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It's Not Over for Andrew Gillum: Florida Governor Race Could Head to Recount

"Florida law requires an automatic machine recount in any race where the margin of victory is within one half of one percentage point."

Screenshot from CNN

The Florida governor race between Democrat Andrew Gillum and Republican Ron DeSantis wasn't decided on Tuesday night, as it appears there may be a recount on the ballots.


Gillum conceded the race just before 11 p.m. on Tuesday when it seemed he was too far behind DeSantis in votes, but thousands of votes remained uncounted. Since then, the margins between the two have greatly decreased.

"As of 9 a.m., DeSantis' lead was just 42,948 votes out of 8,189,305 ballots cast — equal to 0.52 percent of the vote," according to The Miami Herald.

"Florida law requires an automatic machine recount in any race where the margin of victory is within one half of one percentage point."

Around 2 p.m., the margin had dropped below 0.50 percent.

DeSantis is holding a 0.47 percent or "38,515 ballots out of more than 8.2 million cast," The Palm Beach Post reports.

Gillum's campaign said, in a statement:

"On Tuesday night, the Gillum for Governor campaign operated with the best information available about the number of outstanding ballots left to count. Since that time, it has become clear there are many more uncounted ballots than was originally reported. We are committed to ensuring every single vote in Florida is counted."

On Thursday, his campaign offices across the state reached out to voters who casted provisional ballots, but were not counted Tuesday evening due to an issue with their registration or identification.

Gillum tweeted:

In Palm Beach county alone, more than 10,000 provisional ballots were cast. Thousands of votes still need to be counted.

"Gillum's campaign has hired Barry Richard to represent them during the recount," according to CNN. "Richard had previously been known for representing Bush during the 2000 recount."

Broward County is important for Gillum as it is considered rich in Democratic votes. According to information published by the Florida Division of Elections, the county has yet to report all its early voting and absentee voting totals.

County election officials in Florida have until 1 p.m. Saturday to report unofficial results to the state. "If the winning margin is less than 0.5 points according to those results, a machine recount is mandated by state law, unless the losing candidate says in writing that he does not wish to pursue the recount," according to USA Today.

At the same time, the Senate race between Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson and Republican Gov. Rick Scott looks like it's also headed to a recount.

As of Thursday morning, state election counts put Scott ahead of Nelson by just 22,000 votes, according to The Associated Press. An estimated 113,000 ballots had not been counted, statewide. And they are in locations Nelson would be expected to win by a vote margin of 24.9 percent.

The Conversation (1)
votetocorrect10 Nov, 2018
Florida and AZ are always the only states that take days to weeks to count votes after an election. The hope in these states (by the Red's) is that the Dems concede when down a few thousand votes. When Dems don't concede (history shows), votes counted will prove Dems will win!

White Kansas Official Tells Black Women He Belongs to the 'Master Race': Video

Louis Klemp pointed to the gap in his teeth as proof. Kansas governor wants him to resign.

During a public commissioner meeting, a Leavenworth County commissioner, Louis Klemp, a white man, made "master race" comments to a Black woman.

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Update: Illinois Task Force Rushes to Release Details That Contradict 'Security' Hat Claim

Jemel Roberson family's attorney says the task force has a habit of not disciplining, firing, or criminally charging officers in police shootings.

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The Illinois State Police Public Integrity Task Force released a preliminary report less than three days after the shooting of Jemel Roberson, Black security guard in Robbins, Ill, which contradicted what witnesses and Roberson's family attorney have said.

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Andrew Gillum: Count Every Vote

"If we don't swear in a new governor until January, what is the rush for you?" Gillum said, referring to Florida Gov. Rick Scott and President Trump.

Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis' lead over Democratic candidate Andrew Gillum narrowed to just 33,000 votes on Saturday, resulting in a mandated machine recount of ballots. The results are due in Tallahassee on Thursday, and if Gillum gains about 15,000 votes, a hand recount will take place.

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Wisconsin Teens Throw Up Nazi Salute in Junior Prom Photo

Bigotry continues to thrive in a state that has no diversity.

