childhood disability
(Lightspring/Shutterstock)

Indigenous Children, Biracial Children and Black Children Most Likely to Have Disabilities, Census Reports

An estimated 7 million children in the U.S. — or more than 6% of children overall — have some form of disability, but according to new data published by the Census Bureau, disabilities aren’t spread equally among the races. Instead, there are distinct racial divisions in childhood disability rates, with American Indian and Alaska Native children having the highest disability rates overall, especially in the American South and Northeast.

Anagha Srikanth of The Hill has reported that “disability is most prevalent among American Indian and Alaska Native children, followed by biracial children and then Black children, according to the study, which compared estimates from the 2019 American Community Survey (ACS) to the 2008 ACS. Asian, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander children were least likely to have a disability, while both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children fell in between.” 

While they have detected the disparity in disabilities between races, Census officials have admitted they aren’t sure what may lie behind their finding — possibly attributing it to disparities in health care or “differences across cultures in how disability is perceived and understood may lead to differences in disability reporting.”

“What researchers do know is that once people arrive in the United States, access to health care is inequitable, which could account for the increase in disability prevalence among Asian and Hispanic children not seen in other populations,” Srikanth said.

In an interview with ABC’s Sara Yumeen, Regan Bergmark, an otolaryngologist at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said “there are decades of evidence that these particular racial and ethnic groups, especially American Indian, Native American groups and Black Americans, have poor access to care, and also may not have access to the same quality of healthcare services.” 

Srikanth reported that “the inequity is perpetuated by both the monetary and nonmonetary costs associated with caring for children with disabilities, which the brief says can be ‘substantial.'”

According to Census officials, “children in poverty were more likely to have a disability than children above the poverty threshold in both 2008 and 2019, increasing ‘significantly’ in the decade in between.” Their report also suggested that the rate of disability could be even higher, considering “the fact that diagnoses may be more readily available to or more sought out by certain groups in the United States, relative to others.”

“A lack of access to high-quality care can be a major contributor to the higher rates of disability,” added Yumeen. “Native American children and their families have historically had inadequate prenatal care, higher rates of premature birth and exposure to environmental stressors. Some live in rural or remote communities where they may experience difficulty with transportation to appointments and higher wait times. Finding primary care providers and pediatricians who understand the unique cultural needs of these children can also pose a challenge.”

Related: For more recent diversity and inclusion news, click here.

 

Latest News

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock

11 Mayors Team Up To Launch New Local Reparations Efforts, Establish Framework for a National Reparations Program

Following an announcement in March that city officials in Evanston, Illinois would begin paying qualifying city residents up to $25,000 in reparations for use on property payments and home repair, and fresh off the government’s announcement of Juneteenth becoming a federal holiday, mayors in 11 additional U.S. cities have announced…

Texas Governor Greg Abbott

Texas Governor Approves Bill Banning Discussions of Race and Racism Within State’s Schools

Texas lawmakers continue to astound with the number of racist, transphobic laws they are willing to try to write into law.  In the last few months alone, we’ve seen Texas lawmakers draft legislation that would penalize parents who support and help their transgender children access gender-affirming care with jail time…

Georgia Power, Georgia Power Foundation Invested More Than $20 Million To Help Meet Community Challenges in 2020

Originally published at southerncompany.com. Southern Company ranked No. 20 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list in 2021.   Georgia Power and the Georgia Power Foundation today released their annual Citizenship Report highlighting how the company, its employees and retirees gave back to Georgia communities last year, helping to build…

Toyota Financial Services Issues New Asset-Backed Green Bond, Highlighting Toyota’s Ongoing Commitment to Sustainability

Originally published at pressroom.toyota.com. Toyota Motor North America ranked No. 7 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list in 2021.   Toyota Financial Services (TFS) issued its latest Asset-Backed Green Bond, reinforcing the company’s longstanding commitment to the sale of environmentally friendly vehicles. Net proceeds from the $1.6…

ADP Recognized as a Customers’ Choice in 2021 Gartner Peer Insights ‘Voice of the Customer’

Originally published at mediacenter.adp.com. ADP ranked No. 8 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list in 2021.   Industry analyst firm Gartner recognized ADP as a Customers’ Choice with category distinctions in Midsize Enterprises and North America in its 2021 Gartner Peer Insights ‘Voice of the Customer’: Cloud HCM Suites…

Cigna building

Cigna and New York Life Expand Eligibility for ‘Brave of Heart Fund’ Grants Supporting Families of Healthcare Workers Who Lost Their Lives in the Fight Against COVID-19

Originally published at cigna.com. Cigna ranked No. 33 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list in 2021.   On June 17, the foundations of New York Life and Cigna announced that the Brave of Heart Fund, which provides monetary grants to the families of heroic health care workers…