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Obama Reportedly Surprised by McCain's Eulogy Request

"We shared, for all our differences, a fidelity to something higher — the ideals for which generations of Americans and immigrants alike have fought, marched, and sacrificed," Obama said of McCain.

Former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush will pay tribute to Sen. John McCain during a Saturday funeral service at the Washington National Cathedral.


In April, McCain, who died at age 81 on Aug. 25 after a battle with an aggressive form of brain cancer, called Obama and asked him to deliver one of the eulogies at his funeral.

Obama agreed that he would.

"He was taken aback by the request, aides say, as was George W. Bush, another former rival, who received a similar call from McCain this spring," reports CNN.

Obama, who defeated McCain in the 2008 election, said in a statement that he and McCain "were members of different generations, came from completely different backgrounds, and competed at the highest level of politics."

He added, "But we shared, for all our differences, a fidelity to something higher — the ideals for which generations of Americans and immigrants alike have fought, marched, and sacrificed."

Steve Duprey, a longtime friend of the late Senator, told CNN:

"I think it is John McCain imparting a lesson in civility by asking the two men who defeated him to speak, as an example to America that differences in political views and contests shouldn't be so important that we lose our common bonds and the civility that is, or used to be, a hallmark of American democracy."

McCain served for 30 years in the Senate representing Arizona. Former Vice President Joe Biden, his longtime Senate colleague, paid tribute to the two-time Republican presidential candidate, during a 90-minute memorial service at North Phoenix Baptist Church on Thursday.

Biden said the Vietnam War hero and venerable politician was like family.

"I always thought of John as a brother," he said.

"We had a hell of a lot of family fights," Biden said to laughter from the 3,500 or so mourners packing the auditorium, according to Reuters.

The Conversation

Rice University Waives Tuition for Low-Income and Middle-Class Students

Could this start a trend towards universal education for all American students?

Rice University, a private 4-year university in Houston, TX., has decided to award scholarships that will cover the cost of tuition to students from low-income and middle-income families starting next fall.

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97-Year-Old Black Woman Has Been an Election Day Poll Worker for 79 Years

Laura Mitnaul Wooten, honored during the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's annual conference, urged Black people to vote in midterm elections.

Left to right: Chair of NNPA Dorothy R. Leavell; Laura Mitnaul Wooten; and NNPA President and CEO Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. / DIVERSITYINC

Laura Mitnaul Wooten plans to head to the polls on Nov. 6 to vote in the midterm elections, and to work, as she's done every Election Day for the past 79 years, consecutively. Wooten said that the right to vote, which so many suffered and even died for, is currently being taken for granted.

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Obama to Trump: We're Supposed to Stand up to Discrimination and to Nazi Sympathizers

To voters: You can make sure that white nationalists don't feel empowered to march in Charlottesville in the middle of the day.

CLICK ON DETRIOT

Former President Barack Obama kicked off his campaigning for November's midterms, on Friday afternoon, and took jabs at President Trump and the spineless backbones of his Republican constituents.

Obama spared no expense rebuking the administration's actions that have emboldened racists.

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Photo courtesy of Facebook

Chicago hip-hop artist Vic Mensa has organized an event through his SaveMoneySaveLife foundation, giving away 10,000 pairs of shoes in the same neighborhood where the bait truck sting took place.

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Explosive Taking a Knee Explanation: Video Goes Wild, 15 Million Views and Accelerating!

White man running against Ted Cruz nails it. You need to send this video to everyone you know.

A video where a Democratic congressman shares his thoughts on why NFL players take a knee during the national anthem has gone viral with more than 15 million views.

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Kofi Annan, the First Black U.N. Secretary General, Dies at 80

He showed "grace, humanity, humility, and strength" while doing "the most impossible job on Earth."

REUTERS

Kofi Annan, who was described by his own foundation colleagues, as "strong and fit" while "he worked until the very end, without giving himself a break," succumbed to a short illness on Saturday at age 80. His foundation made the announcement on Twitter.

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Akbar Cook is the principal of West Side High School in Newark, New Jersey and he takes his job and responsibilities as an educator and administrator seriously.

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NYU Announces Full-Ride Scholarship for Every Medical Student

All students enrolled in the MD degree program are eligible.

With all this talk about free education, New York University (NYU) is taking the decision out of the government's hands.

On Thursday, the top 10 medical school in the country announced its plans to offer a full scholarship to all new, current, and future medical students.

This effort is critical due to anticipated shortages of medical professionals. Roughly 75 percent of medical students in the United States graduated with some debt last year. The average debt owed is $191,000, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

According to Rafael Rivera, associate dean for admissions and financial aid, "The debt can scare people away. One of those individuals could be the one to find a cure for cancer. For us, it's important to have the best applicant pool possible and society deserves nothing less"

By 2025, the medical field is expecting to have a shortage of 11,000 surgeons and 98,000 lab technicians. This is largely due to mounting tuition costs that the middle to lower class and minority groups feel the most. In 2015 the medical school acceptance rate was 41.1% and, while white, Asian, and Hispanic students were all accepted at roughly that rate, Black or African American students were accepted at a rate of 34%.

This is despite the fact that the average MCAT scores for Black students are only, on average, 7 points lower than their white counterparts. In addition, while White students see a graduation rate of 58.8%, while Black and Hispanic students only graduate at a rate of 6% and 5% respectively.

It is believed that these lessened costs would encourage doctors to accept potentially lower paying jobs such as those needed in primary care. It is also predicted that the biggest beneficiaries of this would be minority groups.

According to an AAMC study, "Research shows that physician diversity adds value to the health-care system by expanding access to health care. Racial and ethnic minority physicians are more likely to practice primary care than their white peers. Black or African-American, Hispanic or Latino, and American Indian or Alaska Native physicians are also more likely to practice in medically underserved areas."

This effort has been 11 years in the making. The dean of NYU Langone Health says the college has raised $450 million out of the $600 million needed to make the scholarship permanent.

He also said, "Our goal was to raise enough money to enable students to graduate with as little debt as possible."