Women's History Month Timeline and Facts & Figures

Our timeline of historic women's achievements and detailed facts & figures serve as a year-round educational tool.

National Women's History Month can trace its roots back to March 8, 1857, when women from New York City factories staged a protest over working conditions. International Women's Day was first observed in 1909, but it wasn't until 1981 that Congress established National Women's History Week to be commemorated the second week of March. In 1987, Congress expanded the week to a month.


Emphasizing the increasing value of having women in leadership positions can help you increase cultural competence among your employees. It's important to note how women's roles have evolved, how flexible work arrangements allow more women to combine family and professional responsibilities, and how many glass ceilings still have not been shattered.

The timeline shown here illustrates significant dates in women's history and major historic figures, while the facts data we have chosen to present here represents information of relevance to corporate America, such as education (available labor pool), business ownership, and progress in gaining executive and management positions.

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70 Percent of Irish Women Voted to Legalize Abortion in Ireland Creating Landslide Victory

A most conservative country when it comes to abortion rights begins to wake up to the logical conclusion that if your gender can't bear children, you should probably stop mansplaining and man-deciding.

Presiding Officer Carmel McBride prepares the polling station for the referendum on liberalizing abortion law . / REUTERS

UPDATE: May 26, 2018

Ireland has voted to repeal its abortion ban. The Irish Times exit poll suggested that women voted by 70 percent in favor of legalizing abortion.

ORIGINAL STORY

Ireland is one of Europe's most socially conservative countries, with one of the world's strictest bans on abortion. Residents went to the polls on Friday for a "once in a generation opportunity" to decide whether to liberalize or maintain the country's abortion laws.

For Americans, conservatives trying to control abortion rights using religion sound all too familiar.

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Salma Hayek Calls for Male Stars to Get Pay Cut

"We all have to be part of the adjustment. That's one idea. I'm going to be hated for it. I hope I can get a job after this!" Hayek said.

REUTERS

(Reuters) — Mexican American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women.

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Misogyny and Racism Have Catapulted Women in the polls for House Seats

Voters speak: We want more than just white men in office.

FACEBOOK

A record number of women are running for U.S. House of Representatives seats, along with women running at every level of public office. And they're winning.

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Michelle Obama: 'I Wish that Girls Could Fail as Bad as Men Do and Be OK'

The former first lady says women execs need to "really shake it up" when they get a seat at the table.

At the United State of Women Summit in Los Angeles on Saturday, former First Lady Michelle Obama talked with actor and activist Tracee Ellis Ross, star of "Black-ish," about gender equality.

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Golf Club That Called Cops on Black Women Members Faces Business Backlash, Potential Investigation

"It is appalling that someone would call the police for a non-violent incident where the only crime was being Black on a public golf course," State Sen. Vincent J. Hughes said in a statement.

After the co-owner of Grandview Golf Club in York County, Pa., called the police on five Black women members for allegedly golfing too slow, the club's business vendors are beginning to bail and a state senator is calling for an investigation.

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Golf Club Calls Police on Black Women Members for Allegedly Playing Too Slow

The five women, one a local NAACP president, say it's a clear case of racial and gender discrimination.

Myneca Ojo / FACEBOOK

Five Black women, members of the Grandview Golf Club in Braddock, the oldest public golf course in York County, Pa., decided to meet on Saturday for a round of golf. The outing ended with the club co-owner, who is white, calling the police on the only Black, female players on the course because they allegedly played too slow and did not want to cancel their membership and leave.

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