Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Timeline and Facts & Figures

Our timeline of Asian American achievements and detailed facts & figures serve as year-round educational tools.

This diversity-management resource offers insight to evolving workplace diversity, featuring a detailed timeline of Asian American events and the relevant demographics you need to know.


President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution in 1978 that declared May 4–10, 1979, as the first Asian Pacific American Heritage Week. This was later extended by President George H.W. Bush in 1990 to a month-long celebration. The month commemorates the arrival of the first Japanese immigrant, a fisherman named Nakanohama Manjiro, or "John Mung," to the United States on May 7, 1843, and marks the transcontinental railroad's completion on May 10, 1869.

Click the images below to download a PDF, or click these links to expand: Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Timeline and Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Facts & Figures.

This article is an excerpt from DiversityInc's Best Practices subscription-only site. 

Why subscribe? 

 Exclusive diversity and inclusion Multimedia Resources, including webinars and downloadable toolkits.

 Connections to a community of Thought Leaders and practitioners.

• Concise Video Interviews with the nation's brightest D&I executives.

And much more

To read the entire piece you can access content by checking if your organization is already a member. To become a member, or convince your employer to sign up, check out this DiversityInc Best Practices overview.

Racist Professor Who Calls Blacks, Hispanics More Violent Than Whites Appointed to Trump's Sentencing Commission

William Otis will fit right in with Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III.

Bill Otis / SCREENSHOT VIA PBS NEWSHOUR

A former federal prosecutor who once said Blacks and Hispanics are more violent than whites has been tapped to join President Donald Trump's sentencing commission.

Read More Show Less

Texas Restaurant Defends 'Coon Chicken Inn' Blackface Caricature Sign

"Aunt Jemima, mammies, and lots of other Black collectibles are highly sought after, as is Americana collectibles with white characters," owners of Cook's Garage said in a Facebook post.

A neon sign from a 1920s restaurant called the "Coon Chicken Inn" contains a caricature of a Black man, with the name of the restaurant in his mouth. In 2017, the owners of Cook's Garage, a restaurant in predominantly white Lubbock, Texas, think it's appropriate to hang the racist sign in their establishment and call it "Americana History."

Read More Show Less

VIDEO: Michael Eric Dyson Explains Why Diversity is Essential in the U.S.

The renowned scholar spoke with DiversityInc at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's 47th Annual Legislative Conference.

During the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's 47th Annual Legislative Conference on Thursday, renowned scholar Michael Eric Dyson spoke with DiversityInc about why diversity is crucial for American society.

Read More Show Less

'Game of Thrones' Creators Draw Criticism Over New Race Fantasy Series 'Confederate'

The alternate racial history drama will test America's audience, for good or bad.

Although no script has been written yet, "Game of Thrones" creators D.B. Weiss and David Benioff have drawn criticism for their new show "Confederate," which takes place during a third American Civil War.

As the hit television series "Game of Thrones" nears its end, creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are putting plans in motion for their next HBO creation entitled, "Confederate," which has already triggered criticism from potential viewers.

Read More Show Less

Multiracial, Multiethnic Babies on the Increase in U.S.: Study

The rate is three times greater than it was in 1980.

REUTERS

In 2015, about one-in-seven, or 14 percent of, children in the U.S. under the age of one were multiracial or multiethnic, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data. The rate is three times greater than it was in 1980.

Read More Show Less

Interracial Marriage Becoming the Norm in U.S.: Report

The report's findings include that Black men with a bachelor's degree are more than twice as likely as Black women to intermarry.

A scene from the 2016 film “Loving,” which celebrates the commitment of Richard and Mildred Loving (portrayed by Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga).

Interracial marriage is on the rise, making more than a fivefold increase since 1967, when only 3 percent of newlyweds were intermarried, according to a Pew Research Center report released Thursday. However, interracial marriage is more accepted by Democrats than Republicans, and Black men and Asian women are more likely to marry someone of a different race.

Read More Show Less

Women's History Month Timeline and Facts & Figures

Our timeline of historic women's achievements and detailed facts & figures serve as a year-round educational tool.

National Women's History Month can trace its roots back to March 8, 1857, when women from New York City factories staged a protest over working conditions. International Women's Day was first observed in 1909, but it wasn't until 1981 that Congress established National Women's History Week to be commemorated the second week of March. In 1987, Congress expanded the week to a month.

Read More Show Less