Why Is Global Diversity So Difficult?

What are the prime challenges facing global businesses today that hinder inclusion efforts? What best practices are being implemented globally, and what can you learn from other companies? See what our exclusive research in 17 countries finds.

It's a question that challenges many companies. How much local control is needed and what happens when local cultural customs contrast with corporate values? What best practices are being implemented? And what company does it better than everyone else?


DiversityInc examined global diversity trends in depth in our exclusive global research. We analyzed data and demographics with more than 100 responses from 17 countries across Europe, Asia and the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) countries. The result was a wealth of information and best practices on cultural concerns and how they are being addressed.

This 1,835-word excerpt from the full "2011 Global Research Report" illustrates the complexity of this subject and the different views on what constitutes inclusion in varying regions and countries. Four detailed charts are included.

Readers will take away:

  • Which European countries dissuade valuing differences because of a cultural emphasis on assimilation
  • How norms around advancing women vary between European and Asian nations, and what companies are doing to address issues of gender equity
  • What two dominant challenges face companies in Asia
  • The average tenure of diversity/inclusion programs in the BRIC countries and their projected progress toward inclusion
  • There is a groundswell in several countries to hire one particular demographic group—see which is it and why

Go to BestPractices.DiversityInc.com to read the "Why Is Global Diversity So Difficult" global report.

For more on global-diversity best practices, read "Best Practices to Overcome Global Diversity Challenges" and read "The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity" for a list of companies that excel in this area of diversity management.

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REUTERS

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Myneca Ojo / FACEBOOK

Five Black women, members of the Grandview Golf Club in Braddock, the oldest public golf course in York County, Pa., decided to meet on Saturday for a round of golf. The outing ended with the club co-owner, who is white, calling the police on the only Black, female players on the course because they allegedly played too slow and did not want to cancel their membership and leave.

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