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Opinion: Is 'White Women' Really a Disparaging Term

“White women” is now a disparaging term, says Kyle Smith of the National Review.


In a dismissive barrage of privileged and tone-deaf ramblings, Smith attempts to castigate the people who have called out problematic white women. And if we are being honest, white women have always been just as problematic as white men. However, that’s something Smith won’t admit.

Instead readers were subjected to his accounts of their victimhood.

He, completely, ignored the blatant issues highlighted by various media outlets writing:

“Today, white women are being lumped together into a giant bloc subject to absurdly broad stereotyping and vitriolic condemnation. They’re being told to step back and know their place by writers in the New York Times (“white women benefit from patriarchy by trading on their whiteness to monopolize resources for mutual gain”), The New Yorker (“despite the enduring legacy of testimony by black women, white women have often played the protagonists in the history of sexual violence, and black women have been relegated to the supporting cast”) and NBC News (“white women who voted for Trump . . . clearly have no issue with the president’s openly misogynistic behavior, his demeaning of female reporters and his mocking of [Christine Blasey] Ford”).”

Smith even, single-handedly, placed the onus of “white women” becoming a disparaging term on Susan Collins stating:

“The proximate cause of “white women” being turned into a pejorative is Senator Susan Collins, whose support for Brett Kavanaugh a week ago was in line with her support for Supreme Court nominees in general. She has voted for all of them. Moreover, she enjoys an 88 percent rating from the National Organization for Women. Yet Collins’s vote inspired Alexis Grenell, the author of the Times op-ed quoted above, to say white women voted for Trump “to prop up their whiteness.” Women’s March leader Linda Sarsour denounced Collins as “the mother & grandmother of white women in America who gave us a Donald Trump presidency.”

He, clearly, turned a blind eye to the near daily occurrences of “nice, well-meaning” white women who call the police on Black folks who are minding their business. Evidently, he doesn’t read or watch the news. A simple Google search of “white women calling the police” could easily destroy his argument. Smith also overlooked the fact that white women, 53% to be exact, put Trump in office.

Lest we not forgot, white women attempting to co-opt movements started by Black people and then crying foul when they are called out.

Mr. Smith will disregard the countless stories of passive aggressiveness displayed by white women in the media, the workplace and in life in general. His heart must bleed listening to their empty apologies. His is the only one.

Instead of tasking his counterparts to do better, he deflected the conversation to how dismissed white men have done well in the justice game by voting for Hillary Clinton.

And by no means is anyone saying that white women haven’t been victimized.

But in Smith’s “chivalrous” undertaking to absolve white women of their violations, he erased the voices of the minorities affected by their actions.

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