Male CEOs: Men Can Improve How They Mentor Women

At the 2019 DiversityIncTop 50 event on May 7, Clint Wallace, Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Sanofi North America (No. 31), Bruce Broussard, CEO of Humana (No. 42), Johnny Taylor, President and CEO of SHRM and Luke Visconti, Chairman of DiversityInc, were the power players tabbed with discussing how they found success mentoring women.

To open the discussion, Visconti highlighted the MARC program (Men Advocating Real Change), that Clint Wallace implemented at Sanofi. In less than 2 years, 320 executives had completed the program within the organization. The goal of MARC is to further engage men in the role of being a mentor to women in the organization.

Fear was mainly the driving force that prevented men from participating in the past.

“We’ve heard from many men, who would say, ‘Look, I want to get on this journey, but I’m afraid, I don’t know how to have the conversation,'” Mr. Wallace explained.

A major turning point was when the question was asked through the organization to women, “Have you ever encountered someone saying something inappropriate to you in the workplace?”

The men in the room were taken aback to see the number of hands that were raised. Bruce Broussard takes a unique approach to mentorship at Humana. He assigns a group of employees, who are mostly women, an issue that they have to solve by using an array of resources at the company.

This exercise allows the employees to establish sponsorship outside their specific department and throughout the organization. Broussard doesn’t just talk the talk but engages in mentorship as well by participating in an 18-month mentorship program, which has produced some very impactful leaders within the organization.

He emphasized the importance of sponsorship, which has enabled many females within these programs careers to blossom. He also takes on the part of a mentee through “reverse mentorship, “by having his employees train him in skills he doesn’t know, like analytics.“I find those things, where you make it part of the business where it’s not just a sideshow it becomes much more impactful, and when you do it in a way that’s natural, it has a large impact,” he said.

Johnny Taylor from SHRM conducted a study around the time that the Harvey Weinstein scandal broke. That study showed 1 in 5 executives almost all men, are more than likely to devote less one on one time to staff members for fear of being accused of harassment.

Taylor explained how that case was an example of a culture problem.

“This is an opportunity for us. We need to own this. This is about culture. You can pass all the laws that you want, all the postings, and all the regulations. But at the end of the day, something is wrong with your culture when someone is allowed to exist in the open engaging in this kind of behavior,” he said.

A good portion of men actually don’t know what constitutes sexual harassment. He attributed some of this lack of understanding to the “boys will be boys” way of raising children.

To combat this, he suggested putting men and women together to understand how to interact with each other in a safe, honest way. The good old boys club and men trying to solve all women’s problems without actually listening and engaging are two things of the past, the panel concluded, not for the future.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Latest News

Helping to Serve Those Most in Need

Originally Published by Kaiser Permanente Kaiser Permanente will provide more than $40 million in grants to community-based organizations in the coming months. Many of those grants will help ensure access to health care for those most in need. “We are a mission-based nonprofit that believes everyone has the right to…

Cashless Society Benefits Financial Crime Prevention but Raises Concerns with Inclusion and Data Privacy

Originally Published by EY Majority believe financial institutions should make greater investments in cybersecurity to protect financial data Cash is no longer king and will not be the preferred method of payment by 2030, according to an EY poll on digital and cash payments. The survey of financial services professionals indicates…

goodwill industries, settle, disability,

Goodwill Industries to Pay $65,000 to Settle Disability Discrimination Suit

Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey, Inc. touts its hiring of people with disabilities, but recently settled a workplace discrimination lawsuit for $65,000. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) brought the lawsuit against Goodwill and announced Monday that the two groups had settled. According to…

TIAA Holds SoPro Business Resource Group Summit

TIAA recently launched its 10th Business Resource Group (BRG): SoPro, for Seasoned Professionals of TIAA. The SoPro BRG’s mission is to maximize the impact of TIAA’s network of seasoned professionals by bridging generational differences and promoting cross-cultural collaboration by sharing knowledge and experiences. This includes future collaboration and partnership with…

Boeing Programs Receive Aviation Week Laureate Awards

Originally published on Boeing.mediaroom.com. ecoDemonstrator and Ground-based Midcourse Defense programs recognized for achievements in aerospace wo Boeing [NYSE:BA] programs were honored today with Aviation Week Laureate Awards for extraordinary achievements in aerospace. Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator program was recognized in the Commercial Aviation Sustainability category. The ecoDemonstrator takes promising technologies out of the…