Logo Courtesy of EY

EY Explores Belonging in the Workplace, with New Belonging Barometer Study

Originally Published by EY.

While today’s social climate has been associated with controversy and disagreements, it also seems to be banding people together in a more positive way surprisingly at work. Regardless of background, gender, sexual orientation or race, individuals are coming together in search of a sense of community and belonging, with many expecting and finding it within the workplace. In fact, in the context of work, research shows that when people feel like they belong, they are more productive, motivated and engaged as well as 3.5 times more likely to contribute to their full, innovative potential.

The new EY “Belonging Barometer” study uncovers how more than 1,000 employed adult Americans define belonging, what makes them feel like they belong at work and what makes them feel excluded in the workplace.

Key finding one: Diversity and Belonging are Workplace Expectations

Nearly half of American workers believe that diversity is best represented at work and over a third feel the greatest sense of belonging at work.

  • Forty-five percent of respondents believe that diversity is best represented at their place of work
  • Second only to home (62 percent), one third (34 percent) of respondents feel the greatest sense of belonging at work, ahead of their physical neighborhood (19 percent) and place of worship (17 percent)
  • When asked in what ways do you feel like you belong at work:
    • More than half (56 percent) of respondents feel they belong most at work when they feel trusted and respected, with baby boomers feeling this way the most at 63 percent, compared to Gen X at 56 percent and millennials at 53 percent
    • Thirty-nine percent of respondents feel they belong most at work when they have the ability to speak freely and voice their opinion
    • One third (34 percent) feel they belong most at work when their unique contributions are valued, with White respondents agreeing the most at 36 percent, followed by Black respondents at 31 percent and Hispanic respondents at 27 percent

Key finding two: Regular Check-ins Prevent Workers from Checking Out
Thirty-nine percent of respondents say that when colleagues check in with them about how they are doing both personally and professionally, they feel the greatest sense of belonging at work.

  • 44 percent of women and 33 percent of men agree
  • This response was most popular across all generations, with 35 percent of millennials, 40 percent of Gen X and 45 percent of baby boomers agreeing
  • Across all generations, the “check-in” took priority over actions such as public recognition (23 percent), being invited to out of office events (20 percent), being asked to join a meeting with senior leaders (14 percent) and being included on emails with senior leaders (9 percent)

Key finding three: Is Exclusion a Form of Bullying Women Seem to Think So
The majority of women (61 percent) believe that exclusion is a form of bullying in the workplace, the majority of men (53 percent) believe it is not.

  • More than half (54 percent) of all respondents believe that exclusion is a form of bullying at work, 46 percent do not
  • 68 percent of the LGBTQ community believe that exclusion is a form of bullying
  • Fifty seven percent of Latino respondents believe that exclusion is a form of bullying, compared to 53 percent of White respondents and half (50 percent) of Black respondents
  • Generationally, nearly half of millennials (48 percent) feel the strongest that exclusion is nota form of bullying, compared to 46 percent of Gen X and 44 percent of baby boomers

Key finding four: The Emotional Barometer: Social Exclusion Makes People Feel Physically Ignored, Stressed, Sad and Even Angry
When social exclusion happens at work, people feel physically and emotionally isolated. More than 40 percent of respondents across generations and genders feel physically alone, or in other words, ignored. Others also experience feelings of stress (26 percent of males) and sadness (28 percent of women).

  • Generationally:
    • Millennials are most likely to feel ignored (38 percent), stressed (30 percent) and lonely (24 percent)
    • Gen X are most likely to feel ignored (41 percent), stressed (27 percent) and sad (26 percent)
    • Baby boomers are most likely to feel ignored (45 percent), angry (26 percent), stressed (21 percent) and sad (21 percent)

Latest News

Flint, Michigan water plant

Ex-Michigan Governor Charged for Racist Lead Poisoning of Flint Water Supply; COVID-19 Vaccines Not Increasing in Availability; Democrats Plan to Repeal Trump Rules; and More

Former Michigan Governor formally charged for poisoning thousands of predominantly Black Flint citizens with water containing lead. In 2014, when the city of Flint was forced by the state to begin taking its water supply from the Flint river rather than using water from nearby Detroit as it had for…

NYPD under suit

NYPD Sued for Years of Racial Abuse and Use of Excessive Force; Trump Administration Approves Discrimination Against LGBTQ individuals; and More

NYPD sued by Attorney General for years of racial abuse and use of excessive force. In what’s been called a “landmark lawsuit,” The New York Times has reported that New York state Attorney General Letitia James is suing the city of New York, the mayor and the NYPD’s leaders, alleging…

Toyota Research Institute and Stanford University’s Dynamic Design Lab Study How to Improve Automotive Safety

Originally published on pressroom.toyota.com. Inspired by the Skills of Professional Drift Drivers, Research Seeks to Combine the Technology of Vehicle Automation with Artificial Intelligence Algorithms What if every driver who ran into trouble had the instinctive reflexes of a professional race car driver and the calculated foresight of a supercomputer…

Tribal elder

Loss of Tribal Elders Due to COVID-19 Decimating Indigenous Populations; Colorado Revamps Common-Law Marriage Requirements, Making Them More Friendly for LGBTQ Couples; and More

Loss of tribal elders due to COVID-19 decimating Indigenous populations. The Muscogee, Navajo, Blackfeet Nation, White Mountain Apache and Choctaw tribes are among the many communities of Indigenous people suffering irreparable losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, New York Times reporter Jack Healy has reported. Already impacted by infection rates…

Justice for George Floyd

Officer Who Pressed Knee Into George Floyd’s Neck to Stand Trial Alone; Judge Halts Federal Execution of Lisa Montgomery, Only Woman on Death Row

Officer who pressed knee into George Floyd’s neck to stand trial alone in March. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin — the man who can be seen on video pressing his knee into George Floyd’s neck for an excruciating 8 minutes and 46 seconds — will now stand trial alone,…

BASF Starts Global Registration for New and Environmentally Friendly Insecticide Active Ingredient

Originally published on BASF.com. BASF ranked No. 14 on The 2020 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list. Regulatory dossiers for Axalion™insecticide submitted in Australia and Korea Active ingredient with novel mode of action and high compatibility with beneficial insects, including pollinators First sales for Axalion-based products expected by 2023…

TIAA’s Roger Ferguson on Solving the Student Debt Crisis

CEO Roger Ferguson shares how TIAA (No. 9 on 2020 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list) teamed up with loan wellness platform Savi to help nonprofit workers reduce monthly student debt payments and work toward forgiveness. Watch his full talk at the link below. https://www.tiaa.org/public/foward-focus-/episode-7-your-financial-future-the-path-forward