Treat People with Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease, which is the second leading cause of death in Japan.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott announced that Japan's Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare (MHLW) granted national reimbursement for XIENCE Sierra™, the newest generation of the company's gold-standard XIENCE everolimus-eluting coronary stent. XIENCE Sierra improves upon previous versions of XIENCE with an enhanced stent design, a new delivery system, and unique sizes to help doctors treat challenging cases.

XIENCE Sierra was designed to help doctors more easily treat people with difficult-to-treat blockages that involve multiple or totally blocked arteries or complications such as diabetes. Complex cases are increasingly prevalent as people with coronary artery disease are living longer.

"Extensive clinical data and 10 years of real-world experience with the XIENCE family of stents provide doctors with confidence that they are treating their patients with one of the safest stents available," said Chuck Brynelsen, senior vice president of Abbott's vascular business. "National reimbursement of XIENCE Sierra will provide people in Japan with greater access to this life-changing technology that can help them live their best lives."

Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease, which is the second leading cause of death in Japan. National reimbursement in Japan will enable doctors to treat more patients with XIENCE Sierra through the country's health insurance plans. XIENCE Sierra was approved in Japan on April 4, 2018, received CE Mark in Europe late last year, and is under review with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

XIENCE has been studied in over 100 clinical trials and in 10 years of global real-world experience. Its safety profile is unprecedented with consistent low rates of stent thrombosis, even in complex cases. More than eight million people worldwide have received a XIENCE stent since its initial regulatory approval.

Toyota: Building Skills for High-Demand Jobs

Twenty-five elementary, middle and high schools to implement innovative project-based STEM programs in San Antonio.

TOYOTA

Schools in the greater San Antonio area will soon have additional resources to help prepare youth for the jobs of tomorrow. Toyota USA Foundation, together with Project Lead The Way (PLTW), awarded $400,000 in grants to provide curriculum and teacher professional development focused on computer science, engineering, and biomedical science.

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