Minorities Have too Much Influence, Trump Supporters Say: Poll

An ABC News/Washington Post poll released this week found that 38 percent of Trump supporters believe minorities have too much influence in society, while only9 percent of Hillary Clinton supporters feel that way. In fact, 67percent of Clinton supporters feelminorities have too little influence, something only 17 percent of Trump supporters think.


For the poll, respondents were asked “whether you think [each group] has too (much) influence in the country these days, too (little) influence, or about the right amount.”

WomenMenWhitesMinorities
Trump supporters
Too much8%20838
About right69686438
Too little2182117

WomenMenWhitesMinorities
Clinton supporters
Too much650539
About right35373721
Too little5810767

The beliefs of Trump supporters persist despite statistics that show otherwise. According to a recent report released by the U.S. Census whites make, on average, a higher salary than Blacks or Hispanics. And men continue to fare better than women.

Related Story: U.S. Income Surges, but Women, Minorities Remain Behind

The “about right” influence is not seen in the workplace, either. Blacks, Latinos and Asians hold just 22.5 percent of management roles and only 13 percent of senior management roles in U.S. companies overall. (Among theDiversityInc Top 10, Blacks, Latinos and Asians hold 31.2 percent of management roles and 18.3percent of senior management roles.)

And despite making up just over half of the population, women do not boast impressive numbers either, holding just 39 percent of management roles and only 28.8 percent of senior management roles in U.S. companies overall. (Among the Top 10, women hold 47.6 percent of management roles and 39.2 percent of senior management roles.)

Related Story: Don’t Like Diversity Then You Probably Love Trump

According to the survey release, “majorities of Hillary Clinton’s supporters believe minorities and women have too little influence in American society, while half say men and whites have too much influence. For all his outsider appeal, Donald Trump’s supporters, by contrast, are far more apt to endorse the status quo in this regard.”

Past research also reflects this observation. A Pew Research Center study released earlier this year found a correlation that links negative feelings regarding diversity, as well as Islamophobia, to “warm feelings” toward Trump. The survey, which polled Republican and Republican-leaning voters, found that, overall, those who support Trump tend to be less supportive of diversity. The survey asked if having the majority of the country being Black, Asian and Latino which the Census predicts will be the case over the next three decades is “bad for the country” or “good/neither good nor bad for the country.” For respondents who said it’s bad, nearly 50 percent report very warm feelings for Trump, with an additional 16 percent saying they have warm feelings.

Related Story: Racial Resentment Clearly Motivates Trump Supporters, Study Shows

Another study released earlier this year, published by Western Political Science Association and Salon.com, found the same pattern and concluded that Trump supporters specifically had more negative feelings about diversity when compared even to supporters of other Republican candidates. “The results are pretty clear: Trump supporters really dislike many groups in America,” the study’s authors write. “For these voters, Trump’s blend of casual racism and muscular nativism is the core of his appeal.”

Per the findings, Trump supporters were more likely than supporters of other Republican candidates to have negative feelings toward Latinos, Muslims and feminists. (Negative feelings toward Blacks were not statistically different compared to those of Republicans supporting other candidates.)

According to the authors, “We find that what drives support for Trump is the mistaken belief that the government serves the interests of Blacks, rather than whites.”

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