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Obama Reportedly Surprised by McCain's Eulogy Request

"We shared, for all our differences, a fidelity to something higher — the ideals for which generations of Americans and immigrants alike have fought, marched, and sacrificed," Obama said of McCain.

Former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush will pay tribute to Sen. John McCain during a Saturday funeral service at the Washington National Cathedral.


In April, McCain, who died at age 81 on Aug. 25 after a battle with an aggressive form of brain cancer, called Obama and asked him to deliver one of the eulogies at his funeral.

Obama agreed that he would.

"He was taken aback by the request, aides say, as was George W. Bush, another former rival, who received a similar call from McCain this spring," reports CNN.

Obama, who defeated McCain in the 2008 election, said in a statement that he and McCain "were members of different generations, came from completely different backgrounds, and competed at the highest level of politics."

He added, "But we shared, for all our differences, a fidelity to something higher — the ideals for which generations of Americans and immigrants alike have fought, marched, and sacrificed."

Steve Duprey, a longtime friend of the late Senator, told CNN:

"I think it is John McCain imparting a lesson in civility by asking the two men who defeated him to speak, as an example to America that differences in political views and contests shouldn't be so important that we lose our common bonds and the civility that is, or used to be, a hallmark of American democracy."

McCain served for 30 years in the Senate representing Arizona. Former Vice President Joe Biden, his longtime Senate colleague, paid tribute to the two-time Republican presidential candidate, during a 90-minute memorial service at North Phoenix Baptist Church on Thursday.

Biden said the Vietnam War hero and venerable politician was like family.

"I always thought of John as a brother," he said.

"We had a hell of a lot of family fights," Biden said to laughter from the 3,500 or so mourners packing the auditorium, according to Reuters.

Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole Selected as Board Chair and Seventh President of National Council of Negro Women

"My heart is overflowing with gratitude for this honor to serve as the seventh president of this organization that has been a voice of and for Black women," said Dr. Cole.

The National Council of Negro Women (NCMW) selected Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole as its chair and seventh president during the closing session of their 58th Biennial National Convention in Washington, D.C. Ms. Ingrid Saunders Jones, who served as NCNW's chair for more than six years, will continue to serve the organization as the immediate past chair.

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HBCUs​ Set Foundation for Black Politicians in Key Positions

"Black people have always been underestimated. The Black college experience is still an exceptional way to train young people," said Senator Art Haywood, a Morehouse Graduate.

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What Kamala Harris, Alma Adams, Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams all have in common, in addition to being influential in U.S. politics, is they're graduates of Historically Black Colleges and Universities ( HBCUs) — Howard University, North Carolina A&T, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University, and Spelman College.

Approximately 40 percent of the members of Congress are HBCU graduates, according to the Network Journal, a Black professional and small business magazine. And recipients of The United Negro College Fund and Thurgood Marshall Foundation scholarships graduate from college at rates well above the national average.

"We're producing outstanding leaders in all of the major professions," said Harry L. Williams, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and former Delaware State president.

"Anytime you can look at (HBCU) success stories, it just enhances their relevancy and continues to move them forward in a positive way."

This year, a record 38 women of color were elected to Congress. Many of them are HBCU graduates.

The prospect of so many Black-college graduates being elected to statewide office in the same year is unprecedented, Keneshia Grant, an assistant professor of political science at Howard University, said.

And they are touting their HBCU training. Abrams expressed her disapproval of legislation plans for education that did not include those institutions.

Gillum responded to President Trump's tweet attacking him about his lack of Ivy League education:

Art Haywood is one of four Black state senators in Pennsylvania, and one of two from Morehouse.

"If the two Black state senators had come from Harvard or Yale, then those schools would get all the credit," Haywood said.

"Black people have always been underestimated," Haywood said. "I don't think there's any more validation required. The Black college experience is still an exceptional way to train young people."

Of politicians like Abrams and Gillum, the president of HBCU Dillard University Walter Kimbrough said they are sending a message: "It's a reaffirmation, not only for students but for families, that you can go to an HBCU and compete with anyone."

Approximately 13 percent of HBCU graduates are CEOS, 40 percent are engineers and 50 percent are professors at non-HBCUs, according to the Network Journal.

The HBCUs Make America Strong: The Positive Economic Impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities study shows how the United States economy benefits from HBCUs: $14.8 billion in economic impact. In addition, graduates predominantly come from low-income areas, giving them and the communities the opportunity to break cycles of poverty and open doors to successful and lucrative careers. Individual graduates can earn $927,000 within their lifetime, $130 billion collectively over their lifetime.

Michelle Obama: Bigotry of Trump's 'Birther' Claims Put Her Family in Danger

"And for this I'd never forgive him," Obama writes in her new memoir.

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Former first lady Michelle Obama is trending on Twitter for what is revealed in her new memoir.

In public speeches, when giving her opinion on the current state of the U.S., Obama never refers to President Trump by name. But in her new 426-page book, "Becoming," she mentions her disdain for Trump.

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Democracy in Color's Steve Phillips Shares His Perspective on Midterm Elections

There was an extraordinary turnout of people rallying for "the defender of white supremacy in the White House," said Phillips.

Author Steve Phillips speaking at a 2016 DiversityInc event.

By Keka Araujo and Sheryl Estrada

There's a multicultural progressive New American Majority that made its voice heard in Tuesday's midterm elections, according to Steve Phillips, a national political leader and civil rights lawyer.

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Michael Jordan Makes Multimillion-Dollar Donation to Break Poverty Cycle Through Mentorship

"My mentors believed in me and taught me the power of perseverance," Jordan said.

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NBA legend Michael Jordan believes so much in the power of mentorship that he has made a multimillion-dollar donation to a national nonprofit whose mission is to "break the cycle of generational poverty."

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Native American Tribes Push Back Against Voter Suppression

Tribes in North Dakota to provide free identification with street addresses to its members for voting.

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When the Supreme Court supported laws in North Dakota that require IDs must display a "current residential street address," about 70,000 Native American voices that could've been silenced.

But The Turtle Mountain Chippewa, Standing Rock Sioux, Spirit Lake Sioux and Three Affiliated Tribes in North Dakota all have helped provide free IDs with street address to tribal members who live on reservations. As over Tuesday, over 2,000 IDs have been provided, and the programs will continue to provide IDs through election day.

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Oprah: Blood of Men, Women Lynched for Trying to Vote 'Has Seeped Into My DNA'

"I refuse to let their sacrifices be in vain," Oprah Winfrey said, at a rally for Stacey Abrams.

In the first of two events on Thursday, Oprah Winfrey gave an electrifying speech in Marietta in support of Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

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Oprah's Headed to Georgia to Campaign for Stacey Abrams

Oprah Winfrey will participate in two town hall-style events.

Oprah Winfrey has endorsed Stacey Abrams, the Democratic candidate in a tight gubernatorial race, and will visit Georgia.

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