Greta Thunberg, photograph, library of congress, Shane Balkowitsch
Greta Thunberg arrived in New York Sept. 23 after traveling across the ocean on a zero emissions sailboat. Before leaving North America on Nov. 13, Thunberg tweeted out the photo of her that is now archived in the Library of Congress. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Shane Balkowitsch)

Greta Thunberg Photograph Archived in Library of Congress

A photograph of Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg has been archived at the Library of Congress in Washington.

The dramatic black-and-white image by photographer Shane Balkowitsch shows Thunberg at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation during her trip to the U.S. in October. Balkowitsch created the photograph using a more than 150-year-old photography method called “wet plate collodion,” which involves wetting a glass plate with chemicals before inserting it into a camera to create an image.

In his short visit with Thunberg, Balkowitsch also took a closer-up image of her face. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Shane Balkowitsch)

Balkowitsch spoke to the Bismarck Tribune, where he called the photograph, titled “Standing for Us All,” his “most important work to date.”

The image has been shared across at least 15 publications and has garnered more than 1 million likes on social media, according to the Tribune. Now visitors at the Library of Congress can request to view the glass plate the image is printed on.

Thunberg shared the photograph on her Twitter account Nov. 13, the day she left North America on a zero-emission boat to sail back to Europe. She visited the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in South Dakota on Oct. 8, where she spoke to students at Standing Rock High School.

Balkowitsch told the Tribune that he heard about Thunberg’s visit through Standing Rock Sioux Tribe members. He has been using the same method of wet plate collodion to capture 1,000 Native American people as part of a 15-year-long project. Balkowitsch told the Tribune he had had just a few minutes to capture Thunberg’s photograph because her schedule had changed.

The 16-year-old climate activist’s visit was met with both praise and contempt. Her scathing Sept. 23 speech at the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York went viral.

“You’re failing us, but young people are starting to understand your betrayal,” she said. “The eyes of all future generations are upon you. And if you choose to fail us, I say we will never forgive you.”

A Twitter user had shared the video with a comment, calling Thunberg an “actress.” President Donald Trump retweeted the post, praising the user for mocking the teen.

Trump, who had briefly shown up to the summit, also retweeted the video with the facetious caption, “She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!”

As a sarcastic response, Thunberg changed her Twitter bio to “a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future.”

Regardless of the criticism Thunberg has faced, she has emboldened young people across the world to protest for climate action.

“I want to thank all the people who I’ve met I North America for their incredible hospitality,” Thunberg tweeted along with the photograph. “And thank you all for your amazing support!”

Related Story: Greta Thunberg, Teen Climate and Environmental Activist, Wins ‘Alternative Nobel Prize’

Latest News

Black renters

New Study Reveals Landlords Consistently Discriminate Against Potential Renters With Black or Hispanic ‘Sounding’ Names

In the largest study of its kind ever conducted, researchers with the National Bureau of Economic Research have uncovered what many people of color already know when hunting for an apartment or home: most landlords consistently discriminate or harbor bias against non-white individuals looking to rent their property.  Bloomberg’s Kelsey…

book banning

American Library Association Documents 155 Attempts at Banning Books About POC or LGBTQ Issues in the Last 6 Months

In a depressing turn for anyone who thought society may have outgrown book burning or censorship of books over the last 100 years, it appears the hate-filled phenomenon is back on the rise, increasing with alarming frequency across the country. CNN’s Nicole Chavez has reported the American Library Association “has…

Novartis Chief Medical Officer John Tsai on Balancing Medical Innovations With Patient Needs

Originally published at novartis.com by Elizabeth Dougherty. John Tsai is Novartis’ Head of Global Drug Development and Chief Medical Officer. Novartis Pharmaceuticals is a DiversityInc Hall of Fame company.   John Tsai’s career as a physician, and now as Head of Global Drug Development and Chief Medical Officer for Novartis, had an unlikely…

Montgomery Mayor Steven Reed

City of Montgomery, Alabama Faces $25,000 State Fine for Changing Street Named After a Confederate Leader

Despite a state law designed to “protect” longstanding Confederate monuments and memorials, the city of Montgomery, Alabama, has decided that it would rather incur a fine than continue going on with a city street named after President of the Confederate States from 1861 to 1865, Jefferson Davis. Kim Chandler of…

Global Diversity

Despite Massive Uptick in Global DEI Initiatives, New Study Reveals Real Change in Corporate Workforces Remains Slow 

Even though DEI as a business imperative continues to grow both in the United States and around the world, a new study has found that many business leaders and executives have merely raised awareness of why diversity, equity and inclusion is important — as opposed to actually making meaningful progress…