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Abbott: Study Shows Nutrition Program Could Save Hospitals Up to $3,800 Per Patient

One in three people enter a hospital malnourished or at risk of malnutrition.

Making sure people stay nourished in the hospital has shown to help patients recover, and real-world evidence confirms its cost benefits too. The research, published in American Health & Drug Benefits journal and supported by Abbott (No. 10 on the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies list), found that when Advocate Health Care implemented a nutrition care program at four of its Chicago area hospitals, it showed more than $4.8 million in cost savings due to shorter hospital stays and lower readmission rates.3


Addressing malnutrition is a growing concern, as 1 in 3 people enter the hospital malnourished or at risk of malnutrition.1-2  Decades of research prove that when patients are poorly nourished, it can impact their recovery, including higher risk of complications (such as pressure ulcers, infections and falls) and more frequent readmissions. Studies also show that poor nutrition can cause increased costs of care and longer hospital stays–with the average hospital stay costing nearly $2,000 per day.4 As a result, hospitals and health care systems, such as Advocate Health Care, are looking at the value of nutrition to improve care and help patients get back to living a healthier life.

Starting in 2014, Advocate Health Care implemented two models of a nutrition care program for patients at-risk of malnutrition, and the results from this study published in December 2016, found that doing so reduced 30-day readmission rates by 27 percent and the average hospital stay by nearly two days.5 To evaluate the cost-savings of this program, researchers used a novel, web-based budget impact model to assess the potential cost savings from the avoided readmissions and reduced time in hospital. Compared to the hospitals' previous readmission rates and patients' average length of stay, researchers found that optimizing nutrition care in the four hospitals resulted in roughly $3,800 cost savings per patient treated for malnutrition.

"Value-based care means looking comprehensively at patient care to identify gaps and opportunities for improvement," said Lee Sacks, MD, executive vice president and chief medical officer of Advocate Health Care. "The study's findings demonstrate that modest changes in the way we care for patients, such as ensuring patients are nourished during their hospital stay, can have a big impact in reducing costs and improving health outcomes."

"This research confirms that implementing nutrition-focused quality improvement programs, like the ones at Advocate Health Care, can help patients recover from their hospitalization faster while also removing some of the burden of financial pressures placed on health systems today," said Suela Sulo, PhD, a health outcomes researcher at Abbott and lead author of the cost impact study. "As providers, administrators, and payers face added pressures from rising healthcare costs, value-based nutrition interventions should be considered in all hospitals across the U.S."

About the QIP Study:

A Comprehensive Nutrition-focused Quality Improvement Program Reduces 30-day Readmissions and Length of Stay in Hospitalized Patients, published in Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in December 2016, was a multi-site, two-group, pre-post study to evaluate two nutrition Quality Improvement Programs (QIP) at four Advocate Health Care hospitals.

The study's primary outcome was 30-day unplanned readmissions, with a secondary outcome of hospital length of stay. A total of 1,269 participants aged 18+ at risk of malnutrition were enrolled between October 13, 2014 and April 2, 2015.

The study was funded by Abbott, which had no role in data collection or analysis.

References

1. Coats KG et al. J Am Diet Assoc. 1993; 93:27–33.

2. Thomas DR et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002; 75: 308-313.

3. Sulo S et al. Am Health Drug Benefits, 2017 ; 10 (5): 262-270.

4. HCUP Fast Stats. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). December 2016. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/faststats/national/inpatienttrends.jsp.

5. Sriram K et al. JPEN. 2016; 40(1):1

The Conversation

NEW COVERAGE DECISION EXTENDS ABBOTT'S INNOVATIVE PAIN THERAPY OPTION TO 22 MILLION AMERICANS LIVING WITH CHRONIC PAIN

Abbott is the only company in the world with FDA and CE Mark approval to offer dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurostimulation therapy to treat complex nerve pain conditions.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott announced a new national coverage determination for the company's dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurostimulation pain therapy through Aetna®, a leading health benefits company in the United States. With this coverage decision, Aetna will provide more than 22 million medical plan members with access to Abbott's DRG therapy for people with chronic pain.

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Abbott: Expediting Blood Testing With i-Stat

The portable, handheld i-STAT Alinity delivers quick blood test results anywhere you are.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Every day, countless blood samples are tested all around the world for one purpose: to help diagnose and treat medical conditions. From the couple eagerly awaiting the results of a pregnancy blood test to a worried cancer patient hoping for more answers, diagnostic blood tests give vital insight into what's happening underneath the skin.

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Abbott: Freestyle Libre 14 Day, Now FDA Approved

Abbott's flash glucose monitor now FDA-approved for two weeks of use in U.S. between sensor changes.

Originally Published by Abbott.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved FreeStyle Libre 14 day— Abbott's revolutionary continuous glucose monitoring system. In the U.S., you can wear the sensor up to 14 days with high accuracy.

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​Abbott Announces Freedom 2 Save Program For Employees To Address Student Debt

Two-thirds of millennials aren't saving for retirement; benefit means student debt won't prevent retirement savings.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Historic levels of student debt have forced many people to choose between saving for their futures and paying off school loans. Abbott announced a groundbreaking program that addresses the student debt crisis and changes that math.

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Abbott: Connected Devices Turn Data Into Better Health

Abbott's Robert Ford Joins a Panel Discussing the Potential for Connected Medical Devices to Improve Patient Care and Drive Better Outcomes.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Today's medical devices are creating terabytes of information that gives patients, doctors and health providers real-time insight into someone's vital statistics, heart health and even bloodwork.

But can all this new information really make someone healthier?

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Abbott Introduces the Afinion™ 2 Analyzer Rapid Test System for Diabetes Management

State-of-the-art multi-assay test system helps people with diabetes get the HbA1c results they need within three minutes — allowing more time for consultation and care during a single healthcare visit.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott announced the launch of its Afinion™ 2 analyzer in the U.S., the newest generation of the Afinion test system. The Afinion 2 builds on Abbott's heritage in diabetes care by empowering patients with information about their health that they can discuss with their providers during a single visit.

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Abbott's Xience Sierra Heart Stent Receives National Reimbursement in Japan to Treat People with Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease, which is the second leading cause of death in Japan.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott announced that Japan's Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare (MHLW) granted national reimbursement for XIENCE Sierra™, the newest generation of the company's gold-standard XIENCE everolimus-eluting coronary stent. XIENCE Sierra improves upon previous versions of XIENCE with an enhanced stent design, a new delivery system, and unique sizes to help doctors treat challenging cases.

XIENCE Sierra was designed to help doctors more easily treat people with difficult-to-treat blockages that involve multiple or totally blocked arteries or complications such as diabetes. Complex cases are increasingly prevalent as people with coronary artery disease are living longer.

"Extensive clinical data and 10 years of real-world experience with the XIENCE family of stents provide doctors with confidence that they are treating their patients with one of the safest stents available," said Chuck Brynelsen, senior vice president of Abbott's vascular business. "National reimbursement of XIENCE Sierra will provide people in Japan with greater access to this life-changing technology that can help them live their best lives."

Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease, which is the second leading cause of death in Japan. National reimbursement in Japan will enable doctors to treat more patients with XIENCE Sierra through the country's health insurance plans. XIENCE Sierra was approved in Japan on April 4, 2018, received CE Mark in Europe late last year, and is under review with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

XIENCE has been studied in over 100 clinical trials and in 10 years of global real-world experience. Its safety profile is unprecedented with consistent low rates of stent thrombosis, even in complex cases. More than eight million people worldwide have received a XIENCE stent since its initial regulatory approval.