VIDEO: Increasing the Pipeline of Black and Latino Physicians—A Success Story

To have culturally competent care, the United States needs more Black and Latino doctors. A unique program at Rutgers University is reaching underprivileged youth and helping them succeed in medical careers, said Dr. Kamal Khan, Director, Office of Diversity & Academic Success in the Sciences (ODASIS) at DiversityInc's event.


Dr. Kamal Khan

Director, Office for Diversity & Academic Success in the Sciences (ODASIS)

Rutgers University

Dr. Kamal Khan is the Director of The Office for Diversity and Academic Success in the Sciences (ODASIS)—an academic support unit within the Division of Life Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick/Piscataway campus—as well as an Associate Professor for the Department of Africana Studies and the Division of Life Sciences at Rutgers University. For over 20 years, Dr. Khan has dedicated his professional career to undergraduate instruction and academic counseling in efforts to increase and retain the number of underrepresented and economically disadvantaged students at Rutgers who pursue majors and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Since Dr. Khan's arrival at Rutgers, he has worked tirelessly to expand the university's graduate pool of professionals and strengthen the country's workforce by increasing the number of physicians, nurses, dentists, engineers, and mathematicians serving and diversifying the field.

Under the direction of Dr. Khan, the ODASIS program serves over 900 students per year, an increase of 85% since before he took leadership of the program. Dr. Khan's mentorship guides students from underrepresented populations into the STEM professions by fostering opportunities for his students to excel academically and encouraging their undergraduate success. He has developed and implemented a special recitation course in Biology and Chemistry for academic credit, sponsored by the Division of Life Sciences, and coordinates academic support in the areas of pre-calculus, calculus, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, systems physiology, statistics, and other upper-level science and mathematics courses. The objective of the program is to provide a strong academic foundation for students to not only finish their undergraduate degree, but to pursue either medical or graduate and professional schools. The efficacy of the program is furthered demonstrated by its receipt of a direct state grant from 1994 to present.

As Director of ODASIS, Dr. Khan coordinates a MCAT course for ACCESS-MED students supported by New Jersey Medical School, and has been integral in the development of new GRE courses. ACCESS-MED is a program offered by Rutgers University, Seton Hall University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School for undergraduate students that provides academic enrichment and support for groups who are currently underrepresented in medicine. Dr. Khan has also implemented several enrichment programs for high school students and incoming first-year students in order to expand the breadth of ODASIS and the reach of Rutgers, such as the Saturday Scholars Tutorial Program, the College English Prep Program for college credit, and the Johnson and Johnson High School Program, which includes the High School Saturday Math and English Enrichment Program and a Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) course.

For his remarkable commitment to undergraduate education and, most importantly, his extraordinary impact on undergraduate students, Dr. Khan has received the President's Award for Excellence in Administration, the Award for Excellence in Retention, the Rutgers Award for Programmatic Excellence in Undergraduate Education and the New Jersey Medical School Award of Recognition. Among his most recent awards are the Human Dignity Award, Award for Leadership in Diversity, and Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education, all of which were presented to him for his tireless work in creating an entire wing of undergraduate and professional opportunities for his students.

Abbott Introduces the Afinion™ 2 Analyzer Rapid Test System for Diabetes Management

State-of-the-art multi-assay test system helps people with diabetes get the HbA1c results they need within three minutes — allowing more time for consultation and care during a single healthcare visit.

Originally Published by Abbott.

Abbott announced the launch of its Afinion™ 2 analyzer in the U.S., the newest generation of the Afinion test system. The Afinion 2 builds on Abbott's heritage in diabetes care by empowering patients with information about their health that they can discuss with their providers during a single visit.

Read More Show Less

Toyota: Building Skills for High-Demand Jobs

Twenty-five elementary, middle and high schools to implement innovative project-based STEM programs in San Antonio.

TOYOTA

Schools in the greater San Antonio area will soon have additional resources to help prepare youth for the jobs of tomorrow. Toyota USA Foundation, together with Project Lead The Way (PLTW), awarded $400,000 in grants to provide curriculum and teacher professional development focused on computer science, engineering, and biomedical science.

Read More Show Less

People With Disabilities Forced to Live in Assisted Care Facilities

Some close to the issue are claiming this is a civil rights matter.

Minnesota has a civil rights issue. Thousands of people with disabilities who can't find quality home care are forced to resort to living with people three times their age. The state of Minnesota is paying for 1,500 people who are under the age of 65 to live in assisted living. This is the case with 25-year-old Korrie Johnson.

Read More Show Less

Racist Hackers Try, and Fail, to Dull Black Girl Magic in NASA Competition

Internet trolls motivated by racism attempt to thwart the scientific accomplishments of three young, bright Black women — but they aren't letting the haters win.

SCREENGRAB VIA NBC NEWS

A group of racist Internet trolls tried to hack a NASA competition to take votes away from the only group of all Black girls who were lead contenders in the race. But these "Hidden figures in the making," as they call themselves, refuse to let the negativity tarnish their Black girl magic.

Read More Show Less