KPMG Helps Close the Literacy Gap for Children in Low-Income Communities

Two-thirds of children in lower income communities lack access to books the single biggest barrier to literacy resulting in low reading proficiency, a key predictor of a child’s future educational and economic success. To help bridge this gap, KPMG LLP (No. 16 on the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies list), the U.S. audit, tax and advisory firm, will put more than 150,000 new books into the hands of children in cities across the United States including the donation of its three millionth book through KPMG’s Family for Literacy (KFFL) program as part of a “Read to Succeed” initiative being conducted in partnership with non-profit social enterprise First Book.

More than 100 KPMG offices throughout the United States will host book distribution events in the coming weeks at schools and community organizations during Read to Succeed, with many taking place on March 2 to coincide with the National Education Association’s Read Across America Day.


KPMG partners and professionals along with spouses, family members, and alumni will volunteer at these events. Large-scale, pop-up book fairs will take place in Washington D.C., St. Louis, New Orleans/Baton Rouge, Detroit, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Charlotte, and Kansas City with 10,000 new books to be distributed in each location. Other distribution events with 1,000 books also will take place.

“At KPMG, we’re passionate about giving back to the communities where we live and work,” said Lynne Doughtie, KPMG Chairman and CEO. “Our focus on lifelong learning supports literacy, the most powerful building block in developing tomorrow’s leaders.”

Snapshot of KPMG’s commitment to eradicating childhood illiteracy:

  • KFFL established in 2008.
  • Millions of children reached.
  • Over one million dollars raised by KPMG people to purchase new books for children in need.
  • Thousands of volunteer hours donated by KPMG people and the extended KPMG family to support the cause.

“We have seen what a strong and positive impact we can have on the lives of children when we harness our collective efforts and resources,” said KPMG Deputy Chairman and Chief Operating Officer P. Scott Ozanus. “Our KPMG family remains committed to bridging the literacy gap in our country.”

“Ninety percent of the educators who have experienced a First Book/KPMG program said these efforts contributed to their students’ improved interest in reading,” said Kyle Zimmer, First Book President and CEO. “We’ve been thrilled to work with KPMG over the last eight years to close the literacy gap for children in low-income communities.”

To help get a new book into the hands of a child in need, donate here. Please check the KFFL Facebook page in mid-March for more details about the online auction.

Read more news @ DiversityInc.com

Latest News

Boeing Elects Lynne Doughtie to Board of Directors, Following Resignation of Director Caroline Kennedy

Originally published on boeing.mediaroom.com. The Boeing Company (No. 27 on 2020 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list) board of directors today announced that Lynne Doughtie has been elected to the board, replacing Caroline Kennedy who has resigned following three years of dedicated service. Doughtie, 58, retired from KPMG in 2020, after serving as U.S. Chairman and CEO…

Flint, Michigan water plant

Ex-Michigan Governor Charged for Racist Lead Poisoning of Flint Water Supply; COVID-19 Vaccines Not Increasing in Availability; Democrats Plan to Repeal Trump Rules; and More

Former Michigan Governor formally charged for poisoning thousands of predominantly Black Flint citizens with water containing lead. In 2014, when the city of Flint was forced by the state to begin taking its water supply from the Flint river rather than using water from nearby Detroit as it had for…

NYPD under suit

NYPD Sued for Years of Racial Abuse and Use of Excessive Force; Trump Administration Approves Discrimination Against LGBTQ individuals; and More

NYPD sued by Attorney General for years of racial abuse and use of excessive force. In what’s been called a “landmark lawsuit,” The New York Times has reported that New York state Attorney General Letitia James is suing the city of New York, the mayor and the NYPD’s leaders, alleging…

NBCUniversal News Group Launches NBCU Academy, Offering Training to Universities and Community Colleges

NBCUniversal News Group launched NBCU Academy, a new, innovative, multiplatform journalism training and development program for four-year university and community college students through education, on-campus training and online programming. Originally published on corporate.comcast.com. The initiative includes a curated onsite curriculum for hands-on learning experience with world-class NBCU News Group journalists,…

Kaiser

Kaiser Permanente: Committing $8.15M for Racial Equity

Originally published on about.kaiserpermanente.org. Grants to grassroots and nonprofit organizations will help address structural racism and practices that prevent communities of color from achieving good health and well-being. Kaiser Permanente (DiversityInc Hall of Fame), the nation’s largest integrated, nonprofit health system, has awarded $8.15 million to support dozens of nonprofit…

Toyota Research Institute and Stanford University’s Dynamic Design Lab Study How to Improve Automotive Safety

Originally published on pressroom.toyota.com. Inspired by the Skills of Professional Drift Drivers, Research Seeks to Combine the Technology of Vehicle Automation with Artificial Intelligence Algorithms What if every driver who ran into trouble had the instinctive reflexes of a professional race car driver and the calculated foresight of a supercomputer…

Tribal elder

Loss of Tribal Elders Due to COVID-19 Decimating Indigenous Populations; Colorado Revamps Common-Law Marriage Requirements, Making Them More Friendly for LGBTQ Couples; and More

Loss of tribal elders due to COVID-19 decimating Indigenous populations. The Muscogee, Navajo, Blackfeet Nation, White Mountain Apache and Choctaw tribes are among the many communities of Indigenous people suffering irreparable losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, New York Times reporter Jack Healy has reported. Already impacted by infection rates…