A high school in Baraboo, Wisc., is currently under investigation after a picture of dozens white male students throwing up the Nazi salute at their junior prom was recently shared on Twitter.

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Black Security Guard Doing His Job Shot Dead By Police

Police officers saw, Jemel Roberson, "a Black man with a gun, and basically killed him," said a witness.

WGN Screenshot

Jemel Roberson, age 26, was working as a security guard at Manny's Blue Room bar in Robbins, Ill., when a drunken patron who he had been asked to leave earlier, returned with a gun. The patron shot four people.

Roberson, who was armed at the time, returned fire, grabbed one of the men, held him down and waited for police to arrive, according to witnesses.

"He had somebody on the ground with his knee in back, with his gun in his back like, 'Don't move,'" Adam Harris told WGN-TV.

An unnamed Midloathian police officer, according to other officers in that department who were called to assist Robbins' police, opened fire on Roberson, killing him.

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#ShoppingWhileBlack: Maryland Couple Sues Costco for $4M

A routine trip to Costco turned into a case of racial profiling.

Courtesy of WBAL TV

Barbara and Bahri Wallace loved to shop at Costco. And this trip to the megastore should have been like every other trip. However, while the couple were shopping at the Costco in Anne Arundel County in Maryland in May, the husband and wife reported they were being watched by management.

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HBCUs​ Set Foundation for Black Politicians in Key Positions

"Black people have always been underestimated. The Black college experience is still an exceptional way to train young people," said Senator Art Haywood, a Morehouse Graduate.

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What Kamala Harris, Alma Adams, Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams all have in common, in addition to being influential in U.S. politics, is they're graduates of Historically Black Colleges and Universities ( HBCUs) — Howard University, North Carolina A&T, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University, and Spelman College.

Approximately 40 percent of the members of Congress are HBCU graduates, according to the Network Journal, a Black professional and small business magazine. And recipients of The United Negro College Fund and Thurgood Marshall Foundation scholarships graduate from college at rates well above the national average.

"We're producing outstanding leaders in all of the major professions," said Harry L. Williams, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and former Delaware State president.

"Anytime you can look at (HBCU) success stories, it just enhances their relevancy and continues to move them forward in a positive way."

This year, a record 38 women of color were elected to Congress. Many of them are HBCU graduates.

The prospect of so many Black-college graduates being elected to statewide office in the same year is unprecedented, Keneshia Grant, an assistant professor of political science at Howard University, said.

And they are touting their HBCU training. Abrams expressed her disapproval of legislation plans for education that did not include those institutions.

Gillum responded to President Trump's tweet attacking him about his lack of Ivy League education:

Art Haywood is one of four Black state senators in Pennsylvania, and one of two from Morehouse.

"If the two Black state senators had come from Harvard or Yale, then those schools would get all the credit," Haywood said.

"Black people have always been underestimated," Haywood said. "I don't think there's any more validation required. The Black college experience is still an exceptional way to train young people."

Of politicians like Abrams and Gillum, the president of HBCU Dillard University Walter Kimbrough said they are sending a message: "It's a reaffirmation, not only for students but for families, that you can go to an HBCU and compete with anyone."

Approximately 13 percent of HBCU graduates are CEOS, 40 percent are engineers and 50 percent are professors at non-HBCUs, according to the Network Journal.

The HBCUs Make America Strong: The Positive Economic Impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities study shows how the United States economy benefits from HBCUs: $14.8 billion in economic impact. In addition, graduates predominantly come from low-income areas, giving them and the communities the opportunity to break cycles of poverty and open doors to successful and lucrative careers. Individual graduates can earn $927,000 within their lifetime, $130 billion collectively over their lifetime.

Trump Cancels Visit to WWI Cemetery Because of Rain

"It's incredible that a president would travel to France for this significant anniversary — and then remain in his hotel room watching TV," David Frum said on Twitter.

Aisne-Marne American Cemetery dedicated to the U.S. soldiers killed in the Belleau Wood battle during World War I / YOUTUBE

Light, steady rain resulted in President Trump cancelling plans to attend a commemoration in France on Saturday to honor U.S. soldiers killed during World War I.

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